#1
When I'm playing songs that require you to mute your strings, does it matter where you mute your strings? I notice as you go down the board the mutes start sounding a little harmonic-y, so!

I was wondering what does everyone else do when it comes to muting strings?
#2
Depends on what you're playing. I play a lot of metal, and with all the distortion you need a very effective way of muting cleanly otherwise you just make noise, so I use both hands (left hand 3-4 fingers laid straight across the strings, right hand side of the palm pressed across the strings about 2 inches from the bridge). When I play clean I'd often mute with only my right hand, or even with only one finger from the left. Like I said, it depends on what you're playing...
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#3
yeah, like above said. Theres palm mutes and string mutes (dont know real term for this). Palm muting, like explained above, is muting the strings with your palm of your right hand or strumming hand. In this way the fretted strings make a muted sound but is of the fretted notes. like if you palm mute a C chord it will sound like a dull C. If you mute the strings its basically always going to be an dull "open" sound.

Your comment about harmonics..... these are achieved by holding your finger over the string just barely touching it, which produces a "harmonic" tone. This works at 12th fret, 7th fret on acoustic and 3rd fret on electric/ classical. Some people say 5th fret as well, but this might just be a phenomenon on some guitars. I dont think its a standard thing, but i could be wrong as i am self taught in theory and practice. So anyway, if your string muting you could be getting harmonics without intending to do so. If your getting harmonics, just push a little harder, but without actually fretting the string to the board.
#4
It's all about feeling.
Generally, the sweet spot is the meat below your thumb, on the hand.
Usually it's just a trial/error thing to just feel around for your comfort area.

I like to cut/mute notes with my fret hand though.
I'll cut notes or chords short by lifting off when necessary, etc.

The key is to experiment as much as possible.
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#5
Quote by mullet_318
yeah, like above said. Theres palm mutes and string mutes (dont know real term for this). Palm muting, like explained above, is muting the strings with your palm of your right hand or strumming hand. In this way the fretted strings make a muted sound but is of the fretted notes. like if you palm mute a C chord it will sound like a dull C. If you mute the strings its basically always going to be an dull "open" sound.

Your comment about harmonics..... these are achieved by holding your finger over the string just barely touching it, which produces a "harmonic" tone. This works at 12th fret, 7th fret on acoustic and 3rd fret on electric/ classical. Some people say 5th fret as well, but this might just be a phenomenon on some guitars. I dont think its a standard thing, but i could be wrong as i am self taught in theory and practice. So anyway, if your string muting you could be getting harmonics without intending to do so. If your getting harmonics, just push a little harder, but without actually fretting the string to the board.


little bit off topic, but harmonics on the fifth is a natural harmonic, which means it can be played at ANY string instrument (that place in relation to the bridge) , but as every guitar is different, on some guitars they may not be very loud.


now, for the topic: I think that you are muting your strings with your left hand (fretting hand). you're doing this by not pressing the strings against the fretboard, right? well, on some places on the string, you have natural harmonics, that is on 5th, 7th, 12th, and some other places.
Now, in tabs, there's not always written palm muting, but 90% of the times, that is what is meant. -> you should then palm mute (i.e. resting the palm of your right hand/pick hand on the strings when strumming).
If you're supposed to mute with your fretting hand, it's mostly mentioned explicitly.
(when muting with your fretting hand, don't lift your finger too much, to prevent harmonics from sounding when you don't want it)

At least, that's what I think you're doing
and if that's not the reason, other people will find it helpful I guess
Last edited by Karel Juwet at Jun 15, 2010,