#1
I'm trying to mic my guitar amp with two mics, a condenser and a dynamic, a KSM27 and a SM57. I'm having trouble getting rid of the thin sound that's heard when both are turned up. It sounds like an airplane when the mic position is adjusted. Any help?
#2
What I would suggest doing is positioning your sm57 on the edge of the speaker, and then the KSM directly at the middle but about 5-6 inches off the speaker to let it breath a bit.
Gear
Jekyll and Hyde
DD3 Delay
NS2 Noise gate
FAB chorus
Crybaby 535Q
HT-5 stack
1979 Gretsch BST 1000
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Schecter Gryphon
Fender American Strat
Taylor T5 Custom
www.facebook.com/fadeoutproductions
#3
That is a phase problem.

You're introducing two similar signals out of phase with one another, so they are cancelling each other out in a lot of frequencies.
And when you move it around, it phases.

One way to prevent this is to observe the 3 to 1 rule, if one mic is 1 inch from the amp, for example, place the other about 3 inches away.
This is only a guideline and you should use it as something to start with and then experiment with positions.

If you want the tone of the 57 close up AND the KSM close up then you will need to record seperate takes of the same part in order to avoid phase problems altogether.

Here's a few semi-helpful links for more about the three to one rule and miking guitar amps in general.
http://www.wikirecording.org/3_to_1_Rule
http://www.wikirecording.org/Shure%27s_Microphone_Techniques_for_Studio_Recording_Section_One:_Amplified_Instruments#Electric_Guitar
#4
Quote by Rakoro
That is a phase problem.

You're introducing two similar signals out of phase with one another, so they are cancelling each other out in a lot of frequencies.
And when you move it around, it phases.

One way to prevent this is to observe the 3 to 1 rule, if one mic is 1 inch from the amp, for example, place the other about 3 inches away.
This is only a guideline and you should use it as something to start with and then experiment with positions.

If you want the tone of the 57 close up AND the KSM close up then you will need to record seperate takes of the same part in order to avoid phase problems altogether.

Here's a few semi-helpful links for more about the three to one rule and miking guitar amps in general.
http://www.wikirecording.org/3_to_1_Rule
http://www.wikirecording.org/Shure%27s_Microphone_Techniques_for_Studio_Recording_Section_One:_Amplified_Instruments#Electric_Guitar


This guy knows his shit and I would put money on this being the case. Make sure when you obey the three to one rule the microphones have an approximately equal gain with each other to boot (visually).
Owen - Sound Engineer - Mixing & Editing Available, PM for details.
#5
here's a couple things to try. put both of them right up next to the speaker and right next to each other without touching the speaker, or the other mic. i would get as close to the center of the cone as possible for a good starting point and work from there depending on the sound you need. if your amp has two (or more) speakers, you could put one mic on each cone. if you keep them the same distance away from the cones, you wont have phase issues.

or, put the 57 up close like the first example but use the KSM about 3ish feet back. adjust the distance of the KSM so that it's not out of phase. i know a lot of people who have done that kind of thing and gotten great results, but i personally do not like it. having the mic farther back brings up not only phase issues, but also adds room noise, and unless you have a great room it doesn't help the sound much at all. i always go with the first option and add any reverb it might need later. sure it's not as natural sounding, but for me, it works plenty well enough.
#6
put one mic at the sweet spot of axis near the edge and around 4.30 get the other in your hand an go round the cone with it
jackson dk2 2008
hamer xt sunburst qt
epiphone g400
peavey vk212
morley p wah
behringer pb1000
dige bm
big muff ny
behringer dc 9 comp
member of the Jackson/Charvel Owners Club

£8.50/58fund for a ROCKTRON HUSH SUPER C PEDAL
#7
You could also try flipping the polarity on one of the mikes, which will be marked "Ø", or a 0 with a slash through it.
This will put one of the mics 180 degrees out of phase and can help it sound less bad.

Or you could try lining up the waves themselves in your editor, I haven't tried this but I know a guy who did this with room mics and aligned them to the overheads and it sounded awesome.
#9
sounds like a phase problem when i read the question again
jackson dk2 2008
hamer xt sunburst qt
epiphone g400
peavey vk212
morley p wah
behringer pb1000
dige bm
big muff ny
behringer dc 9 comp
member of the Jackson/Charvel Owners Club

£8.50/58fund for a ROCKTRON HUSH SUPER C PEDAL