#1
So we got drum mics for the studio and they're all set up and stuff, but I need to know how to get Reaper to recognize each mic as a separate track. We have all the mics plugged into the mixer and then a USB interface. Obviously it's necessary to get different tracks for applying compression to each drum individually. Thanks for any help.
#2
You cant. A mixer essentially allows you to take X number of inputs and reduce them down to one stereo output.

You'll need an interface with more inputs. If you're looking to record drums, its gonna cost about $400-$800 for an interface with enough for drums
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#3
That's a bummer. Is there any downside quality-wise to recording with only one track?
#4
Mixing since you have to mix the drums near perfectly as they are being recorded. You've got a little you can add after recording to the drums but nothing that will take a crap track from bad to good
Derpy Derp Derp Herp Derp
#5
I am only recording my own band as of now so we pretty much have all day. If we get a good track and then add compression to the whole thing, there won't be a huge compromise in quality, right? I thought I read somewhere that recording drums on one track leads to digital distortion from clipping and stuff like that but I don't see why that would happen if you do it correctly.
#6
if you do it correctly, no, you shouldnt have those issues. you just have to do all of your work on the front end to make sure everything is perfect. with each of the drums on separate tracks you can tweak things later, and tweak each drum individually. not possible with drums on a single track. however if you do a good job with the pre-mixing and setting up your mics correctly and stuff, there is no reason you cant have a solid drum track.
#7
See "Mixers For Recording"
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=751253

As well as the FAQ posted right before that one.

But as stated, mixers mix and only few have multi channel outputs...and that's getting expensive.
Most studios, including mine, use higher input interfaces such as the PreSonus Firestudio Project.

You can mix down at recording with your current setup but you will be unable to tweak things like EQ and compression of each mic which IMO is the most important part to getting the best sound in the end.
#8
Is it possible a multi-band compressor can do something similar to that?
#10
Mixers with a lot of bus outs, (Some examples) are what you will need if you want to split the signal after it goes though the mixer. However you'll still need a multi input interface such as the M-audio Delta 1010 to get all that audio into the computer.

I highly suggest staying away from mixers in the modern recording studio setups. Interfaces such as the PreSonus FP10 or Firestudio project have 8 preamped inputs, can be linked with 2 other units, and send every mic to their own track on the computer.
For hands on feel, most people get a control surface which is what most of those modern digital consoles in newer studios are.


In my studio I used to use a simple M-audio Audiophile 2496 PCI interface paired with a Yamaha MG10/2 mixer...but I only use that for my live broadcasts now as it only has a mono sub out so it's quite useless for recording.
These days I mostly use a PreSonus FP10 firewire interface but I'm planning on getting an M-Audio Project Mix I/O soon for more hands on feel with the benefit of the interface.
Last edited by moody07747 at Jun 11, 2010,
#11
Quote by sandyman323
what interface do you have and what mixer?


Just a Behringer Xenyx 1222FX and the little crappy USB interface it came with. There are 2 busses so if we only use one does that make the output mono and if we use both it will be stereo? It seemed like the panning from the mixer wasn't working when we only used one of the busses.
#12
Quote by sambot12
Just a Behringer Xenyx 1222FX and the little crappy USB interface it came with. There are 2 busses so if we only use one does that make the output mono and if we use both it will be stereo? It seemed like the panning from the mixer wasn't working when we only used one of the busses.


The Behringer Xenyx 1222FX does have an FX bus out which could be sent to another mono interface input but if you are only using the small USB interface like this ...well then, you're stuck just with the amount of inputs you are using anyways.

One bus is an FX out, the other is the main output bus.


Quote by sambot12
Is it possible a multi-band compressor can do something similar to that?


A Multi band compressor wont split the signal any, it's just a device that can compress set parts of the audio more or less.

In the end, if you want to record each mic separately, you're going to have to buy a new interface and I highly suggest the PreSonus Firestudio Project which has a firewire connection.
Last edited by moody07747 at Jun 11, 2010,
#13
Quote by moody07747
A Multi band compressor wont split the signal any, it's just a device that can compress set parts of the audio more or less.


I know that, but if I wanted to compress the bass drum differently than the higher frequencies for example, I could do that, right?
#14
Quote by sambot12
I know that, but if I wanted to compress the bass drum differently than the higher frequencies for example, I could do that, right?


Not really. You could compress the lower frequencies differently to the higher frequencies, but each drum will occupy all parts of the frequency spectrum, it's just some drums are more prominent in different parts.

Out of curiosity, what style of music are you trying to record?
#15
That makes sense, don't know why I didn't think of that. We play deathcore by the way.
#16
Right... I was going to suggest that if it was jazz or acoustic sort of music, you could probably get away with just some slight EQing to the drums as a collective whole, and maybe some light dynamic processing. Wouldn't have been ideal, but it would sound okay if executed properly.

If you're doing something really heavy like that, you're really not going to be able to achieve a suitable sound unless you can treat each individual drum seperately, unfortunately. All I can suggest is buying a new interface, or just live with the sound of it. Tascam make some pretty good gear for the price.
#17
I guess we'll just have to live with it for now because we don't have very much cash. Thanks for all the suggestions everyone.