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#1
I got a new tube amp and it's my first tube amp so I'm wondering what can blow the tubes, or transformer etc??

I noticed the amp gets very hot quickly even on the metal panel for the controls, even the on / off button.

What kind of stuff should I avoid? I'm not talking things like don't drain a drink onto the vent, keep ventilated, let tubes warm up etc, but things like how long can I play before I really sure let it cool down and what would burn the amp out volume wise, like having the amp volume cranked up aswell as an overdrive extra cranking it.

Or also the difference with the preamp and master volume. I know their purposes but what's their risks? Is it good having the preamp maxed out and the master only on 2, or should I be having the master cranked out with the preamp lowered. I don't really use it on clean channel, I like really cranked up classic rock trebly crunch.

Any warnings from anyone about what ways of overdriving it will kill it?? Too much preamp and master volume with TS9 etc.

Fender blues junior is the little puppy involved here btw.
Last edited by ThinkAboutIt at Jun 14, 2010,
#2
Thread title is slightly suggestive

Tubes will get hot, that's how they run. If you think they're too hot, make sure the amp is biased correctly. Really, nothing besides faulty parts is going to cause you to blow tubes. The only thing that you can really control is making sure it's plugged into a load (speaker) when you turn it on.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





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#3
The audiophile, obviously.
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- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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#5
Don't worry yourself about it. You shouldn't have any problems playing as long as you want, and the tubes are supposed to get hot. Just make sure to use standby correctly and always have a load connected.
#6
basically what has been said before, they get hot

but another thing is if you touch them with your hands, the oils will get on the tubes and in some cases this can cause them to crack.
Where's Waldo?
#7
Quote by chadreed32
basically what has been said before, they get hot

but another thing is if you touch them with your hands, the oils will get on the tubes and in some cases this can cause them to crack.

I've heard this a lot, but it seems kind of implausible. Would you by any change have a source for this?
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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#8
Quote by Kanthras
I've heard this a lot, but it seems kind of implausible. Would you by any change have a source for this?


Ill try to find one.... hold on
Where's Waldo?
#9
Quote by Kanthras
I've heard this a lot, but it seems kind of implausible. Would you by any change have a source for this?

+1, I've heard it many times and bought into it the first time I changed tubes... Since then, I've been touching them with my bare hands and have no problems
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#10
Quote by MatrixClaw
+1, I've heard it many times and bought into it the first time I changed tubes... Since then, I've been touching them with my bare hands and have no problems

Because tubes vaguely resemble halogen bulbs and John Q Public is retarded enough to believe they're the same thing.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#11
Make sure you use a speaker cable and not a regular instrument cable to attach the head to the cab. Make sure the ohmage is the same between the cab and head. Never turn the amp on if it isn't connected to the cab. (That's all if it's a stack - head & cab).

If/when you change tubes chances are you'll need to bias it (take it to an amp tech.) The tubes won't blow from cranking all the volume knobs (although they might wear down faster?) You could definitely blow a speaker doing that though I guess..
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#12
Quote by bubb_tubbs
Because tubes vaguely resemble halogen bulbs and John Q Public is retarded enough to believe they're the same thing.

lol, I remember now, it's BS alright.
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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#13
Quote by stykerwolf
Tubes blow up because they are horrible technology, they just do. they sound great though. and they power up radio stations...



Horrible technology? Wow. Somehow, for being horrible technology, they managed to take us from spark gap transmitters to the golden age of radio. Take it from an electronics technician - tubes go bad today due to poor workmanship, materials and quality control. Back in the 50s, 60s, 70s and early 80s, tubes were built incredibly well and were excellent technology for the period. In the later 80s and 90s, they almost disappeared due to the advent of the "technologically superior" transistor. Hrmph. The transistor may be good at doing many different tasks, but one thing it is not good at is providing warmth and superior dynamics to an audio signal. Due to this "fault", they've managed to make an incredible comeback. Needless to say, a lot of audiophiles and guitarists are quite happy that this "horrible technology" has been reborn. Me? I'll stick with my so-called "horrible technology" any day of the week. You won't find any SS guitar amps in my arsenal.

Oh, I've never actually seen a tube blow up. I've seen them fail, but they never quite blow up.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Jun 14, 2010,
#14
Quote by chadreed32
basically what has been said before, they get hot

but another thing is if you touch them with your hands, the oils will get on the tubes and in some cases this can cause them to crack.



Ummm, might you be thinking of a halogen light bulb? There's no halogen gas in vacuum tubes and they don't operate anywhere near the temperature that a halogen bulb operates at. Touching a halogen bulb with your fingers imparts body oil to it, creating a hot spot. Tubes operate at MUCH lower temps and do not suffer from hot spots. Whomever told you this fed you a line of bull. I've been using tubes for years and have never had one crack due to being handled with bare hands. Besides, I'm an electronics technician. Trust me.
#15
Quote by KG6_Steven
Ummm, might you be thinking of a halogen light bulb? There's no halogen gas in vacuum tubes and they don't operate anywhere near the temperature that a halogen bulb operates at. Touching a halogen bulb with your fingers imparts body oil to it, creating a hot spot. Tubes operate at MUCH lower temps and do not suffer from hot spots. Whomever told you this fed you a line of bull. I've been using tubes for years and have never had one crack due to being handled with bare hands. Besides, I'm an electronics technician. Trust me.

Yeah, saying a tube is going to shatter cause of hand oil is like saying a lightbulb will.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#16
Quote by KG6_Steven
Horrible technology? Wow. Somehow, for being horrible technology, they managed to take us from spark gap transmitters to the golden age of radio. Take it from an electronics technician - tubes go bad today due to poor workmanship, materials and quality control. Back in the 50s, 60s, 70s and early 80s, tubes were built incredibly well and were excellent technology for the period. In the later 80s and 90s, they almost disappeared due to the advent of the "technologically superior" transistor. Hrmph. The transistor may be good at doing many different tasks, but one thing it is not good at is providing warmth and superior dynamics to an audio signal. Due to this "fault", they've managed to make an incredible comeback. Needless to say, a lot of audiophiles and guitarists are quite happy that this "horrible technology" has been reborn. Me? I'll stick with my so-called "horrible technology" any day of the week. You won't find any SS guitar amps in my arsenal.

Oh, I've never actually seen a tube blow up. I've seen them fail, but they never quite blow up.

When you find a tube that is as cheap, consistent, efficient and as long lasting as an equivalent solid state device, then you can claim they're not horrible.
The fact that tubes have a way of clipping signals in a generally pleasing way hardly redeems them. Especially when you have excellent solid state amps which have plenty of dynamics and warmth. Well-designed solid state amps can sound good, imagine that!

edit: I hope I'm not starting a shitstorm here, as I'm going to bed right now. I guess I'll find out tomorrow. Don't kill eachother!
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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Last edited by Kanthras at Jun 14, 2010,
#17
Quote by Kanthras
When you find a tube that is as cheap, consistent, efficient and as long lasting as an equivalent solid state device, then you can claim they're not horrible.
The fact that tubes have a way of clipping signals in a generally pleasing way hardly redeems them. Especially when you have excellent solid state amps which have plenty of dynamics and warmth. Well-designed solid state amps can sound good, imagine that!

edit: I hope I'm not starting a shitstorm here, as I'm going to bed right now. I guess I'll find out tomorrow. Don't kill eachother!


No. We don't want a crap storm, just an intelligent debate with the facts. The fact is, tubes distort in a way transistors never, ever will. Tubes go into distortion very gently. Transistors go into distortion quite harshly and when they do, it's not the 2nd order harmonic that tubes generate, but the odd third harmonic. The second harmonic, generated by tubes is pleasing and desirable. The harsh third is unpleasing to the ear. That's why I've never been able to find a SS amp that I like.

Besides, let's take 2 amps - one is SS and the other is tube. Both amps go bad - at a gig. Yours is the SS. I carry spare tubes with me. I replace the bad output tube and go on to play the gig. Do you?

Sure, tubes cost more, but that's offset by the fact that I can easily do my own maintenance. With your amp, you have to bring it to me and I'm going to charge you around $75 an hour for labor, plus parts. To replace the output transistor(s) on your amp has more than justified the price of a set of tubes for my amp. To fix my amp, all I do is find the offending tube and replace it with a spare, which I keep on-hand at all times. How's that for ease, convenience and cost effectiveness?

Tube warmth vs. transistor warmth? Ain't gonna happen. No comparison. Tubes win the contest hands down every day of the week. Maybe I have "golden ears", somehow I doubt it, but I can hear the difference between tubes and transistors.

Bottom line... It's all about personal taste and preference. You may prefer the convenience of SS and be quite satisfied with their sound. That's why manufacturers make SS and tube amps - to satisfy a wide market. As they say, to each his own. Right?
#18
Transistors also aren't all that reliable. Lots of them are no good when you get a shipment in.
Everyone is entitled to an opinion.

Feel free to express yours so I can make an informed judgement about how stupid you are.
#19
Quote by KG6_Steven
No. We don't want a crap storm, just an intelligent debate with the facts. The fact is, tubes distort in a way transistors never, ever will. Tubes go into distortion very gently. Transistors go into distortion quite harshly and when they do, it's not the 2nd order harmonic that tubes generate, but the odd third harmonic. The second harmonic, generated by tubes is pleasing and desirable. The harsh third is unpleasing to the ear. That's why I've never been able to find a SS amp that I like.

Besides, let's take 2 amps - one is SS and the other is tube. Both amps go bad - at a gig. Yours is the SS. I carry spare tubes with me. I replace the bad output tube and go on to play the gig. Do you?

Sure, tubes cost more, but that's offset by the fact that I can easily do my own maintenance. With your amp, you have to bring it to me and I'm going to charge you around $75 an hour for labor, plus parts. To replace the output transistor(s) on your amp has more than justified the price of a set of tubes for my amp. To fix my amp, all I do is find the offending tube and replace it with a spare, which I keep on-hand at all times. How's that for ease, convenience and cost effectiveness?

Tube warmth vs. transistor warmth? Ain't gonna happen. No comparison. Tubes win the contest hands down every day of the week. Maybe I have "golden ears", somehow I doubt it, but I can hear the difference between tubes and transistors.

Bottom line... It's all about personal taste and preference. You may prefer the convenience of SS and be quite satisfied with their sound. That's why manufacturers make SS and tube amps - to satisfy a wide market. As they say, to each his own. Right?
Yes, SS amps do not sound like tube amps. But to say they cannot sound warm is, I think, false. I've heard SS amps be warm, but I suppose there could be a difference of standards/definitions here ("warm" is not exactly an SI unit).

As for reliability, a properly designed SS circuit will last a very very long time. In the off-chance event that it does crap out in a gig, well, who gigs without a backup?
Honestly, I think a lot of problems that SS amps have right now could be designed out. Reliability could be improved by designing the amps to run colder (by better cooling), since SS loves cold (it could last multiple lifetimes if you ran it really cold). And ICs could be mounted in sockets so they could be switched out, much like tubes, in case they do fail.
Quote by bubb_tubbs
Transistors also aren't all that reliable. Lots of them are no good when you get a shipment in.

Shitty QC != unreliable. A good piece of SS tech kept at low temperatures will last a very long time.
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- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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Last edited by Kanthras at Jun 15, 2010,
#20
Quote by KG6_Steven
Horrible technology? Wow. Somehow, for being horrible technology, they managed to take us from spark gap transmitters to the golden age of radio. Take it from an electronics technician - tubes go bad today due to poor workmanship, materials and quality control. Back in the 50s, 60s, 70s and early 80s, tubes were built incredibly well and were excellent technology for the period. In the later 80s and 90s, they almost disappeared due to the advent of the "technologically superior" transistor. Hrmph. The transistor may be good at doing many different tasks, but one thing it is not good at is providing warmth and superior dynamics to an audio signal. Due to this "fault", they've managed to make an incredible comeback. Needless to say, a lot of audiophiles and guitarists are quite happy that this "horrible technology" has been reborn. Me? I'll stick with my so-called "horrible technology" any day of the week. You won't find any SS guitar amps in my arsenal.

Oh, I've never actually seen a tube blow up. I've seen them fail, but they never quite blow up.


I'm calling them horrible technology today as they are only used for a number of things, they are inefficient, they take up space and need to be fed with a lot of current. I'm calling them horrible technology because they are in todays terms, not when they were first made.

The greatest invention of electronics history is putting a grid inside a vacuum tube and being able to control the electron flow.
#21
I realised the other day that it's not just the sound and dynamics of valve amps that appeal to me. It's the sheer primitive simplicity of the thing. It's such an agricultural thing when you think about it, and let's just do that.
You have two iron plates that you put some killer voltage on and you heat one of them until it glows. You then take a wire that's wrapped around a magnet and connect it to a piece of chook wire suspended between your two iron plates. Connect a speaker across your two plates via another couple of coils of wire and whallah - sweet tones.
No mystical crystal lattices with alchemist infusions of rare earth elements doing shit that defies scientific explanation. Just a few pieces of wire and lumps of metal. Real men use valve amps.


PS: the whole touching the valves thing is a myth. You could paint them with sweat and it would do jack squat.
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#22
Quote by Cathbard
I realised the other day that it's not just the sound and dynamics of valve amps that appeal to me. It's the sheer primitive simplicity of the thing. It's such an agricultural thing when you think about it, and let's just do that.
You have two iron plates that you put some killer voltage on and you heat one of them until it glows. You then take a wire that's wrapped around a magnet and connect it to a piece of chook wire suspended between your two iron plates. Connect a speaker across your two plates via another couple of coils of wire and whallah - sweet tones.

Yes, and it would oxidize and wear out in 5 minutes.
You conveniently forgot the part where you insert it into a glass tube and painstakingly make sure all the air gets out, then ignite some nasty chemicals to kill any remaining air. Of course, that's still a lot simpler than making ICs, which kinda requires multi billion dollar fabs, so I get what you're saying.
No mystical crystal lattices with alchemist infusions of rare earth elements doing shit that defies scientific explanation. Just a few pieces of wire and lumps of metal. Real men use valve amps.

Well, that's certainly true.
PS: the whole touching the valves thing is a myth. You could paint them with sweat and it would do jack squat.

I assume you've done testing?
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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#23
Lots of offtopic here...

Basically, your amp should be able to handle all the knobs turned to the max. However, a tube's lifespan depends on how hard it's driven. This means that playing at higher volumes will kill your tubes sooner. Don't worry about it too much though, they will still last a long time.

It's already been said, but this is important: never turn the amp on without speakers connected, and also never use a regular instrument cable to connect them.

I also suggest not to play bass through a guitar amp, because it will damage the speakers. It won't hurt the amp itself, though.
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#24
Quote by Kanthras
I assume you've done testing?

I have read some testing that mythbusted it somewhere but how scientific the test was I don't know.
Anecdotally from my own experience; I've seen lots and lots of dead tubes and I've never seen a cracked valve glass (except when the valve has been dropped) and I've seen some grubby looking valves with fingerprints all over them. I've seen people use a rag to remove a valve because it was hot but who does it otherwise? If it was a common cause of failure or even a likely cause surely we'd be seeing all these cracked valve everywhere. They simply aren't that fragile. Have you ever smashed something like an EL34 apart? It's pretty tough glass. It's not just heat resistant, it's tough heat resistant glass.
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Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


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#25
Quote by Cathbard
I have read some testing that mythbusted it somewhere but how scientific the test was I don't know.
Anecdotally from my own experience; I've seen lots and lots of dead tubes and I've never seen a cracked valve glass (except when the valve has been dropped) and I've seen some grubby looking valves with fingerprints all over them. I've seen people use a rag to remove a valve because it was hot but who does it otherwise? If it was a common cause of failure or even a likely cause surely we'd be seeing all these cracked valve everywhere. They simply aren't that fragile. Have you ever smashed something like an EL34 apart? It's pretty tough glass. It's not just heat resistant, it's tough heat resistant glass.

They're definitely tough bastards. The first time I tried to remove a tube, it was pretty hardcore stuck in the socket and I was scared pulling it with a lot of force would break it. Didn't happen though.
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#26
Considering valves have been replaced by transistors in pretty much everything other than music/audio purposes because transistors are more efficient, reliable, easier to maintain and provide higher, crisper and clearer sound quality id say its a pretty horrible old dead technology. Its the degrade in sound quality that makes it so desirable to guitarists/whoever because that's where the prettyness comes from.

I mean, if my HD TV was valve powered itd be pretty wanky.

I do have a question though, considering the quality of NOS valves vs the regular stuff today, are they designed to last a shorter time to force you to replace them more often due to the smaller market for valves these days?
I was thinking about it, i don't see why people cant just make valves to the same standards as NOS stuff these days, or even better considering our technology has advanced so much since.. But then it'd probably cost you your house for a 12ax7.
#27
I guess it's just that in ye olde days everybody and their dog knew about valves, they were made all over the world. With that many people the cream at the top is pretty big. These days there isn't as big a skill-base to choose from.
When everybody's doing it you have to be bloody good to stand out.
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Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
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#28
Quote by Cathbard
I have read some testing that mythbusted it somewhere but how scientific the test was I don't know.
Anecdotally from my own experience; I've seen lots and lots of dead tubes and I've never seen a cracked valve glass (except when the valve has been dropped) and I've seen some grubby looking valves with fingerprints all over them. I've seen people use a rag to remove a valve because it was hot but who does it otherwise? If it was a common cause of failure or even a likely cause surely we'd be seeing all these cracked valve everywhere. They simply aren't that fragile. Have you ever smashed something like an EL34 apart? It's pretty tough glass. It's not just heat resistant, it's tough heat resistant glass.


I smashed one of my Valvo DAF41 (from somewhere around 1940-50) type tubes, that thing was bullet proof, i had to literally put a newspaper over the tube and whack it with a sledgehammer to blow it open.

other then that the top pointy part is usually very weak, i broke one off my el84 because i was too lazy to move this stupid metal thingy holding the tube
#29
new tubes just suck. old valves just to last forever. i mean they were used in spaceships and tanks and heart monitors and stuff. comparatively the new stuff is terrible. It still sounds alright though. It's just lacking almost everything else that makes a good tube a good tube. I mean that's all right because we only need them to sound good. As long as the tube amp market is strong they'll continue to get better.

Tubes are supposed to get hot. Really hot. Like don't touch them hot (verified through experiment). They will burn the shit out of your hands. However, only the heater really should glow. If you look at your tubes and they are hot and the bottom is glowing and the middle is glowing and the top is glowing...that tube is about to explode.

I've never had a problem with my tubes getting dirty and exploding. I manhandle them all the time. I keep them in a shoebox.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#30
TS the amp was meant to be cranked up, it has a nice sweet spot around 7 or 8. live there.

also the older and deader the technology the better. i'm a big fan of the wheel.
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
Last edited by gregs1020 at Jun 15, 2010,
#32
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
If it is too hot maybe you should blow on it. BJ's get hot.

Well, the saliva should aid the tubes in cooling down.
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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#33
Quote by beckyjc
Considering valves have been replaced by transistors in pretty much everything other than music/audio purposes because transistors are more efficient, reliable, easier to maintain and provide higher, crisper and clearer sound quality id say its a pretty horrible old dead technology. Its the degrade in sound quality that makes it so desirable to guitarists/whoever because that's where the prettyness comes from.

I mean, if my HD TV was valve powered itd be pretty wanky.

I do have a question though, considering the quality of NOS valves vs the regular stuff today, are they designed to last a shorter time to force you to replace them more often due to the smaller market for valves these days?
I was thinking about it, i don't see why people cant just make valves to the same standards as NOS stuff these days, or even better considering our technology has advanced so much since.. But then it'd probably cost you your house for a 12ax7.



Hold on a second...

More efficient: Yes
Reliable: Yes
Easier to maintain: Wrong
Provide higher, crisper, clearer sound quality: Wrong, Yes, Not always desirable

First off, the stuff being made today is not NOS. NOS refers to a brand new tube that has been in someone's stock for several years and never sold. This could be a tube from the 1950s to roughly the early 1980s.

NOS tubes are not designed to wear out faster. If anything, the quality of a NOS tube from 1950 is better than the new tube produced in a modern factory yesterday. The old NOS tube has better quality components, better construction and was better inspected than the stuff we see today. A lot of the problem has to do with obtaining the same materials used 40 and 50 years ago. Back then, tubes were the only game in town, so tube manufacturers knew how to build them, how to build them right and their materials were high quality. This resulted in some very high quality tubes. That's why you can find 12AX7A tubes from that era selling for $250. Their construction gave them superior sound quality and they'll last for years. After tubes went away and transistors became the norm, sources for tube raw stock dried up. The plants went out of business and machinery was sold or scrapped. In effect, they're having to start all over. Sure, some of these tube builders today boast about having GEs machine for building this or that tube, but it's the raw materials that make up a major portion of the tube's sound. The other part that determines tube sound is proper construction. If a machine isn't adjusted right and the critical gaps and spaces aren't right, sound suffers. Some of the new tubes come quite close to approximating the sound of some of the old tubes, but that's about it. As time goes on, I think tube quality will improve, but it's going to take some time. I've bought 2 new tube amps in the past couple of years - and I'm not talking cheap crap. I'm talking about Mesa and Rivera. Both amps had a tube that failed within a couple of months of taking them out of the box. Had either of those amps been SS, I would've been forced to either fix them myself, or haul them back to the dealer for warranty repair. With my tube amps, I quickly troubleshot and replaced the bad tubes and was back up in no time.
#34
Quote by KG6_Steven
Hold on a second...

More efficient: Yes
Reliable: Yes
Agreed.
Easier to maintain: Wrong
Disagreed. Ease of maintenance lies in the design of the amplifier, not whether it's SS or tube.
Provide higher, crisper, clearer sound quality: Wrong, Yes, Not always desirable
Debatable, but I'm not gonna do it.
*Lots of stuff about NOS tubes*
I think you might've misunderstood Becky there.
I've bought 2 new tube amps in the past couple of years - and I'm not talking cheap crap. I'm talking about Mesa and Rivera.
Both amps had a tube that failed within a couple of months of taking them out of the box. Had either of those amps been SS, I would've been forced to either fix them myself, or haul them back to the dealer for warranty repair. With my tube amps, I quickly troubleshot and replaced the bad tubes and was back up in no time.

A high-quality SS amp would not fail so quickly.
And like I've said before, it's a fault in the design that causes SS amps to be hard to service in general. It is not the fault of the technology itself.
Gear:
- Bugera 333
- VJ & VJ cab
- Jackson JS30
- TS9

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#35
Quote by 311ZOSOVHJH
If it is too hot maybe you should blow on it. BJ's get hot.


you definitely don't want to have it blow up in your eye.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#37
Quote by AcousticMirror
you definitely don't want to have it blow up in your eye.

verified through experiment?
I wondered why the frisbee was getting bigger, then it hit me.
#38
Quote by Kanthras
Disagreed. Ease of maintenance lies in the design of the amplifier, not whether it's SS or tube.
And like I've said before, it's a fault in the design that causes SS amps to be hard to service in general. It is not the fault of the technology itself.

In some ways yes but in other ways no. It's the nature of valve amps to have easier to work on circuits (with some notable exceptions). For starters I've only ever seen one SS amp that had it's finals in sockets whereas I've never seen a soldered in valve in an amp. The technology itself is what tends to dictate the design. For the average non-tech a valve amp is far more likely to be fixable by the user even if he does have to do it more often. On the minus side of course, is that he is also more likely to kill himself trying. Like I said - real men use valves. They come from a time when men were men, women were women and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
Last edited by Cathbard at Jun 15, 2010,
#39
While everyone is discussing tubes (and I'm glad you are, its interesting) I have a question:

Is it true that there are no tubes manufactured in America today? (I mean the kind we would use in amplifiers.)
#40
Nope, they aren't made over here any more either. It's just Russia, China, Slovakia and Czech. There are other manufacturers (even in the US) but they make other wierd stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vacuum_tube#Modern_manufacturers
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
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