#1
When you are playing an arpeggio over a dominant 7th chord, can't you use a minor third as a 'blue' note, like to slide up to the major third or slide down or whatnot? I can't remember...
#2
I'm going to make this my new saying since I've said it so many times now:

Who's going to stop you? The music police?

And really, it could be a red note or whatever color note you want it to be.
#3
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I'm going to make this my new saying since I've said it so many times now:

Who's going to stop you? The music police?

And really, it could be a red note or whatever color note you want it to be.

I was actually refering (sp?) to a blue note as in a blues scale...
and thanks for you advice, but I was actually wondering as it pertains to actual music theory. personally I love the way it sounds and I will continue to do it as I please.
Last edited by emily92 at Jun 14, 2010,
#4
Quote by emily92
I was actually refering (sp?) to a blue note as in a blues scale...

I know. But the "blue" note would be the b5 or the "Blue Third" inbetween the major and minor 3rd.

It doesn't really matter what you call it though... you can DEFINITELY do anything you want to do. That's the beauty of music.
#5
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I know. But the "blue" note would be the b5 or the "Blue Third" inbetween the major and minor 3rd.

It doesn't really matter what you call it though... you can DEFINITELY do anything you want to do. That's the beauty of music.

I know, that's the way I think too, but I was wondering how people would look at it in a theory class
#6
Quote by emily92
I know, that's the way I think too, but I was wondering how people would look at it in a theory class

I would just call it a non-chord tone. Most probably just a passing tone or something similar to that.
#7
Quote by DiminishedFifth
I would just call it a non-chord tone. Most probably just a passing tone or something similar to that.

ok thank you
#8
If you played the 9th before the minor third it would be a chromatic passing note. If not then it would just be an appogiatura/accicatura depending how you played it.
#9
Quote by griffRG7321
If you played the 9th before the minor third it would be a chromatic passing note. If not then it would just be an appogiatura/accicatura depending how you played it.

See, I was going to say appoggiatura, but then I remembered it's approach by leap, left by step in the OPPOSITE direction... If he's doing an arpeggio and going 1 b3 3 5 b7 that doesn't fit the name.
#10
Quote by DiminishedFifth
See, I was going to say appoggiatura, but then I remembered it's approach by leap, left by step in the OPPOSITE direction... If he's doing an arpeggio and going 1 b3 3 5 b7 that doesn't fit the name.


An appogiatura doesn't have to be approached by leap, although when it is approached by step it could be described as an accented passing tone. Either way it all depends how the TS plays it. It's neither an appogiatura or an accented passing tone if it doesn't occur on a strong beat.

Neither does an appogiatura need to resolve in the opposite direction, i think your thinking of changing notes.
#11
Quote by griffRG7321
An appogiatura doesn't have to be approached by leap, although when it is approached by step it could be described as an accented passing tone. Either way it all depends how the TS plays it. It's neither an appogiatura or an accented passing tone if it doesn't occur on a strong beat.

Neither does an appogiatura need to resolve in the opposite direction, i think your thinking of changing notes.

Huh. I always learned that Escape Tone and Appoggiatura both resolved by leap/step (respectively) in the opposite direction.

I'll take your word for it.

Cause I, honestly, don't know what I'd call it aside from a non-chord tone. Appoggiatura does seem best though.
#12
Quote by emily92
When you are playing an arpeggio over a dominant 7th chord, can't you use a minor third as a 'blue' note, like to slide up to the major third or slide down or whatnot? I can't remember...



yes, ofcourse. You can play a chromatic leading tone before any chord tone. The fact that it's the minor 3rd is irrelevant in this case (because of the context). Apply the same idea to any other chord tone for a similar result.

if you were to hang on the minor 3rd, then it would function as a #9 as supported by the dominant chord.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 14, 2010,