#1
What really is the difference between a Compressor pedal and a Noise Suppressor Pedal?

Is the compressor just for sustain?

Sorry if this is a dumb question but i'm kind of just starting to use more than just an overdrive pedal
Last edited by handbanana at Jun 14, 2010,
#2
a Noise suppressor pedal puts a limit on the volume coming from your guitar to your amp, so if you have would have the noise suppresor on and your volume on your guitar extremely low and you play something extremely softly it wont come out of your amp... so most guys use suppressors to cut down on excess noise from the guitar. If you have a high gain amp, or just use high gain settings, its helpful eliminating feedback and unwanted noise.

A compressor on the other hand keeps each note you hit (hard or soft) on the same volume level. So if evens out your playing volume wise and also allows for longer sustain as it hightens the volume of the note as it fades out more and more creating one constant volume. =)
#3
ahh thankyou, that really explained everything. by the sounds of things i think i'm going to need both rather than one or the other. although i've heard from some people that noise suppressors aren't always good, and that they can negatively affect your tone at times. any answers for that?
#4
u could have both becuz the suppressor just keeps the buzz away and the sustain shorter but if u had both it shouldn't do anything to your sound except keep the sustain. i would recommend both, The BOSS brand.
#6
Quote by handbanana
ahh thankyou, that really explained everything. by the sounds of things i think i'm going to need both rather than one or the other. although i've heard from some people that noise suppressors aren't always good, and that they can negatively affect your tone at times. any answers for that?


Both effects can have problems. Noise gates can have tracking issues where they have trouble telling what's noise and what's guitar signal.

Compressors can be noisy pedals. They even out your guitar signal level, but they also bring up the noise floor. In general they shouldn't be used with medium or high gain amplifier channels. Compressors tend to sound best with clean or very slightly distorted amps and single coil pickups. Not something the stereotypical UG metalhead would really get along with.
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#7
well which would be the better route for me to cancel out noise? like when i stop playing my guitar is still very noisy. I am using a Gibson SG Standard through a Marshall AVT50 Combo, with an Ibanez TS9 and a Boss CE-5 in front of it. Although I don't always use the CE-5. Sometimes I use the onboard reverb as well.
#8
Quote by handbanana
well which would be the better route for me to cancel out noise? like when i stop playing my guitar is still very noisy.


That's what a noise gate is for. A compressor will actually make that problem worse.

But it might be worth dealing with the things in your rig that are creating the noise. IMO needing a noise gate is an indication that something's wrong elsewhere in your rig. Either you're using too much gain, or some piece of your rig has a problem or is just a bad piece of equipment.
GMW hot-rod telecaster
GMW soloist
PRS Custom 24
The Illegal Les Paul
CAE 3+SE
Soldano SM-100R
Splawn 4x12

“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
Substitute the stage for the wire, and he's got it.
#9
Well I have the gain at about 4, but i'm driving it with my TS9. My amp sort of makes a weird repeating noise when I turn it on, but once the tube warms up it silences. When I ring out as it starts to quiet down I get a loud feedback signal that gets louder and louder even when im at maximum distance away from my amp. I like a lot of distortion(not deathcore type, more like grungy/nirvana/alice in chains type) but as driven as I like it I really want to be able to clean it up a bit and make it brighter. Think of the riffs in "No Quarter" by Led Zeppelin. I love page's tone in there, i'm kind of going for that with a bit of a modern twist.

So would it be advantageous of me to get a Noise Suppressor?

Some bands I like to play include:
Black Sabbath
Led Zeppelin
Metallica
Black Flag
Nirvana
Cro-Mags

Pretty much any 90's hardcore band, and a lot of new hardcore(Blacklisted, Trapped Under Ice, Iron Age, Bitter End, etc.)

EDIT:I know this probably sounds completely retarded
Last edited by handbanana at Jun 14, 2010,
#10
Also forgot to mention that I think i'm buying a Peavey VTM 120 tommorow, so that might change things
#11
Quote by handbanana
Also forgot to mention that I think i'm buying a Peavey VTM 120 tommorow, so that might change things


Well, that's certainly going to be different, so I'd just wait and see where you're at.

Honestly the noises you're describing coming from the AVT make me thing there might be something wrong with it - at least a bad tube. But without hearing it in person it's hard to say. In any case if there is a problem with the AVT, a noise gate isn't the way to go about dealing with it.
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PRS Custom 24
The Illegal Les Paul
CAE 3+SE
Soldano SM-100R
Splawn 4x12

“Life is on the wire…the rest is just waiting” - Papa Wallenda
Substitute the stage for the wire, and he's got it.
#12
Quote by Even Bigger D
That's what a noise gate is for. A compressor will actually make that problem worse.

But it might be worth dealing with the things in your rig that are creating the noise. IMO needing a noise gate is an indication that something's wrong elsewhere in your rig. Either you're using too much gain, or some piece of your rig has a problem or is just a bad piece of equipment.


+1

I've never needed a noise gate and I've played thrash metal with single coils. You just have to isolate any noisy components and either get rid of them or find a way to quiet them down, usually some power filtering solves it.
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#13
its definitely not the tube, its made this noise since i've got it. I replaced the single 12ax7 with a brand new mesa tube about 6 months ago. It still makes the same noises, but the new tube definitely brought the sound back to life a bit more. Believe it or not I get a pretty decent tone out of it considering its mostly solid state. So if there is something wrong with my amp it's definitely not the tube, I atleast know that much
#14
First, running the Screamer into the high gain channel is going to give you some noise. I doubt there is much wrong with your amp or pedal. I just tested 6 OD pedals and they ALL make noise when plugged into a lead channel...some more than others, but they all did it (Ibanez, MXR, Hardwire, Fultone, BBE, and cheap generic green pedal)
Second. There are several kinds of noise suppressor.
There are Gates (most pedal types are gates) These kill the signal when the signal drops below a certain level. A GOOD one like the ISP will read the signal and alter when it cuts the signal....letting long singing note sustain, while cutting the signal very fast for staccato notes. These can be used in the loop OR the front of the amp. A gate can be used in the front of an amp just after the noisy OD pedal, but if you turn off the OD, the gate will be to strong for soft playing. They can go in the loop to shut off ALL amp noise...hum and hiss. Problem there is when switching channels you need to adjust the gate to match.
Next are actual noise suppressors. These usually are the rack versions of gates (Rocktron Hush, ISP Decimator Pro Rack). They keep the gate function, but also add an adjustable noise suppressor that cuts the hiss down even when the gate is open. These are usually best in the effects loop as your pre-amp causes hiss even with the guitar off.
Last are noise filters for the power going to your amp. These are usually in the form of a power strip (not the crap from wall mart) or a rack mounted power supply with multiple power outlets segregated for wall warts, and standard plugs (i.e. Furman )
These eliminate a lot of the noise you get from the AC power.

There are several Noise gate pedals that you put in the front of the amp AND effect loop at the same time. These do a very good job of cutting out the amp hiss and guitar/pedal noise. They read the signal from the guitar and shut off the loop based on the guitar...no messing with the gate when changing channels. One thing they don't do is reduce the noise WHILE you are playing.
ISP Makes a rack unit that does it all, the Pro Rack G. It gates the guitar AND effects loop, AND reduces noise while your playing (noticeable when holding a long sustained note more than the staccato stuff). This works great of MOST amps. I had an amp that the FX loop signal was too strong for the pro rack G and it would cross talk to the input side...LOTS of terrible noise there...but it works on most other amps. It DOES cost a bit more...around $425.

If you don't want to spend that kind of cash, you can get a good noise gate pedal, AND put a less expensive noise suppressor in the loop like the Rocktron Hush Super C (you can find the pedal AND Hush on E-bay for about $250) Put the pedal in the front of the amp but BEFORE your OD pedal, then put the hush in the effects loop. Set the gate on the hush JUST enough to kill the amp hiss (WITH your OD pedal ON with the lead channel) This kills all the unwanted hiss when you stop playing, AND most of the hiss while you are playing, and lets you switch the OD on and off, as well as change channels without having to touch either gate.

Set up correctly, a gate/suppressor should be completely transparent. You can have great sustain, AND kill the noise quickly when chopping notes. It should NOT effect your tone (The Boss pedal isn't very good there...stick with the ISP, or possibly the MXR smart gate) use only the LEAST amount of gate/suppressor you can get away with to keep your tone , and not cut off notes earlier than you wanted.
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Last edited by Vinson at Jun 15, 2010,
#15
haha at $425 I would be getting a JCM 900 or a 5150

but yeah I think i'm probably gonna consider looking around for an mxr tommorow. thanks man
#16
LOL! Honestly, that was a VERY disappointing day for me. Get my shinny new $425 gate, and it doesn't work with my amp
Maybe It'll try it again with my NEW amp, but for now, and ISP in the front, and a Hush in the back are working sweet
Ibanez RGR421EXFM, Michael Kelley Vex NV, Ovation Celebrity. Carvin V3
Peavey 412M w/Eminence Wizards & Swamp Thangs, Rocktron Hush Super C, Furman PL-8C,15 band EQ, Boosta grande, ISP Decimator, Dano EQ, Ibanez TBX 150,TC Elec Polytune
#17
Quote by Xezus


A compressor on the other hand keeps each note you hit (hard or soft) on the same volume level. So if evens out your playing volume wise and also allows for longer sustain as it hightens the volume of the note as it fades out more and more creating one constant volume. =)



That is a Limiter not a Compressor
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