#1
hey, so i bought a silicon fuzz kit from das musikding and attempted to build it, i was looking forward to having some nice fuzzy action but plugged in, got a signal when bypassed, turned it on and got nothing, the led didn't turn on either, i am pretty sure i wired it correctly and my soldering skills, i think, are decent enough. here is the wiring diagram i used : http://diy.musikding.de/images/stories/facesi/facesiwire.pdf
and the schematic http://diy.musikding.de/images/stories/facesi/facesischalt.pdf
sorry they are in pdf but its all i have. I will post pictures of the guts hopefully tonight when i find a decent camera. Hopefully ug can help me fix it!
Quote by Pr0gNut
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#3
Quote by Invader Jim
is the red battery wire shorting to ground anywhere?


i don't think so, i forgot to mention im really not to electronically minded and only have recently started learning, this is the first pedal i built.
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#4
to test that, remove the battery and get an ohm meter. one probe to the + terminal of the battery clip and he other terminal to a grounded place in the circuit.

also test to see if the battery wires are well-connected to the board. you may not even be getting power to the board.
#5
i kinda made an advancement i was putting it all in the box in any old way (not attached to the drill holes) to get pictures and was taking out the circuit board stands and the led started lighting so put my guitar in and it worked fuzz as well. i think i navigated the fault to either the capacitor or the resistor, i have tried re-flowing the solder to non avail and cant think of anything else, i now cant get it to do anything again, so back to square 1, and i don't have a ohm meter or multimeter either.
Quote by Pr0gNut
How dare you get all philosophical with logic and reasoning! This UG Sir,where one must blindly yell out opinions then viciously attack anyone who disagrees with said opinions.
#6
well if you ever hope to build pedals and troubleshoot them when they dont work, a multimeter is a must. you can get a cheap digital meter for about 20 bucks from places like Harbor Freight.

you're pretty much stuck until you get one. meanwhile check all the solder joints to see if they are shiny and cone shaped. you'll have to check for cold joints visually since you dont have a meter.
#7
so iv got another update, put in a power supply and it made the diode start smoking i dont know if its my fault or not? i have reflowed all the joints still no luck, once i get a decent camera i will put the pics up, im desperate to get it running as iv never used a fuzz before. Any more suggestions are more than welcome!
Quote by Pr0gNut
How dare you get all philosophical with logic and reasoning! This UG Sir,where one must blindly yell out opinions then viciously attack anyone who disagrees with said opinions.
#9
im such a noob! the diode is in back to front, thanks,how would i remove it? could this make the circuit actually work?
Quote by Pr0gNut
How dare you get all philosophical with logic and reasoning! This UG Sir,where one must blindly yell out opinions then viciously attack anyone who disagrees with said opinions.
#10
is there any other way i could build this circuit without the diode? because i have just accidentally removed the bit the solder goes on think its called the pad? and the diode fell apart when i was removing it, i new i should have just bought a damn pedal instead of building.
Quote by Pr0gNut
How dare you get all philosophical with logic and reasoning! This UG Sir,where one must blindly yell out opinions then viciously attack anyone who disagrees with said opinions.
#11
well the easy way to remove it would be to heat up the solder pads and just pull out the leads while the solder is molten. better way to do it would involve a de-soldering braid or pump. removes the solder as you heat it, so its cleaner. shouldnt be hard to take out, its just like soldering except you take the part out instead of putting it in.
#12
Quote by rd94
is there any other way i could build this circuit without the diode? because i have just accidentally removed the bit the solder goes on think its called the pad? and the diode fell apart when i was removing it, i new i should have just bought a damn pedal instead of building.



you can fix it, follow the trace from the pad to the next closest component that's connected, stick the leg through the hole like usual, but bend the leg over so you can solder it to the other component. you'll have to buy a new diode.

edit: oh, and no, you can't build it without the diode, I believe the diode is being used to cause clipping in the signal, which equals fuzz. no diode = no fuzz. it would just be a clean boost.

and I just remembered I have a pic of a pcb where I had a solder pad come off.



in the upper center of the pic you'll see what I'm talking about.
Last edited by The4thHorsemen at Jun 12, 2010,
#13
Quote by rd94
is there any other way i could build this circuit without the diode? because i have just accidentally removed the bit the solder goes on think its called the pad? and the diode fell apart when i was removing it, i new i should have just bought a damn pedal instead of building.


No, you will have to get another diode and then connect the negative leg of the diode to C4
Quote by Kensai
You'll find whisky very different, but try it and you'll grow into it, soon you and whisky are one, but still two, lovers dancing across a frozen lake under moonlight, wrapped in honey and warmth.


Sums up whisky perfectly
#14
thanks for the replies, i will get a new diode and hopefully fix it, next time i will be buying a pedal instead of building.
Quote by Pr0gNut
How dare you get all philosophical with logic and reasoning! This UG Sir,where one must blindly yell out opinions then viciously attack anyone who disagrees with said opinions.
#15
^Yeah, but when you do build a pedal that does work, it's great sense of achievement.
Quote by Kensai
You'll find whisky very different, but try it and you'll grow into it, soon you and whisky are one, but still two, lovers dancing across a frozen lake under moonlight, wrapped in honey and warmth.


Sums up whisky perfectly
#16
the diode is just polarity protection, which isnt as crucial with transistors (unless you are using MOSFETs, which you arent). you can just leave it disconnected (do not jumper across it)
#17
Quote by Invader Jim
the diode is just polarity protection, which isnt as crucial with transistors (unless you are using MOSFETs, which you arent). you can just leave it disconnected (do not jumper across it)



ah, I didn't even look at the schematic, I just assumed it was a clipping diode from the distortion I built... now that I'm looking at the schematic, what's the point in that diode? it's preventing the signal from going to ground, which there would be no possibility of if that diode wasn't there in the first place. it's as if the diode said "haha, you can't get past me!" to which you reply "well, it couldn't get through that place if you weren't there anyways.

so why did they put it there? unless there's something I don't understand about diodes. how would it be important using MOSFETs?
#18
^ if you stuck in a power adapter with the wrong polarity, the power would get shunted to ground instead of going to the pedal. protects the components from being powered "backwards" so to speak.
#19
you talking about TS's fuzz? it's polarity protection. if the battery/power supply were ever put in backward, the diode essentially shorts the battery/power supply so that it wont fry the circuit.

the "parallel diode" type of protection is the bad type, for that very reason. I prefer putting the diode in series with the +V wire. does the same thing, but if the polarity is ever flipped, the prevents power from even getting outside the battery. If you were powering a circuit with only a 1.5v cell, then you couldnt use this method because of the voltage drop of the diode, which is anywhere from .3 to .7 volts depending on the type and material of the diode.

another type is like you'd find in a crybaby. They use a paralell 9.1v Zener diode after a 1k resistor. the resistor is for current limiting and the diode acts as a regulator. no matter what voltage you plug in, ther will NEVER be more than 9.1v after that diode. the rest goes to ground (this is why they used a current limiting resistor, to keep from frying the diode).

Zeners are very special in that they love to work in their reverse breakdown region (which is why you always hook up a Zener backward as compared to a regular diode). You can buy Zeners in all sorts of voltages, and when connected up properly, you can use them as simple passive regulators.
#21
right i have one more question, would it be possible to take out the ac adapter? it seems to be causing the problem i was moving it and the led came but everytime i move it again it turns off so i was thinking just take it out to make it a bit simpler
Quote by Pr0gNut
How dare you get all philosophical with logic and reasoning! This UG Sir,where one must blindly yell out opinions then viciously attack anyone who disagrees with said opinions.
#22
^I believe that is caused by a bad connection, reflow the solder joint again.
Quote by Kensai
You'll find whisky very different, but try it and you'll grow into it, soon you and whisky are one, but still two, lovers dancing across a frozen lake under moonlight, wrapped in honey and warmth.


Sums up whisky perfectly
#23
ok, so i rewired the adapter, because i noticed the wire was frayed not all making a connection, and now the led stays on when its turned on but still no sound when on, im going to try rewiring the footswitch and see if that works, if not im still screwed
Quote by Pr0gNut
How dare you get all philosophical with logic and reasoning! This UG Sir,where one must blindly yell out opinions then viciously attack anyone who disagrees with said opinions.