#1
I feel like when I solo that I limit myself. If I was going to solo over a C major chords progression, I would use C Ionian, D Dorian, E Phrygian, and so on, but I only 1 position of each scale. But I feel very limited bc the solo always ends up sounding boring. I don't know how to phrase or throw techniques I know into the solo well. What do I do?
Slappa tha bass
#3
What you could do is either:

1) learn more positions to vary your playing.
2) forbid yourself to play the usual stuff you play and thusly forcing yourself to play completely new licks.
3) Forget all about modes and scales, use your ears to see what sounds good and what, well...doesn't.
Yeah
#4
I suppose you should play each scale at varying positions until you know it so well you can do it with your eyes closed. and then play them running into each other. and by that stage, you ought to be able to mix them up pretty well.

Once you know the scales well and can jump between them, you can start to throw in other licks and techniques that you have picked up over the years.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#5
Quote by hootie37
I feel like when I solo that I limit myself. If I was going to solo over a C major chords progression, I would use C Ionian, D Dorian, E Phrygian, and so on, but I only 1 position of each scale. But I feel very limited bc the solo always ends up sounding boring. I don't know how to phrase or throw techniques I know into the solo well. What do I do?


Firstly, you're not using "D dorian" or "E phrygian", it's all just C major if you're playing over something in C major.

Secondly, stop playing and start listening, at the moment you're letting your fingers run over things you know and what you need to do is stop, listen to the backing and think about what you want to play next. Even if you're only playing one note per chord or bar or whatever, if that's a note you've considered and you're sure it's the sound you want it's infinitely better than even the fastest shred.

If you can't do that (and it does take some time so don't worry about it) then take what you want to play over and sing your solo over it then try and figure out what you were singing on the guitar. That takes out the physical limitations of what you can do on the guitar and puts you back in a pure creative space that you don't have to think about.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Firstly, you're not using "D dorian" or "E phrygian", it's all just C major if you're playing over something in C major.

Secondly, stop playing and start listening, at the moment you're letting your fingers run over things you know and what you need to do is stop, listen to the backing and think about what you want to play next. Even if you're only playing one note per chord or bar or whatever, if that's a note you've considered and you're sure it's the sound you want it's infinitely better than even the fastest shred.

If you can't do that (and it does take some time so don't worry about it) then take what you want to play over and sing your solo over it then try and figure out what you were singing on the guitar. That takes out the physical limitations of what you can do on the guitar and puts you back in a pure creative space that you don't have to think about.


Thank you. This is exactly the kind of thing I needed.
Slappa tha bass
#7
If your playing over a progression in C major, it's not modal. So your not playing modes at all.

The positions and notes may be the same, but you are playing the C major scale. A lot of people (including myself until recently) are confused about this.

My suggestion:

- learn notes on fret board
- learn notes in the scale you are using (in this case C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C)

As you are soloing, pay attention to the underlying chord tones (notes within each chord). These are the notes that sound the best when resolved to.

Over a C major chord, emphasize the C, E and G notes. Over an F major chord, emphasize the F, A and C notes etc.
"Swords, nature's hell sticks."- Trip Fisk
#8
Definitely try to fill in the blanks between the 6th, 5th and octave positions for each scale you're using, and learn some new licks either original ones people have submitted online, or find a solo that fits over the music you're playing to, and find some licks within the solo you can use.
#9
Quote by mtforever
If your playing over a progression in C major, it's not modal. So your not playing modes at all.

The positions and notes may be the same, but you are playing the C major scale. A lot of people (including myself until recently) are confused about this.

My suggestion:

- learn notes on fret board
- learn notes in the scale you are using (in this case C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C)

As you are soloing, pay attention to the underlying chord tones (notes within each chord). These are the notes that sound the best when resolved to.

Over a C major chord, emphasize the C, E and G notes. Over an F major chord, emphasize the F, A and C notes etc.


Why bother with all that when you can just sing over it and then transcribe what you play? Take out the thinking and physical elements and all you are left with is musical expression which is, after all, exactly what we're looking for. Yes it's good to know what you're doing in terms of theory but this is intellectualising what is, after all, not an intellectual persuit.

Also if you're singing and transcribing and singing and transcribing again and again you will eventually develop the skill well enough that you won't need to transcribe any more; you'll just play what you're thinking.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Jun 14, 2010,
#10
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Why bother with all that when you can just sing over it and then transcribe what you play? Take out the thinking and physical elements and all you are left with is musical expression which is, after all, exactly what we're looking for. Yes it's good to know what you're doing in terms of theory but this is intellectualising what is, after all, not an intellectual persuit.

Also if you're singing and transcribing and singing and transcribing again and again you will eventually develop the skill well enough that you won't need to transcribe any more; you'll just play what you're thinking.


Good, ear skills are important as well. You need good ear skills to really know how to improvise, but that doesn't take away the fact that you should know what notes you are playing.

Yes, it has alot to do with listening. It also has alot to do with feel and emotion. But a good understanding of theory makes it a lot easier to express that emotion.

And who is to say that music isn't an intellectual pursuit?

but anyways, different strokes for different folks
"Swords, nature's hell sticks."- Trip Fisk
#11
Quote by mtforever
Good, ear skills are important as well. You need good ear skills to really know how to improvise, but that doesn't take away the fact that you should know what notes you are playing.

Yes, it has alot to do with listening. It also has alot to do with feel and emotion. But a good understanding of theory makes it a lot easier to express that emotion.

And who is to say that music isn't an intellectual pursuit?

but anyways, different strokes for different folks


Well this is all tied into the way I like to think about theory, as far as I'm concerned it's a tool for communicating what you've played after the fact. I would also contend that theory may tell you what will sound "right" but your voice will always tell you exactly what you WANT to play, whether it fits into theory or not. It is also the primary expressive tool, you might not know an ounce of theory but if you sing what you want to play it will always be exactly what you want to express.

Again, I support the idea of music as an expressive art rather than an intellectual pursuit. I do enjoy the intellectualisation when it comes to finding new sounds, writing experimental music and any number of other things but in my mind at least the expression is first.

You're right though, different strokes and all that, I have no right to tell anyone what music is and is not or what the best way to write your solos is, whatever works for you and helps you get the music in your head out into the world
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.