#1
All I really want to be able to do is change fluidly between D, G, and A. I practice and practice.... for some reason I just can't do it. G is hard to transition to, but all of it is fairly hard. For all the progress I've made in being able to form a chord, even without watching my hand, strumming, and overall dexterity; I've been at almost the exact same spot in being able to change chords. I just feel like I must be approaching it the wrong way - like I'm just thinking about it wrong.

Any advice?
#3
Yeah dude, there's no magic way to get better. You just have to keep practicing. Eventually your hand will be able to make the right shape for the chords without you even thinking about it. But you have to keep practicing.
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#4
+1. Just keep practising.
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#5
going from D to G is hard i must agree.
but just keep at it slowly and it will come to you. I'm glad that you got the hang of G and havn't thrown your guitar out of the window.
xD

I normally play an Eminor and transition to G
but thats just me i guess
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#6
Just take your time, use a really slow metronome if you must. Most important, especially early on, is to have fun with it. Just doodling around is a good skill to have too!
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#7
I find the D to G a lot easier using the 4 fingered version of G. Then, you have your ring finger on the third fret of the B string already, so can just leave that down and pivot the hand around this to form the chord.
#8
Quote by Zingledot
All I really want to be able to do is change fluidly between D, G, and A. I practice and practice.... for some reason I just can't do it. G is hard to transition to, but all of it is fairly hard. For all the progress I've made in being able to form a chord, even without watching my hand, strumming, and overall dexterity; I've been at almost the exact same spot in being able to change chords. I just feel like I must be approaching it the wrong way - like I'm just thinking about it wrong.

Any advice?


Try just switching between D and G until you get it down, then try to add an A chord. It is much easier to learn to switch those two chords before trying all three. I have some videos on my website on how to play those chords if you need some help.

Also - I recommend playing the G major chord with your:
  • 1st finger on the 2nd fret on the A string
  • 2nd finger on the 3rd fret on the low E string
  • 3rd finger on the 3rd fret on the B string
  • 4th finger on the 3rd fret on the high E string


Hope that helps,
Jeff