#1
Hello everyone. I've been trying to learn to play guitar for about four or five years now. I had a teacher for a while, but ti didn't seem to pan out in my way of thinking, and he mostly seemed interested on teaching different patterns(Hard to clarify, but I don't mean useful ones, at least when you're not accustomed to how a scale should be in general), so, I come before all of you in this community with the knowledge. I'll post what I've been trying to understand so far, and I'm still a bit of a novice when it comes to theory, so, be gentle!


+ Form (going to the right)

Note: 1/8 are the same note, different pitch

MAJOR:
1 2 3/4 5 6 7/8

DORIAN:
1 2/3 4 5 6/7 8

PHRYGIAN:
1/2 3 4 5/6 7 8

LYDIAN:
1 2 3 4/5 6 7 8

MIXOLYDIAN:
1 2 3/4 5 6/7 8

AEOLIAN(Minor):
1 2/3 4 5/6 7 8

LOCRIAN:
1/2 3 4/5 6 7 8

--------------------------------------

- Form (to the left)

MAJOR:
1/2 3 4 5/6 7 8

DORIAN:
1 2/3 4 5 6/7 8

PHRYGIAN:
1 2 3/4 5 6 7/8

LYDIAN:
1 2 3 4/5 6 7 8

MIXOLYDIAN:
1 2/3 4 5/6 7 8

AEOLIAN(Minor):
1 2 3/4 5 6/7 8

LOCRIAN:
1 2 3 4/5 6 7/8

I seem to have difficulty understanding any other lessons or such, and starting off with learning my patterns(if these are correct) has helped immensely. Pentatonics were actually the first I learned, much thanks and credit due to Mr. Angus Young. Anyways, any other advice, etc, to give, feel free, especially on anything concerning flats, double flats, etc. I did purposley take those out mainly to help avoid the barrier in them I couldn't break through. Thanks beforehand!
#4
I'd focus on the major scale first, so you get to really understand it. You can derive pretty much any scale you'll ever need from the major scale, so once you've got that nailed you've done the hardest part.

Plus, scales are only any use to you if you can use them, so you might as well learn one really well and get confident using it before you worry about any of the others
#5
Quote by zhilla
I'd focus on the major scale first, so you get to really understand it. You can derive pretty much any scale you'll ever need from the major scale, so once you've got that nailed you've done the hardest part.

Plus, scales are only any use to you if you can use them, so you might as well learn one really well and get confident using it before you worry about any of the others


Ya, been working on that as well. I have my major and minor pents down pretty ok, except for - form. Its always compensating for the b string that I have so much trouble with.
J Rocker
#6
I think the B string throws everyone to start with - don't worry, you get used to it
#7
Quote by SakuraInjektion
Ya, been working on that as well. I have my major and minor pents down pretty ok, except for - form. Its always compensating for the b string that I have so much trouble with.

Learning where to play a scale is only a tiny part of learning it though, what's far more important is learning how it works and how it can be used.
Seriously, forget modes for the time being, they're not going to be of any use to you yet and you won't be in a position to understand them properly for some time. also when it comes to it the easiest way to understand them is simply by how they differ from the major scale, which also helps you understand when they apply. Just immerse yourself in the major scale for the time being and absorb all you can about it.

Also, what's this "form - to the left" bollocks? There's absolutely nothing useful to be gained from looking at things that way. The numbers have a descriptive purpose, they refer to scale degrees - reversing them is going to do nothing other than confuse you. Besides, when it comes to actually using a scale you're constantly moving backwards and forwards from and to different notes within that scale. Understanding that the major scale is WWHWWWH tells you everything you'll ever need to know. You already know there's an octave either side and that the pattern repeats so if you're moving up one note from a root you can see it's a whole step, if you're moving down from the root it's a half step. You're probably also making things confusing by mixing up the steps way of scale spelling with the interval way.

For example
the major scale is the steps WWHWWWH, the interval spelling is 1 2 3 4 5 6 7.
natural minor scale the steps are WHWWHWW, the interval spelling is 1 2 b3 5 6 b7

from the steps you can see it's exactly the same overall pattern, just starting from the 6th degree - the interval spelling shows it differs from the major scale by having a flattened 3rd and 7th. If you want to combine the two then do that, combine them.

eg for the major scale
1   2   3 4   5   6   7
  W   W  H  W   W   W  H

The way you're trying to view them makes everything seem a little too isolated and arbitrary. It's important to understand how scales function individually, but understanding the relationships between them helps you get there quicker.
Actually called Mark!

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Last edited by steven seagull at Jun 12, 2010,