#1
Okay, so first of all to start off I'll explain the idea.
In school I do CCEA [A Northern Ireland examination board] GCSE [A type of Qualification for the UK and Ireland] Technology and Design and I had the idea for my practical work to make a Guitar Amplifier, then my teacher suggested maybe a pocket amp, so I took a look at different tutorials and stuff for amps but now I'm a bit confused...

Just as a note
-I think my teacher wants us all to use an IC (Integrated Circuit) in our projects, but I'l have to ask him to be sure.

So I'd like to ask these questions of you;

1. Has anyone here ever made one themselves? Would it be very difficult to do?
2. I'm a bit confused about the whole Valves or Solid State thing, which would be best? (I'd like there to be an Overdrive setting on this amp, would that mean I'd need/be best of using Valves)?

If I can think of any more questions I may add them here, too.

Thanks in advance for any and all help


Oh yeah, and I had accidentally posted this in the wrong section, so I deleted it and I'm posting it here, instead...

Oh, and an EDIT:
Apparently (from the last thread) the idea of using Valves is stupid... So that I amy learn from this, can someone explain why?
jfreyvogel is a legend.

Quote by dudetheman
I am so goddamn high right now....

...and I'm watching my balls. Seriously guys, have you ever noticed that your balls actually MOVE? They like, breathe. It's weird as hell.....
Last edited by cloudintheskies at Jun 13, 2010,
#3
Quote by Jak Archer
Another great example is Cathbard's 5F1 Fender Champ.

https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1297056


So I could possibly do the same as that, but make small case and stick a speaker in it?
Or would I be best off learning about Solid State stuff?
jfreyvogel is a legend.

Quote by dudetheman
I am so goddamn high right now....

...and I'm watching my balls. Seriously guys, have you ever noticed that your balls actually MOVE? They like, breathe. It's weird as hell.....
#4
valves are smaller than tubes, so they wouldn't be as stupid as putting a pair of KT88's in and old shoebox, but they're still a little too big to be practical. solid state is the way to go, for overdrive maybe you could gut and compact a pedal of BOSS like design.
#5
Quote by EFGuitar
valves are smaller than tubes, so they wouldn't be as stupid as putting a pair of KT88's in and old shoebox, but they're still a little too big to be practical. solid state is the way to go, for overdrive maybe you could gut and compact a pedal of BOSS like design.


Lol, £65 for the pedal...
I think I'll just rip apart my brother's Marshall MS-2 and hope he never notices... *shifty eyes*

That is, if I can find it, or he hasn't chucked it out...
jfreyvogel is a legend.

Quote by dudetheman
I am so goddamn high right now....

...and I'm watching my balls. Seriously guys, have you ever noticed that your balls actually MOVE? They like, breathe. It's weird as hell.....
Last edited by cloudintheskies at Jun 13, 2010,
#6
http://www.indy-guitarist.com/inc/sdetail/101

this will teach you about using transistors and other components in effects circuits. In the JFET section, there's a schematic for a Vox (AC-30 i want to say) style amplifier using JFETS instead of tubes. You can also use your new-found knowledge to make an overdrive circuit.
#7
You could make a ruby or little gem amp, they're all the rage these days. Both are battery powered, and are .5 watts.

http://runoffgroove.com/ruby.html
http://runoffgroove.com/littlegem.html

(I'm building a ruby atm. )

I honestly wouldn't make a tube amp for a first amp build, tubes usually sound better then a solid state, but at low voltage and with crappy speakers, you probably won't notice the difference. Plus they're kinda big, compared to the components on a solid state. Probably won't fit in your pocket too well. And are more expensive.

Quote by cloudintheskies
Lol, £65 for the pedal...
I think I'll just rip apart my brother's Marshall MS-2 and hope he never notices... *shifty eyes*

That is, if I can find it, or he hasn't chucked it out...


I believe Marshall has they're name printed on all of their circuit boards; all he'd have to do is open it up to know you took the electronics out of a mini-marshall.
Last edited by SlayingDragons at Jun 13, 2010,
#8
Quote by SlayingDragons

I believe Marshall has they're name printed on all of their circuit boards; all he'd have to do is open it up to know you took the electronics out of a mini-marshall.


Yeah, I'll just take a look inside it then, I can easily get any components I need and can make a PCB with the CNC Machine (Y)
jfreyvogel is a legend.

Quote by dudetheman
I am so goddamn high right now....

...and I'm watching my balls. Seriously guys, have you ever noticed that your balls actually MOVE? They like, breathe. It's weird as hell.....
#9
Quote by cloudintheskies
Yeah, I'll just take a look inside it then, I can easily get any components I need and can make a PCB with the CNC Machine (Y)


If you want, Invader Jim gave me a nifty little schematic to the marshall MS-2, I could give it to you.
#10
Quote by EFGuitar
valves are smaller than tubes, so they wouldn't be as stupid as putting a pair of KT88's in and old shoebox, but they're still a little too big to be practical. solid state is the way to go, for overdrive maybe you could gut and compact a pedal of BOSS like design.

wat
#11
Quote by EFGuitar
valves are smaller than tubes


Valves is the British term for tubes.
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Sums up whisky perfectly
#12
There is no way you will be able to incorparate tubes or valves (same thing). To use them properly (i.e. not starved plate mode) you would need in excess of 100VDC in your amp (probably disallowed for School Projects, safety issue), and i doubt you will fit 2 large transformers in your pocket.

I would reccomend a simple preamp into an even simpler IC power amp. A chip I might reccomend for this is the TDA7267 (I think) by ST. You used to be able to sample it for free, but I think they stopped shipping free samples to some home addresses, and you will need a company e-mail address, because it blocks things like hotmail. A school E-mail might work.

I can't recall if this violates some rule, so if it does, mods please delete, but there is another forum where the people generally have more electronics expertise at http://www.ssguitar.com/ . Many people on there have undertaken similar projects.

Edit: You may be able to incorporate Subminiature tubes in your design. These are quite small and would allow you to port some classic tube amplifier designs directly across, though
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Last edited by nickbob00 at Jun 14, 2010,
#13
there are tons of schematics for guitar pocket amps out there. the ruby or little gem as mentioned earlier would be a nice choice for someone starting out.

however, if i was doing this and wanted a good grade, i would create my own modified version of something. just building something with 10 or 15 parts that is completly based on an online schematic is boring anyway.

for example you could add in a low pass and high pass filter to give yourself a two band EQ. shows some initiative, and you would have to do a little design work that would impress your teacher.
#14
Quote by nickbob00
There is no way you will be able to incorparate tubes or valves (same thing). To use them properly (i.e. not starved plate mode) you would need in excess of 100VDC in your amp (probably disallowed for School Projects, safety issue), and i doubt you will fit 2 large transformers in your pocket.



http://beavisaudio.com/projects/TubeCricket/