Page 1 of 2
#1
im going to get a boat one of these days (possibly today)

from my grandad.

its nothing big, its a 8-10 foot aluminum boat with a small electric motor that seats two people with fishing gear.

im getting this thing for free, just because i was looking for one and my grandfather cant use it so he offered me it.

which leads me to the point of the thread, i was thinking about this thing and a friend told me "i need to name it", which i dont understand. why do people name there boats? and does it apply to all boats or just bigger boats?

also if it applies to my boat any name suggestions are welcome.

tl;dr: why do people name boats, and does it apply to certain boats only?
rise against fan

Quote by Andrea55
My favorite anteater.


Quote by trueamerican
Not only do you have good taste in music, but you have good taste in politics
#2
tradition
Quote by guitarhero_764
I think you need to stop caring what people think about it. I stayed home all day today and masturbated like 5 times. Fucking blast.

Ibanez ATK300 ◈ Sansamp VT Bass ◈ EHX Nano Small Stone ◈ Hartke LH500 ◈ Ashdown/Celestion 115
#3
Because when your boat sinks it's far more convenient to say 'this is the Captain of the Spotted Kebab' than 'this is the captain of...umm, well it's about ten feet long, aluminium, the paint's slightly flaking on the starboard side...are you with me?' when calling the coastguard.
Quote by ozzyismetal
Neopowell, that's because you are a pumped-up sex offender.
Quote by Kensai
You're exactly the kind of person who'd have sex in a bar drunk
Quote by Zero-Hartman
You're a terrible, terrible man. This is a new middle for you.

I write things. You can read them.Essay on UK student riots
#7
A personal connection with the object moreso than with other objects.

And because they get lonely once their wives divorce them because they've been on the damn boat all day, every day :P
#8
Its an old tradition


It has to be a ladies name though, or something nautical themed..... or it just sounds weird
Come back if you want to
And remember who you are
‘Cause there's nothing here for you my dear
And everything must pass
#9
Because one day, people got sick of carrying their boats under their arm so they could point to it if they ever wanted to refer to it, and one genius, one visionary, said "maybe we could make noises with our mouths to indicate the concept of our particular boat". People laughed at him, because his idea of using words was so revolutionary, so alien to the people of that time. "There goes old Jimmy Boat-Namer, with his ludicrous ideas", they would say, or at least they would have if they had words for any of those things. But, as the years rolled by more and more people began to see the sense in his theory, until today it has become commonplace.
I'LL PUNCH A DONKEY IN THE STREETS OF GALWAY
Last edited by whalepudding at Jun 13, 2010,
#11
Quote by Nickpocalypse
A personal connection with the object moreso than with other objects.

And because they get lonely once their wives divorce them because they've been on the damn boat all day, every day :P



ah so its like how everyone who uses my pickup truck calls it diablo.


that second part of your post reminded me of brad paisleys song im gonna miss her
rise against fan

Quote by Andrea55
My favorite anteater.


Quote by trueamerican
Not only do you have good taste in music, but you have good taste in politics
#12
So you can shout out its name when you're molesting it.

Quote by hazzmatazz
youmakemesmile...

Quote by sebastian_96
Today I stole a girls tampons for being such an annoying bitch.





MUFC


My love for you
Is like a truck
Berserker.
#13
Why do people name their guitars? Makes it feel personal. Same with boats.
#16
old tradition. in the old days where there was still slavery, and india still belonged to the west and stuff, captains spent years on their ship out on the sea. through lots of hard times and bad storms. so they started to love their ships. so they gave em names to love. so you know, capt. blackbeard called his betty or something, while capt. Glenn Fairydust called his Eric or something
#17
It's more than tradition- it's superstition.

A boat that is blessed is less likely to encounter the wrath of angry Gods. Naming something is part of a blessing. As is human sacrifice on the longboat of Vikings. Or in our case, breaking a bottle of champagne on it's bow. It's something that has been happening since at least Ancient Greek times.
#18
i thought it was like the registration on a car... a name for a boat so it can be identified as to who the owner is incase it breaks some marine laws...

but i am probably wrong, as usual.
Belief is a beautiful armour but makes for the heaviest sword.
#19
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It's more than tradition- it's superstition.

A boat that is blessed is less likely to encounter the wrath of angry Gods. Naming something is part of a blessing. As is human sacrifice on the longboat of Vikings. Or in our case, breaking a bottle of champagne on it's bow. It's something that has been happening since at least Ancient Greek times.


That sounds awfully lot like tradition.
Quote by crazy8rgood

Oh, look at those naughty waffles and their banana's...

*fapfapfapfapfap*

(if this is against the rules, I'll take it down.)
#21
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It's more than tradition- it's superstition.

A boat that is blessed is less likely to encounter the wrath of angry Gods. Naming something is part of a blessing. As is human sacrifice on the longboat of Vikings. Or in our case, breaking a bottle of champagne on it's bow. It's something that has been happening since at least Ancient Greek times.

True.

Christening a boat was always seen as a way to protect men against the perils of the sea, which was treated with fear and superstition.
And Christening is actually a pagan tradition, which has carried into what later became called Christian times. Many pre-Christian cultures, like the Greeks, had gods that were devoted to protecting sailors.

Quote by Da Squiz
That sounds awfully lot like tradition.

It's become a tradition but it originates with superstition.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 13, 2010,
#26
Quote by Dan_5893
call it k-boat.




that sounds like a good/bad name
rise against fan

Quote by Andrea55
My favorite anteater.


Quote by trueamerican
Not only do you have good taste in music, but you have good taste in politics
#31
bad luck to be sailing in a boat with no name
Gotta keep my eyes from the circling skies...
tounge tied and twisted just an earth bound misfit...

>CRYPTIC METAPHOR<


Quote by ilikepirates
ilikeyou.

not hated
#32
call it "no name"
"And after all of this, I am amazed...

...that I am cursed far more than I am praised."
#33
Sailors were very superstitious people, and by naming their boats it gave them moar confidence to sail.
#34
Giving a boat or ship a name is a centuries old tradition that started out of a combination of fear and superstition. As history proves, the oceans and seas of the world are well known for their treacherous storms, claiming the life of many a sailor. Early Europeans believed that naming and blessing a boat in honor of the God that was popular at the given time, protected them from potential harm while at sea.


Google. It's your friend.
#36
Its probly the only way I can be Captian of the Universe. That's why I named my boat.
#39
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It's more than tradition- it's superstition.

A boat that is blessed is less likely to encounter the wrath of angry Gods. Naming something is part of a blessing. As is human sacrifice on the longboat of Vikings. Or in our case, breaking a bottle of champagne on it's bow. It's something that has been happening since at least Ancient Greek times.


The ancient Greeks, more advanced than we thought - crafting bottles of fine champagne thousands of years ago
My God, it's full of stars!
#40
Quote by Dreadnought
The ancient Greeks, more advanced than we thought - crafting bottles of fine champagne thousands of years ago

Take that, France!
Page 1 of 2