#1
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basically i've been learning my 7th chords lately and c7 doesn't contain four notes, eh?
am i missing something?
#3
wouldn't it be a Cadd7 or something if it had four notes?

Edit: I guess there's no such thing as add7
Last edited by sidebuster at Jun 14, 2010,
#5
schism, that's usually how i play it, even if it may not be technically correct. You really just need that B flat to get that 7th sound.
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#6
Quote by g_tab_man
schism, that's usually how i play it, even if it may not be technically correct. You really just need that B flat to get that 7th sound.


the thing is every guitar site i use when i'm not sure about chords has it listed as this and it's literally drove me insane until i posted this.

if it's not correct why do multiple sites have it that way?
#7
Quote by mishax92
Theyre both C7

C7 contains the notes C, E, G and Bb. As long as you have those 4 (each note can appear more than once) then its a C7.


there's no G in that chord
#8
Quote by sidebuster
wouldn't it be a Cadd7 or something if it had four notes?


You can't have an "add 7" due to 7 being the first interval in the adding sequence (7, 9, 11, 13, etc) From 9 onwards you can have "add X" chords.

Basically, "add X" means add ONLY that interval, whereas seeing C9 for example, means include the 7th and the 9th;

i.e.

C9 = C E G Bb and D

Cadd9 = C E G and D
#9
Quote by schism8
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basically i've been learning my 7th chords lately and c7 doesn't contain four notes, eh?
am i missing something?
This is the most common C7 shape. There is nothing wrong with it.
#10
Quote by schism8
there's no G in that chord


The fifth is an insignificant interval, and can be removed without altering the chord's overall tonality.
#11
+1 to mishax

The only thing you need to create that "7-sound" is a root and the tension(b5 interval) between the major third and septim
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#12
Quote by schism8
there's no G in that chord

The 5th of a chord is never necessary, unless a chord explicitly lists it in the bass (2nd inversion)...it can be excluded and included as you see fit.

Quote by mishax92
Theyre both C7

C7 contains the notes C, E, G and Bb. As long as you have those 4 (each note can appear more than once) then its a C7.

Eh...yes, technically. I would advise attempting to avoid doubling the 3rd of the chord.
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#13
Quote by schism8
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basically i've been learning my 7th chords lately and c7 doesn't contain four notes, eh?
am i missing something?

We have C (the root), E (the 3rd), Bb (the 7th). Hence, three notes. However, all we're missing is the 5th, which would be G here. The 5th isn't key to the overall sound of a 7th chord.

Take, for example, this:
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That's an E7#9, the famous "Hendrix chord". It contains E (the root), G# (the 3rd), G (the flatted 3rd [this chord plays off the tension between both the natural 3rd and the flatted 3rd, in harmony with the 7th; just play it and see]), and D (the 7th). No 5th though.
The 5th is usually a note used to strengthen and augment a chord, but it isn't always required. In fact, if I had the choice between what notes to cut out of a full chord, I'd always choose the 5th -- every time.


Quote by mishax92
Cadd9 = C E G and D
Btw, I must say, I much prefer to notate this chord as C9 (No 7), as it avoids confusion in my mind. I just find it clearer.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jun 14, 2010,