#1
So I was tuning my guitar up with an electronic tuner because it was very badly out of tune. I then proceeded to do some quick finger warm ups and mess around with some soloing.

In this solo I saw on the screen of the tuner that the bends are not 'perfect'. As in, the screen shows a range between 430 - 450 Hz, with 440 being in tune. Bent notes that sounded fine two my ears showed up between 435 - 445 Hz, not at 440, indicating not a perfect bend.

The question is this: are bends supposed to be 'perfectly in tune' to the note that you are bending to, are a mere approximation? In addition, what does this mean about the human ear? I've been playing music all my life, tuning by ear and learning songs by ear, but this 'approximation' sounded fine to me.

Now obviously this isn't an excuse for improper bends. One can't bend and blame their poor intonation on it 'sounding fine to them'. Unison bends cannot be half-assed, as they will sound like shit otherwise.

I'm just curious now.
Quote by Zero-Hartman
The Bible is awesome. Revelation is so badass, I mean, dragons and angels and the devil having an epic battle in the clouds? Badass.
#2
All measured things are approximations when you get down to it. The tuner itself is not perfect, either. Of course you do want good control over your bends, but they're not necessarily wrong if they don't match up with the twelve pitches on which your tuner is based. If it sounds right, it is.
Last edited by Dodeka at Jun 15, 2010,
#3
when you bend, you can go into microtones, between the semitones: use a slide, and play it in the middle of the fret: same thing.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
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#4
Hi Zero-Hartman, When you just stop and think of the nature of a bend it is virtually impossible to get it spot on every time. However, if you have been playing all your life by ear I would say your ear would be very good..I have done the same and can tune by ear then if I checked with a meter it would be close enough for jazz as we used to say. Also the strength with which you pluck a string and subsequent vibration will alter with a meter, I am sure you have seen at first no result and as the vibration settles its correct. A tip if you bend a lot as you obviously do is to rub a pencil across the "nut" so the graphite goes into the slots this lubricates the area and when bending returns to string to pitch quickly.

fenderflyer
#5
Quote by Shadow_Hawk
So I was tuning my guitar up with an electronic tuner because it was very badly out of tune. I then proceeded to do some quick finger warm ups and mess around with some soloing.

In this solo I saw on the screen of the tuner that the bends are not 'perfect'. As in, the screen shows a range between 430 - 450 Hz, with 440 being in tune. Bent notes that sounded fine two my ears showed up between 435 - 445 Hz, not at 440, indicating not a perfect bend.

The question is this: are bends supposed to be 'perfectly in tune' to the note that you are bending to, are a mere approximation? In addition, what does this mean about the human ear? I've been playing music all my life, tuning by ear and learning songs by ear, but this 'approximation' sounded fine to me.

Now obviously this isn't an excuse for improper bends. One can't bend and blame their poor intonation on it 'sounding fine to them'. Unison bends cannot be half-assed, as they will sound like shit otherwise.

I'm just curious now.


Generally you bend to a specific note. usually its a half step or whole step away..... but not always.


Definitely use your ear.... not a tuner.
shred is gaudy music
#7
435 to 450 is a good range I would think. You also have to factor that tuners like that aren't always fool proof. Timbre can really mess with them. But the two posts above me are spot on -- if you think it sounds good then what the tuner says doesn't really matter. If you're still not confident, ask an experienced guitarist/teacher how your bends sound. They would be able to tell you if you're not hitting it well enough.
i don't know why i feel so dry
#8
To practice my whole-step bends I typically play things like this, up and down the neck:

-------
---5--
---7b-
-------
-------
-------

In this example the bent note on the g-string (in this case a D bending up to E) should match the note on the b-string. I play these up the neck, and back down trying to match the two tones perfectly. It's also fun to play scales in this fashion.

When I am actually playing however, more often than not I end up adding a vibrato at the top of the bend. This kind of hides any sort of imperfections I might have.

Being a trombone player, my ear is generally pretty good though.
"Swords, nature's hell sticks."- Trip Fisk
Last edited by mtforever at Jun 16, 2010,
#9
im sure it just has alot to do with vibration/pitch. man, that is very close. the vibration of a string that has been bent, is alot more sensitive, because that string is really tight at the time. the vibrations are really quick where it is sooo tight. ofcourse the ear is the way to go lol
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when you just get tired of all the effects and riffs.

#10
Quote by fenderflyer
Hi Zero-Hartman, When you just stop and think of the nature of a bend it is virtually impossible to get it spot on every time. However, if you have been playing all your life by ear I would say your ear would be very good..I have done the same and can tune by ear then if I checked with a meter it would be close enough for jazz as we used to say. Also the strength with which you pluck a string and subsequent vibration will alter with a meter, I am sure you have seen at first no result and as the vibration settles its correct. A tip if you bend a lot as you obviously do is to rub a pencil across the "nut" so the graphite goes into the slots this lubricates the area and when bending returns to string to pitch quickly.

fenderflyer



um, zero-hartman didn't post in this thread. there's a quote of him in TS's signature though...


anyways, yea, what everyone else said. and seeing how the instrument uses equal temperament all of the notes except the open, 12th, and 24th fret will be slightly out of tune.