#1
Quick question:

What's the general eq'ing technique for making the notes of a chord clear and distinct?
I'm talking about high gain chords that involve dissonant notes that I'd like to all be ringing clearly.

Essentially I suppose I just want to make the sound less muddy while keeping it high gain.

Any tips?
#2
well mids are important, and a decent balance of highs, lows, best thing to do is just set all the eq knobs to 12 oclock and tweak from there, but i always like a little extra mids. sense ya said high gain ya might not want to hear this, but i find backing off the gain helps.
#3
^Yep, back off the gain a little, strongish mids, not a heap of bass. A little more presence usually helps too, if your amp has a presence knob. Proper intonation helps a lot too, it will sound much clearer.
What amp/guitar/pickups are you using?
#4
I'm using a schecter hellraiser c-1 fr with emg 81/89 in the bridge and neck respectively. This goes through my visual sound v2 jekyll and hyde into my blues junior.

I suppose my tone isn't really 'high gain.' At least not comparable to 6505/mesa high gain.

Nonetheless, I'm trying to get the best thick and heavy tone I can without making it muddy.
#6
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
i used to own the JHv2 and i found that the gain at around 12-2 oclock(hyde side) was heavy enough but still able to ring in nice chords, but i use Passive Pups. i did notice that if i went over 2 it got really muddy.


What amp were you using it through? Could you describe the distortion you were able to get with those settings?
#7
How loud are you playing? With low watters like the BJ if you crank it up then throw on distortion it will lose clarity. Backing off the gain on the pedal, the volume of the amp, or the volume on your guitar or sometimes all three should clean it up.
Quote by Cathbard
Quote by Raijouta
Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#8
I'm not sure why people are saying mids, since they're usually what bring the mud. The trick is to cut the mids to the point where you get clarity, but not so much that you don't cut through. A little extra presence and hi's can help to.

Best thing you can do is grab a 10 band EQ and experiment with everything between 250Hz and 2Khz usually cutting just one or two of the frequencies in that range will greatly decrease the mud, while still leaving you with the mids you need to get heard in the mix.
#9
Quote by youngapprentice
What amp were you using it through? Could you describe the distortion you were able to get with those settings?


i was running it into a twin reverb at one time, volume on stage was usually around 3 on the dial, then a Blues Deluxe RI volume was usually around 2. the crunchy tone i was getting can only be described as a cross between Alice in Chains and Metallica's black album. but this was with the gain on the pedal backed off quite a bit as i usually dont use a major amount of gain because i love doing alot of chord work mixed with leads, but i was also using passive Pups, which i'd imagine would sound very different compared to EMGs.

and some people say more mids because honestly alot of people neglect them alot(as in cutting them or scooping), thats at least what i've noticed alot with people's EQ settings.
Last edited by WaltTheWerewolf at Jun 14, 2010,
#10
Quote by icronic
Best thing you can do is grab a 10 band EQ and experiment with everything between 250Hz and 2Khz usually cutting just one or two of the frequencies in that range will greatly decrease the mud, while still leaving you with the mids you need to get heard in the mix.

I'd extend that range to 4 kHz or even 5 kHz and just experiment. Back when I used a 32 band EQ I found that often it would be one small notch that would muddy it up. Sometimes it would be something up around 4k that would be the prime culprit. It depends on the guitar, the rig AND the room you're playing in. 32 band is probably overkill though, 10 band is usually sufficient.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band