#1
ive got a really prominent english accent (southern, not east ender) and it really shines through with a mike, and i was wondering if anyone knows how to stop this happening?
#2
why do you want to stop it?
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#4
diction training... there are a few torrents floating around that can help you practice... try one by Chris Beattie I think his name is
#5
I say sing along to american bands or any other band that sings without an english accent and try to sound like them... You will probably not lose all of it since I take it you're born and raised in england. but you may learn to pronounce some words differently. Try it out!
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#6
Quote by rsatrinations
and it really shines through with a mike

what about a Dave?
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#7
Quote by Bair
what about a Dave?





I need to sig this.

OT: I have a fairly strong brummy accent, but as suggested above, singing along with other bands has helped me develop a less brummy singing voice. That said, I also take advantage of it sometimes, It adds character to what you are singing, makes it different if you have your own nuances in the pronunciations of words and whatnot.
#8
Quote by backtothe70s
I say sing along to american bands or any other band that sings without an english accent and try to sound like them... You will probably not lose all of it since I take it you're born and raised in england. but you may learn to pronounce some words differently. Try it out!


neither, born in south africa, five years in both singapore and australia, and poland for two years, only four months in britain but my parents are brits
#9
Quote by rsatrinations
ive got a really prominent english accent (southern, not east ender) and it really shines through with a mike, and i was wondering if anyone knows how to stop this happening?

Be a different person?

Look, this is YOUR voice, it's how YOU sound - deal with it.

If you start trying to force some kind of fake accent when you sing you'll just end up sounding like a spaz. Just make sure you're actually singing, not doing that weird half-singing, half-talking thing a lot of people seem to do - if you're singing properly that should naturally take you away from some of the inflections that you use when speaking.
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Last edited by steven seagull at Jun 15, 2010,
#10
Most people sing with a "universal accent"- its a technique heavily used in acting (thats why most actors dont appear to have any particular accent on-screen). I don't know how to force that though, personally it just happens naturally when I sing and everyone I know does the same :S
#11
A lot of it is to do with breathing, and therefore singing, properly. You breathe a certain way when you talk, and that plays a part in how your voice sounds - if you don't change your breathing when you try to sing then you'll just be talking in tune and your accent's still going to be there.

When you sing you use longer breaths and push more air out, to a certain degree that can mask an accent.
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#12
^uh, breath support has nothing to do with having an accent buddy.

but generally you'd want to figure out what vowels and consonants are giving you the most trouble and work on those. record yourself singing and you should hear which ones are making you sound the most British, probably things like the open Ah vowel and those hard D's but it depends where you're from (don't know the southern accents that well)

you can lose most if not all of your accent when you sing because you're using a different part of your brain and it's a separate skill, but it will take time.
#13
Quote by Cheeseman07

but generally you'd want to figure out what vowels and consonants are giving you the most trouble and work on those. record yourself singing and you should hear which ones are making you sound the most British, probably things like the open Ah vowel and those hard D's but it depends where you're from (don't know the southern accents that well)


What makes someone sound "British"?

I just have to point out that its really subjective (depends on your own accent etc,). I have a southern english accent when I talk, but for singing it has kinda disappeared (mostly anyway from what I can hear).

Concentrate on articulating everything as clearly as possible- and if there are any vowels that you don't like the sound of too much then work on adjusting those (which is, I think, what Cheeseman is saying too ).

I wouldn't say that hard D's are something particular to an english accent- they're more of a german accent thing. You might be thinking that because American accents tend to have softer D's...
#14
Wait, I'm confused. If singing with proper technique causes your accent to become less prominent, how does one explain people like Tarja Turunen? Her accent is so thick that you can't even understand her half the time, especially on the early Nightwish albums. Is it because she's not speaking her native language?
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#15
Quote by SnowKitty
Wait, I'm confused. If singing with proper technique causes your accent to become less prominent


It's not "proper technique" in general, but a class of classical style singing. If you erase the accent, you will be singing it closest to how the writer envisaged it. However, the obvious problem is that it will always be with an accent, as it is in a language. But if one were to point to the "proper" way of pronouncing words in speech and song, then it would have to be English, like high-class 1800s aristocrat English.

Now this may sound great and all, but when you take such a method and apply it to contemporary rock music, it can sound a bit odd. Can you imagine "Smells Like Teen Spirit" with perfect pronunciation? It would definitely not have the same vibe to it. It can have the effect of making it less "personal".

But there's obvious advantages as well, the primary being that if you have a particularly heavy accent, practicing proper pronunciation will help your words become clearer and the audience can hear them better. This is important as a lot of people listen to the lyrics of the songs. For example I had a habit of saying "ee" sounds with an "i" sound instead. So instead of singing "seems" I'd sing "sims". Not a big difference, but if the word is higher and louder than the rest, it can be confusing for the crowd, and come off as a bit strange.

I'm not sure what I'm trying to say. It's not singing WITHOUT an accent, it's singing WITH proper pronunciation. It can help in some situations, but not in others. If you want to see a good example of this, check out interviews with Oasis vs any of their songs. When they talk they're almost impossible to figure out. When they sing you can hear every word perfectly. Just decide what works best for you.
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#16
Quote by AlanHB
It's not singing WITHOUT an accent, it's singing WITH proper pronunciation. It can help in some situations, but not in others.


i appreciate your trying to hep, but mate i live in australia, and highly doubt your "proper pronunciation" is proper
#17
Quote by rsatrinations
i appreciate your trying to hep, but mate i live in australia, and highly doubt your "proper pronunciation" is proper


Wow, amazing that I would write such a large piece, even pointing out that "proper pronunciation" is English, and you still attack me on being Australian.
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