#1
lessons:

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons

edit(i have read hundreds of pages online that address roughly 50% of what those lessons cover)

if I finish all those lessons, what will that enable me to do on a guitar?(i only play ELECTRIC GUITAR, i am not interested in any other instrument at all)


what type of education would i need to be a good versatile musician that can jam at will with people?
Last edited by fupashredder at Jun 14, 2010,
#2
It will help you understand what people are talking about when they talk about things like I vi IV V7 progressions.
#3
yeah, it will help you actually understand what you are playing. Also, theory helps tremendously when writing.
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#4
Quote by fupashredder
lessons:

http://www.musictheory.net/lessons

edit(i have read hundreds of pages online that address roughly 50% of what those lessons cover)

if I finish all those lessons, what will that enable me to do on a guitar?(i only play ELECTRIC GUITAR, i am not interested in any other instrument at all)


what type of education would i need to be a good versatile musician that can jam at will with people?


Well, it'll teach you the basics. You won't be good overnight, probably not even in a year, and to be someone who can jam with other people all you need to know is your scales and key signatures. How you apply these concepts is more of your own thing...I can't help you with that so much, you'll have to let these concepts/lessons process before you can apply them to any music.
#5
Quote by pwrmax
It will help you understand what people are talking about when they talk about things like I vi IV V7 progressions.


I=major first

vi= minor sixth

IV=major fourth

V7=dominant fifth

not trying to be cocky. seriously correct me if i am wrong.


i am having trouble connecting this stuff with creating music on guitar.
#6
Quote by fupashredder
I=major first

vi= minor sixth

IV=major fourth

V7=dominant fifth

not trying to be cocky. seriously correct me if i am wrong.


i am having trouble connecting this stuff with creating music on guitar.


It's a perfect fourth, and perfect fifth...the fifth is dominant, but that doesn't describe it's quality of sound, which is what you're going for when you say major/minor w/e.

EDIT: Connecting this stuff to music...hmm, well IMO it's kind of a cookie cutter way to write music. I personally haven't used theory to write my own stuff because it becomes so thought out that it doesn't ever sound unique. You can use it to arrange melodies with one another, and see what sounds work together, and you can use it to write a quick song that works in most situations (V-I = perfect ending), but if you rely on music theory to write your songs your doing it wrong (my opinion again)...don't take my advice too seriously though because I'm a noob at writing my own music:/ just my experience
Last edited by justaramsfan at Jun 14, 2010,
#7
Quote by fupashredder
I=major first

vi= minor sixth

IV=major fourth

V7=dominant fifth

not trying to be cocky. seriously correct me if i am wrong.


i am having trouble connecting this stuff with creating music on guitar.



It's not a guide for creating music. It's a tool for studying it. Use that tool to analyze music. What you learn broadens your understanding of it, and enhances your ability to hear, giving you more to work with when you create your own music. It can also deepen your overall appreciation of music. Another positive.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by fupashredder
I=major first

vi= minor sixth

IV=major fourth

V7=dominant fifth

not trying to be cocky. seriously correct me if i am wrong.


i am having trouble connecting this stuff with creating music on guitar.

Do you know why they sound good together?
#9
Quote by pwrmax
Do you know why they sound good together?


why what sounds good together? but probably no, i do not know why
#10
Quote by fupashredder
why what sounds good together? but probably no, i do not know why


I'm not 100% clear what he was getting at...but my answer would be because they're diatonic (meaning they're notes of the same scale)
#11
Quote by justaramsfan
I'm not 100% clear what he was getting at...but my answer would be because they're diatonic (meaning they're notes of the same scale)

Well not just that, but why those chords flow together so well. I ii iii is diatonic but they don't flow as well.
#12
I don't think you're really understanding what this theory stuff is yet. Try to apply it as you read through them. You can't read a book on martial arts and expect to be Jackie Chan once you finish it (although that would be awesome).

The reason I say this is because you say you're only interested in what it can do for the electric guitar, when music theory applies to all instruments evenly.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#13
Er well not a whole lot at first. The question is a little odd but understandable. I'd compare to it to asking "what will I be capable of doing by the time I finish this guitar book?" The answer "play guitar" is misleading because that requires practice. Theory is used for composition and analysis, and both require practice. So get writing and start analyzing.
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#14
Quote by Eastwinn
Er well not a whole lot at first. The question is a little odd but understandable. I'd compare to it to asking "what will I be capable of doing by the time I finish this guitar book?" The answer "play guitar" is misleading because that requires practice. Theory is used for composition and analysis, and both require practice. So get writing and start analyzing.


i dont know what to write.....?

I have started to analyze songs.


bump: still wondering if going through all those lessons would be worth it for electric guitar. i believe i know 50% of what the lessons address. but i have gone through so many pages online about this stuff its gotten really mind numbing. better to just go to a guitar teacher????
#15
Quote by fupashredder
i dont know what to write.....?

I have started to analyze songs.


bump: still wondering if going through all those lessons would be worth it for electric guitar. i believe i know 50% of what the lessons address. but i have gone through so many pages online about this stuff its gotten really mind numbing. better to just go to a guitar teacher????


I don't know...try it, I learned it from a teacher, but after I reviewed those lessons I thought they were pretty full-proof--although they do go a little fast so you'll need to take a break to let it process...use the trainers on the site and you should be good to go
#16
Well, if your only interested in playing guitar, and not understanding why the music sounds goood, or writing, or anything else like that... Then I would suggest learning different scales, how to use them, and what chords to use them over. If you can learn this, you should be able to jam along with pretty much any band you want.

I would still suggest learning to do the other stuff you say your not interested in. Even though it may not help directly with your guitar playing, it will help you understand music better, which will most of the time help you to be a more natural guitar player, and will help learning guitar become easier.
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Violets are bitchin'
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#17
Quote by sites.nick
Well, if your only interested in playing guitar, and not understanding why the music sounds goood, or writing, or anything else like that... Then I would suggest learning different scales, how to use them, and what chords to use them over. If you can learn this, you should be able to jam along with pretty much any band you want..


i am only interested in playing electric guitar BUT i am also interested in writing and understanding why things sound good.

what scales do you mean?
#18
Pretty much any scales you want:

The most used scales are Major and Minor, Penatonic is also used a ton just because of how easy it is to jam with. Whenever I use the Penatonic, I always like to add in the blues notes as well. Just look up these scales somewhere on the internet, I know the patterns, but I wouldn't be able to tell you the intervals in each scale or anything unless I took the time to look at them, someone else might be able to though.

If you think you know enough theory, you could also try looking into modes, but that's getting a little complicated, and I don't know how much theory you know already.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"