#1
Well, I have been playing pretty much nothing but tabs and I am starting to get a little serious about actually learning how to play.

I was looking at the lesson here: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/the_major_scale.html

It describes a G Major scale. My questions are, why is it a G Major? Why are the notes what they are (EG. why half step why whole step etc.)

Basically why does this work at all like it does?

Also how are chords identified like a B7 chord? Did they just choose a letter and through a number next to it and say thats a B7 chord cuz we say so?
#2
Quote by xXAlphaXx
Well, I have been playing pretty much nothing but tabs and I am starting to get a little serious about actually learning how to play.

I was looking at the lesson here: http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/scales/the_major_scale.html

It describes a G Major scale. My questions are, why is it a G Major? Why are the notes what they are (EG. why half step why whole step etc.)

Basically why does this work at all like it does?

Also how are chords identified like a B7 chord? Did they just choose a letter and through a number next to it and say thats a B7 chord cuz we say so?

it's time someone learns what is called MUSIC THEORY.
#4
Well,

G Major consists of the notes it consists of because someone a long time ago figured those notes sounded good when arranged in a specific way. (Also, other major scales consists of the same sequence of notes, only with a different starting point. So, for example, A major would be like playing the same pattern as G major, only two frets (or one whole note) up.)

As for identifying chords. Let's say you have a normal A major chord. It would consist of the notes A, C# and E. This is where it gets a little complicated...

The distance between notes are measured in "intervals", which is a term you'll come across a lot. I'm not sure I could give a satisfactory explanation of them here, but there's plenty of lessons on them on this site. I totally recommend learning it; it's one of the most fundamental aspects in understanding music theory!

In the A major chord, the distance from A to C# is a major third. In a chord, the third decides if it's a major or minor chord. (Although some chords doesn't even have a third, for example your standard powerchord (or 5th chord, in theoryspeak))
The fifth (that is, the E) isn't accounted for in the chord name here, but it's an established norm that the basic (major and minor) chords has got a fifth in them.
(In case you're wondering intervals are measured from the root note, in this case A)

Also, for the B7 chord name, that means that the chord has a seventh in it (a minor seventh, in the case of B7. A major seventh would make the chord name Bmaj7.)
A B7 would consist of the notes B (root note), D# (major third), F# (fifth), and last, A (minor seventh)

Hope it helps. Good luck onwards, mate!
#7
Here's what your missing:

A G major scale is a G major scale because the root of the scale is G. You can think of the root as the anchor, the starting point, or more technically, the first degree of the scale.

A B7 chord is a B7 chord because the root of the chord is B.

It sounds like you should spend some time learning the fretboard. Try to get the notes on the low E and the A strings down cold. From there, you can figure out any note on the strings using single octave shapes and the double octave (e.g. the high E and the low E string have the same tone on each fret, except the tone on the high E string is two octaves higher than the low E string's tone)

Once you do that, go back and study the open chords you know. Find the root of each one; for instance, with a D major open chord, you would spot a D on the open D string as well as the 3rd fret of the B string. Knowing this, you can change the root by basically sliding the shape around the fretboard. These are barre chords. The next time you make an open chord shape, imagine you're fretting all the strings behind the end of the neck - all the open strings. This should help you visualize the chord shapes.

In summary; it's all about the roots. Learn the notes on the first two strings, learn one and two octave shapes, then learn how to build chords from the root. Scales work the same way - you build them from the root.
#8
Quote by olix95
it's time someone learns what is called MUSIC THEORY.


brief and a little harsh, but really, this is your answer.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
Quote by AeolianWolf
brief and a little harsh, but really, this is your answer.

just putting it out there
#10
many high schools do offer a music theory class though, if you are in high school