#1
hey guys, i'm new on these forums and I wanted to ask for some tips for improvisation soloing. I've been practicing this for a while, but I can't think of any ideas. I've learned the 5 minor penatonic boxes.

When i play, the only thing I can think of is going up and down the scale, which doesn't sound that good, and when I think of something new, I just play that a lot

so what are some tips for creating new licks to do in improvisation soloing

Thanks
#2
Focus on hearing the notes as you play them. Don't just play random notes, that's pretty pointless. Play the simplest phrases you can think of and over time, you'll become more familiar with the sounds of the scale.

Then learn the major scale, too.
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A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
Last edited by hockeyplayer168 at Jun 12, 2010,
#3
Practice, practice, practice. You'll get better at improvising the more you do it.

+1 to the major scale as well, but don't rush into it too soon. Spend some time with the pentatonic scale and get really familiar with it and really familiar with improvising with it. It'll help a lot when you are ready to jump into the major scale and start getting into the beefy stuff.
#5
im in the same boat as you. my problem is when i improvise, it just sounds like im going up and down the blues scale. im currently trying to get used to the major scale, i guess it's just practice. hearing a lot of music also helps
#6
Noodle to YouTube backing tracks, figure out what do you want to express with the solo
#7
Start skipping notes in the scale or skipping entire strings, eventually you'll find small groups of notes that sound good together without sounding like you're running up and down a scale.

Oooh also phrasing is important too!
#9
I think a good way to practice is to think of a short tune in your head, and then try to play it on guitar. Eventually you'll be able to play them just as you think of them.
#10
Quote by TH3M4PPL3S_
sorry, but what is phrasing


Think of it as the way you place the notes as well as what notes you play, the way your place notes in terms of rhythm is much more important than the notes you choose in my opinion. The actual choice of notes does also make up part of phrasing but rhythm is the main part of it.

also if you're stuck for ideas there are 3 things I recommend:

1 - Listen to more music outside of your "comfort zone", that is if you're a metalhead listen to more jazz and blues, if you're a blueser listen to more metal, if you're anyone who doesn't like country listen to more country players. There are a huge wealth of different approaches to the guitar and to cut yourself off from one of them because it's not something you listen to all the time is silly.

2 - Take a player you like and really break their playing apart, look at their solos and truy to figure out what kinds of sequences and licks they use most often, if you can get into the mentality of another player you can make yourself sound like them relatively easily.

3 - Stop playing what you know and really start to listen to everything you do; don't allow your fingers to fall into the same old patterns you know but really think about what sound you want to achieve next, the most important thing you have to do is figure out what you want your notes to say, from there you work backwards and apply technique to the ideas.
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#11
You could try to find some lessons on youtube. But the best way to learn this is probably just by listening to what you're doing, and try not to run through the scales to often.
#12
At the off, it's a good idea to aim for chord tones, and maintain a close relationship primarily to the root, and after that to the fourth and fifth.

The root note is your safe note. Often, when improvising, something that you don't like the sound of will slip out. A calm slide down or a quick scale run back to the root note could well be your saving grace.
#13
And seriously, if you expect to just pick up a guitar and come up with tasteful licks we haven't heard before, you're in for a painful experience.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#14
no, i know that guitar takes a VERY long time to play good, just wanted some tips

Anyways, thanks for the help guys!

P.S. i'm new here, so can i add some of you as my friends?
#15
what helps is practice. Use ever technique u know to add. Also know ur scales like the back of your hand inside and out.
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#16
Quote by silly6-string
what helps is practice. Use ever technique u know to add. Also know ur scales like the back of your hand inside and out.


That is, in my opinion, bad advice. There's nothing that will kill a solo like trying to shoehorn in technique because you know how to use it. Note choice and phrasing comes first, technique is subservient to those ends.
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#17
look at videos of other people improvising on youtube. then try and copy their licks. even if u cant play the same lick exactly like them, u'll create something new. also do some bends and slides.
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#18
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
That is, in my opinion, bad advice. There's nothing that will kill a solo like trying to shoehorn in technique because you know how to use it. Note choice and phrasing comes first, technique is subservient to those ends.

+1

Techniques are just a way to move from one note to the next, they've got no inherent worth when it comes to music. If you aren't making a considered choice as to what note to use then how you transition to it becomes moot.
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#19
Quote by TH3M4PPL3S_
hey guys, i'm new on these forums and I wanted to ask for some tips for improvisation soloing. I've been practicing this for a while, but I can't think of any ideas. I've learned the 5 minor penatonic boxes.

When i play, the only thing I can think of is going up and down the scale, which doesn't sound that good, and when I think of something new, I just play that a lot

so what are some tips for creating new licks to do in improvisation soloing

Thanks


I came across a video a while ago that helped me out a lot, it's from a jazz pianist but the concepts are universal...he'll not make any sense till about 4:15 or so, but don't skip ahead because it won't make any sense otherwise
http://www.youtube.com/user/JazzVideoGuy#p/search/8/y_7DgCrziI8