#1
Okay, so I didn't oil my fretboard in... well I wanna say about a year and a half so it was due for some treatment. I rubbed a decent amount of oil on it with a peice of cloth and then used a dry peice of cloth to rub it in further. Anyway, I left my guitar sitting for about 3 hours or so and when I came back, my guitar's fretboard was a much lighter shade of brown. It was originally quite dark, and I'm wondering if this is normal? Did I use too much oil or is that even really possible to use too much? Thanks for anyone who can help.
#4
What colour is the rag after you used it? Did it get dark? If it did you may simply have removed some dyeing from the fingerboard that was put there to make it look like ebony when it is actually something else.
BTW Lemon Oil is basically lemon oil for furniture. Branding it as "guitar oil" came later on.
Moving on.....
#5
Quote by KenG
What colour is the rag after you used it? Did it get dark? If it did you may simply have removed some dyeing from the fingerboard that was put there to make it look like ebony when it is actually something else.
BTW Lemon Oil is basically lemon oil for furniture. Branding it as "guitar oil" came later on.


Yeah, what I meant was the lemon oil from like the grocery store, which isn't lemon oil, it's lemon juice, so my bad.

I think your idea makes more sense though, cheap guitars might have stained fretboards.
#6
I can't think of any instance where oiling a fretboard would make it turn a lighter shade, unless as suggested, it was previously dyed and you've lifted that dye.

As an aside, the way you described applying the oil is completely and utterly wrong and is in fact very bad for your fretboard, colour change or not. You should only apply oil if the board is actually dried out (takes well over a year for most rosewood fretboards), you should only use a dry, inkless microfibre cloth and you're only supposed to use a very tiny amount of oil, literally two or three drops or brief squirts. You then apply it very lightly over the exposed wood, taking care not to use much pressure and to stay away from the fretwire itself and the nut and let the oil take to the wood naturally. From your description it sounds like you used probably the wrong sort of cloth, you used far too much oil and you didn't apply it properly. No wonder things have gone a bit wrong.
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#7
Yea, the oil is specifically meant for a guitar, it even says right on the bottle "fret board conditioner". It's been well over a year since I've applied any oil to the guitar. Like I said I wanna say about a year and a half. I actually did use a microfiber piece of cloth, I figured it could it only help. When I say I applied a decent amount, I mean a decent amount for what it is. I didn't apply much more than a few squirts into the cloth at a time. About really the only thing I didn't do was apply it particularly softly. I applied it like I would to a piece of furniture. Also the cloth didn't have much color on it, so I don't think I removed any stain it may have had on it.

Thanks for the help so far.
#9
It looks as though I did indeed apply too much oil onto it. Since looking at it today it actually looks like the wood has gotten a bit darker again. Well at least now I know about how much oil I should be applying. Does anyone know if there are any damages you can do to the wood from applying too much oil? Thanks again everyone.
Last edited by Dragonblood21 at Jun 16, 2010,
#11
Quote by Dragonblood21
Does anyone know if there are any damages you can do to the wood from applying too much oil? Thanks again everyone.
The fretboard (or entire neck) can warp and initally can expand slightly - if it spends quite a while in this state, when it begins to dry out again it can contract too much. When the fretboard expands, contracts or warps in any way, you have problems. It can become outright unplayable depending on how warped it becomes, frets can become loose or can be forced out, binding and inlays can shift or crack, the nut can come loose or shift, etc etc etc. Even if it's a change measuring in fractions of a millimetre and invisible toy our eye, it can still write off a neck. It's pretty much on-par with messing with the truss rod incorrectly or putting on really heavy strings in a tuning the neck isn't set up for.
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#12
Quote by MrFlibble
The fretboard (or entire neck) can warp and initally can expand slightly - if it spends quite a while in this state, when it begins to dry out again it can contract too much. When the fretboard expands, contracts or warps in any way, you have problems. It can become outright unplayable depending on how warped it becomes, frets can become loose or can be forced out, binding and inlays can shift or crack, the nut can come loose or shift, etc etc etc. Even if it's a change measuring in fractions of a millimetre and invisible toy our eye, it can still write off a neck. It's pretty much on-par with messing with the truss rod incorrectly or putting on really heavy strings in a tuning the neck isn't set up for.


Wow, now I am pretty majorly concerned @_@. Is there anyway to check for small damages that I wouldn't normally just be able to see? I'd assume my guitar wouldn't be able to be intone if there was a warp even if it was slightly. Also is there anything I can at this moment to help it? You said "if it spends quite a while in this state" so I'm wondering if there may be something I can do to or is the damage done?
Last edited by Dragonblood21 at Jun 16, 2010,
#13
It's probably fine if this is the only time you've done this. Problems usually only occur if someone repeatedly over-treats their fretboard over a short period of time. I know a couple of people who oiled their fretboards once every two weeks and sure enough within three months their guitars were ruined (one actually broke in spectacular fashion, the fretboard actually came off the neck. Mind you, that one was literally dripping with oil so you can imagine how much they had been pouring on it). If you have over-oiled the fretboard multiple times then my only advice would be to store the guitar near a fairly strong source of heat and hope your guitar was made with really crap wood so the oil has lots of pores to sit in. I have been told that leaving a guitar in direct sunlight can help a fretboard that has been over-oiled, but it's not something I would try myself since that could damage the rest of the neck even if it helps the fretboard.

Honestly, this is why I haven't bothered oiling any of my guitars' fretboards in the last five years. I only do it if I'm taking care of a guitar for someone else and they really insist on it; even then I try to persuade them otherwise.

From the sound of it you'll be fine for now, just make sure to not try oiling it again for quite a while and when you do, remember: you can always add more and do it a second time if you really need to, you can't take any off.
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#14
Quote by jpnyc
You probably just rubbed off a lot of dirt.


this. trust me, i had the same concern
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#15
Yea, this is the only time I have done this. No one ever told me that the fretboard was supposed to be oiled, and I read it up it should be oiled about once every year or 2, so I sort of panicked and went out to buy some oil for it to make sure I can continue to take care of it. I feel a lot more relieved that it will probably be okay. My guitar is a:

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Jackson-WRMG-Warrior-Electric-Guitar-w--EMGs-868341-i1445403.gc?source=4WFRWXX&CAWELAID=439933094

If it broke, I wouldn't have the money to even fix it for a while. So I was quite upset when I saw the color change and was praying it wasn't going to be a big problem. I will definitely keep in mind that I should only apply a small amount of oil at first, and add more later if it still needs it, now that I'm aware of the problems it can cause.

I know I've said it before, but thanks again so much for the help. I've learned a lot.

Quote by Banjocal
this. trust me, i had the same concern


Nothing really came off the cloth though. It was still pretty clean even after being used. Not only that the change didn't happen right there and then, it was after I left it for a few hours is when I noticed it. I'm about 95% sure it was me adding too much oil now. It makes the most sense.
Last edited by Dragonblood21 at Jun 16, 2010,