#1
ok im a week into summer, my plan is to practice 2-5 hours a day depending on how busy the day is, i want to get really good, but how long should i really practice.
what should i practice most on.
#2
Practice until your fingers or brains are tired. You should warm up for 20-30 minutes playing very simple things, no bends/stretches. Maybe learn some songs and jam those. Dedicate some time to learning theory and then try to apply what you've learned to the guitar. You can pretty much fill in the time with various exercises depending on what you want to improve on.
Oh yeah.

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EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#3
I say practice until you feel satisfied... it sounds kind of dumb, and obviously you should consider certain things... but just practice until you feel you did what you set out to do for the day.. obviously you wont be pro overnight so don't expect amazing things to happen right away...
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#4
Practice quality not quantity. Don't just practice scales for 5 hours because it'll make you better, you should practice a bit of everything just a little bit so you can get really good at a lot of things all at once.
Oct. 20th, 2009: New guitar AND front row for Mars Volta.

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#5
nothing in specifics on what to practice on because thats all up to you. but learn different techniques and fuse them with what you know already. as for being good over the summer, it depends on how you measure good. one thing that will help you get good is alternative picking and string skipping. but make sure that you have good muting as well. or it will sound sloppy which is a very hard habit to get out of.
#6
Quote by ehlert99
I say practice until you feel satisfied... it sounds kind of dumb, and obviously you should consider certain things... but just practice until you feel you did what you set out to do for the day.. obviously you wont be pro overnight so don't expect amazing things to happen right away...
Yeah I agree
#7
It's summertime, so make sure you get outdoors yeah?

As well as having the general goal of being a "good guitarist", set lots of smaller ones too. Can you play a complete song from start to end? Can you strum and change chords in time? Do you know how to pick the key of a song? Lots of little things contribute to the bigger picture of being "good".
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#8
Thought of keeping a practice journal? You can write stupid stuff in it about how fast you alt picked today...and look back on it later for motivation, and it also helps you learn practice discipline. You can also keep a short one hour routine logged in it, so you can consistently practice what you want to improve on...I've done this before and it helped me out a lot, and it's cool to see how far I've progressed in a month or w/e
#9
I feel it is more effective to practice only one thing at a time until you can do it perfectly, rather than lots of different things in one practice session, week, month, whatever.
#10
I was going to mention the practice journal thing too ahah. But seriously, you should have a little journal with goals that you want to complete. Be it big goals or small goals, and then design a practice routine that's going to help achieve these goals. But also make sure to leave some room in there for some fun songs you like to play. It will help keep you motivated.
"Forget the rules. If it sounds good, it is good."
-Eddie Van Halen
#11
Check this out.

1. Pick out some of your favorite guitarists and decide what techniques you'd like to borrow from them. If you like Eddie, you'll want to work on your tapping and whammy bar tricks. If you like Jimmy Page, you'd want to work on your pentatonic and blues scales, if you like Steve Howe, you'd want to work on your fingerpicking, etc. Isolate the techniques you want to know.
2. Design a practice schedule. Your schedule's length should be one you won't have a problem following every day - consistency is key.
3. Pick topics that overlap. For instance, if you want to work on your legato playing, use legato during all your scales practice. If you want to work on your economy picking, practice scales with three notes per string patterns. If you want to work on your tapping, practice your arpeggios on a single string. Be analytical here and decide how to make the best use of your time.
4. Practice at a speed where you can play your exercises perfectly. That means no buzzing noises, no missed notes, totally synced to the rhythm, and staying relaxed and not wasting motion. Do it like this and the accuracy & speed come naturally.

That's it. I can't get any more specific than that since I don't know what styles of music you're into.
#12
Just practice man ...
what else ??
there are no rules in that .
you just play until you want to , thats it .
and practice whatever you wanna learn ..