#1
people keep telling me i need to learn all the notes on the fretboard, i know i have to but i have no idea how to do it.

if somebody points out a fret to me, i can figure out what note it is, but i want to be able to know it without going up a scale.

any ideas?
#2
Pick a string and roll a 12 sided die to test yourself.
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#3
Well you could always just memorize a fretboard chart. Some do that. I would recommend that you look at the scales and in particular the chromatic scale, that is the scale of all the tones. That will make it easy to memorize the fretboard. Starting on the low E string for example:

Open - E
1st fret - F
2nd fret - F#/Gb
3rd fret - G

etc.

This can get very monotonous though. Like everything else everyone has a different way. I would personally recommend learning all the major scales and notes they contain and play them and say the notes out loud as you play them taking note as to what fret each note falls on. Remember that the notes on the high e string are the same as on the low E string as well and that everything starts over at the 12th fret. Knowing this helps a little. This is how I did it. Have a look at www.all-guitar-chords.com and check out their scale shapes and such.
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#4
Learn a string or two at a time. Just go up the string, thinking about what each note is and memorising either the notes where the inlays are, or just all the natural notes.
To really commit them to memory start thinking about them when you're playing. Every time you play something on a string you've learnt/ are learning think about what note it is. After a while it'll just come to you.
Rules on where octaves and unison notes lie on the neck help too as a quick reference.
#5
The first thing is to learn the 12 notes in an octave(Am, A, Bm, B, C, Dm, D, Em, E, F, Gm, G).

Then consider the strings of a guitar. E, A, D, G, B, e...

Each fret is one note, so if you hold the E string on the first fret, it's an F, second fret, Gm, third fret, G, and so on.............. It's a lot to remember on the fly, but at the very least you should be able to deduce which note is which if you have to.
#6
When I was learning the fretboard, I used to use an exercise called Find Note x. Start off with A. Find all the As on the 6th string. Move to the 5th string and repeat. 4th string and so on. Now, let's find the Bs. Repeat as before. Cs and so on... After doing this for a few months (yes, it will take awhile to learn them), mix it up and pick strings and notes at random. When that starts to become easier, start adding in the sharps and flats. Before too long, you will have memorized the notes on the entire neck. That's what I did and it worked for me. Eventually, you can start working this routine into your lead practice sessions. As you're playing some lead stuff, stop on a note and quickly, in your mind, say the note. Without missing too many beats and making it sound obvious that you're lost, find the same note elsewhere on the neck and pick up playing again. This is what I do and these are the exercises I recommend to my students.
#7
Quote by KG6_Steven
As you're playing some lead stuff, stop on a note and quickly, in your mind, say the note. Without missing too many beats and making it sound obvious that you're lost, find the same note elsewhere on the neck and pick up playing again.


This is one of the best ideas I've heard for helping learn notes and just generally good practice for messing around with licks.
#8
I am working on this too, I found a really good site where it will pretty much show you a note on the fretboard, and you have to guess what it is...

go to musictheory.net and click exercises. Click the circle next to Fretboard Identification, scroll down, set the settings how you want them, then click start exercise at the bottom.

Keep practicing at that a ton, plus what everyone else suggested and you'll learn it in no time!
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#9
my opinion is when play something name each note you play and memorise without straining yourself
#10
Quote by Bergey
The first thing is to learn the 12 notes in an octave(Am, A, Bm, B, C, Dm, D, Em, E, F, Gm, G).


...what? i'm guessing you mean Ab by 'Am' and so on.

how do you memorize anything? by repetitious, conscious practice.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#11
Quote by AeolianWolf
...what? i'm guessing you mean Ab by 'Am' and so on.

how do you memorize anything? by repetitious, conscious practice.

Yeah, that's what I meant.... I kind of write them interchangeably... I see "m" I think "minor" so....
#12
Quote by Bergey
Yeah, that's what I meant.... I kind of write them interchangeably... I see "m" I think "minor" so....


...that makes no sense. Am is a chord. Ab is a note.
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#13
Quote by ApeWeevil
This is one of the best ideas I've heard for helping learn notes and just generally good practice for messing around with licks.



Thanks. Another variation of that exercise is to say each note in your head as your practicing your licks, or lead. Yes, it can be done. When you can do that as the notes are flying, that's when you know you've got the neck memorized.
#14
Quote by KG6_Steven
Thanks. Another variation of that exercise is to say each note in your head as your practicing your licks, or lead. Yes, it can be done. When you can do that as the notes are flying, that's when you know you've got the neck memorized.

I just learn the notes on the frets with markers on(notes on the 3rd, 5th, 7th, 9th, 12th and so on) and work out the rest from them.
The Metal Scale:
e----------------------000
B------------------000----
G--------------000--------
D----------000------------
A------000----------------
E--000--------------------
#15
I did it in chunks of the board. First frets 1-3 on all the strings, then 4-6, etc. You only have to get up to 11 so it ends up being like 3 or 4 bite size pieces.
#17
I started by using a simple scale, like the minor pentatonic I think, learned all the notes for the different positions and then filled in the blanks, saying out loud the note I was playing. This also helped with improvisation and getting used to moving around when playing lead guitar.

I then repeated the steps for different keys and different scales, the major/minor, at around the same time I'm pretty sure I added the chromatic scale to my practice routine to really set it in concrete.

Comokanu also points out another good technique, learning the notes at each dot and knowing how to move forward and backward toward the next dot.
#18
I'm trying to spend alot of time learning the fretboard at the moment too. The fact that I haven't already is really holding me back. My technique is ok it's just scales and theory and stuff I need to work on.

What I am doing is find all of the E's between open and 12th fret over all six strings. Then find all of the e sharps, then f's. All the way up to E again. Only been doing it a couple of days and it's working really well!
#19
i memorised the first 2 and the last 2 strings...for the middle two, i kinda visualise the octaves
#20
I just learned the notes on the low E (E, F, F#, G, G#, A, A#, B, C, C#, D, D# and E again). Once you know them in the correct order like that, you know where the notes are on all the other strings as well.
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#21
What i did was to draw a chart out on a piece of paper (1st column for E 2nd for A etc)
Then go downwards with a row for each fret. Then fill in the notes and colour the same notes in (E orange, F red or something) you only need to go to 12, because then it repeats.
The stick it so you can see it when you play and you'll soon remember them.
#22
Start by finding each notre on each string. Say play an A n every string and as you play through it, say the note name and try to pitch it (if possible, the pitch doesnt have to be in same octave you're singing) this will help you innternalize it.

Then look into the CAGED system, knowing chords in many positions of the fretboard will do wonders for your mastering of the fretboard
#23
Quote by Professor Grill
What I am doing is find all of the E's between open and 12th fret over all six strings. Then find all of the e sharps, then f's.


My name is Tom, feel free to use it.
#24
Quote by Prophet of Page

That's what I was thinking lol.
#25
I learn them a string at a time by looking at a chart, then moving to a random fret and recalling it, or start with a random note and find the fret.

Eventually you'll learn them with ease
#27
Quote by Cisc
Ah the elusive E sharp..

Sounds like a nature film - "Let's observe the E sharp in its natural habitat."
#28
Learn the CAGED system, you'll learn the notes and why they are where they are.