#1
Hi I was wondering... In funk guitar, people seem to use a continual strumming effect even when playing single note melodies... I was wondering quite how this is achieved without the other strings being strummed overpowering the notes desired?? Sorry if this seems a basic question but im usually a metaller or country player but have started to get into funk style music. An example off the top of my head would be the main riff in cant stop by the red hot chillis, in all live vids and in the music video John frusciante keeps a constant motion with his right hand, and it doesn't seem to be palm muting so i'm stumped... Any help?
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#2
You mute the unwanted strings with your fretting hand.
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#3
Yeah but how do you do it with a constant back and forth strumming motion and yet still allow notes to ring out clearly?
"I've Been Imitated So Well I've Heard People Copy My Mistakes"- Jimi Hendrix

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#4
It's all in the control of your fretting hand. Basically your picking hand is keeping a steady rhythm (usually in eighths or sixteenths, kind of like a drummers high hat) and your fretting hand is controlling the proper rhythm/syncopation by fretting the notes at the appropriate time.

As for single string notes, you are using your free fingers on your fretting hand (primarily your index in most cases) to mute the unused strings. This way you only hear the notes that you are supposed too and you also get that steady percussive rhythm mixed in with it.

I hope I was able to explain this clearly enough for you, good luck!
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#5
You just don't hit the strings ...

Not many funk players actually use the generic muted 16th note rhythm - it's more professional to only let the fretted notes sound out.
#6
Right Thank you everyone
"I've Been Imitated So Well I've Heard People Copy My Mistakes"- Jimi Hendrix

We're born to lose, so live to win
#7
Yeah, it's as simple as having a good muting technique. I like to play like that, it gives a real dirty feeling.
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#8
You either just strum but don't actually hit the strings, this let's you keep your hand moving like a metronome and also makes it so you can keep your hand in the right spot on the upbeat/downbeat to match with an up or downstroke (e.g. An 8th note rhythm might be G x G x C C x C. You would strum continually but only hit the strings Down (miss) Down (miss) Down (miss) Up (miss) Up.

Or if you want a percussive rhythmic sound -- exactly like KillRoy stated, like a hi-hat -- you just mute the strings when you don't want them to play. Your strum style can be anything from a full chord strum, to just continually strumming a single string, or a few.

I think Frusciante does both in Can't Stop, mostly missing the string, but muting for effect as well, listen and you can hear the mutes.