#1
our band is making its first song,
after we played like Adtr, confide and AILD

we wanted to make some Metalcore verse riffs and posthardcore chorus riffs
but i'm stuck at writing it down im i cant find anything new to this

INTRO Clean with some delay , lead guitar play's it


d---------0-----------------5--------------8--------------8-----------5---
a-----6-----6----------6------6--------6--------6-----6-------------6---
f--------7-----7-----------7-----7-------7----7---------7---7------7----
c---0----------------5---------------5--------------0----------------5----
g----------------------------------------------------------------------------
c----------------------------------------------------------------------------

but i don't know what the rythme guitar needs to play on this?

then the verse riff Lead part also don't know the harmony on this?

D---------------------------------------------------------------------
A---------------------------------------------------------------------
F---------------------------------------------------------------------
C-----------------------------888888-101010101010----------
G----8-7-8-10-8-7h8-8---888888-101010101010----------
C-00-------------------------888888-101010101010----------
pm

and then the
chorus riff ??? how should it be build ? any help ?
#2
D---------------------------------------------------------------------
A---------------------------------------------------------------------
F---------------------------------------------------------------------
C----7-5-7--8--7-5h7-7---888888-101010101010----------
G-----------------------------888888-101010101010----------
C-00-------------------------888888-101010101010----------


There's the harmony.


In my restless dreams...
I see that town.
Silent Hill.
You promised you'd take me there again someday.
But you never did.

Well, I'm alone there now.
In our 'special place'...
Waiting for you.

#3
thx
anyone could help me how i could build up a chorus riff from that ? or that sounds nice to that ?
#4
Alot of times, people will do all of the riffing in the verses, bridge and intro, but in the chorus, they will stick with a simple chord progression, or power chords or stuff like that. Try messing around with something like that i guess...

I'll play the riffs already on in a minute and see if I can give some better advise.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#5
as said before, the chorus can be dead simple. It usually is in Metalcore songs. Check out NJ Legion Iced Tea by ADTR.

D:---------------------------------|
A:---------------------------------|
F:-6-6-6/7-7-7-7/14141414/11111111-|
C:-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x--x-x-x-x--|
G:-4-4-4/5-5-5-5/12121212/9-9-9-9--|
C:---------------------------------|

D:---------------------------------|
A:---------------------------------|
F:---------------------------------|
C:-9999999-5555555-0000000-7777777-|
G:-9999999-5555555-0000000-7777777-|
C:-9999999-5555555-0000000-7777777-|

Notice how one guitar is just doing a simple almost pop chord progression, and the "lead" guitar is doing an octave lead. They started on the "2nd" for the octave, to give it that darker feel.
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#6
Everything you've got here looks to be in C minor (C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, Bb), so you can use those notes in the scale to harmonize the single-note sections in the riffs. If you want to take the approach that many metalcore/hardcore bands take, you can harmonize it in thirds (the note C plays with Eb, D plays with F, Eb plays with G, etc.). Or, alternatively, you could harmonize in fifths, fourths, octaves, or any other combination that fits and is in key.

Wait, do you know names of notes on the fretboard? If not, that probably didn't make any sense. I can probably explain it more coherently if you want.
#7
Quote by NathanielLost
Everything you've got here looks to be in C minor (C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, Bb), so you can use those notes in the scale to harmonize the single-note sections in the riffs. If you want to take the approach that many metalcore/hardcore bands take, you can harmonize it in thirds (the note C plays with Eb, D plays with F, Eb plays with G, etc.). Or, alternatively, you could harmonize in fifths, fourths, octaves, or any other combination that fits and is in key.

Wait, do you know names of notes on the fretboard? If not, that probably didn't make any sense. I can probably explain it more coherently if you want.


i'm at level 0 on theory i only know 1 scale like the major , but
i dont know how to harmonize,look at notes etc etc...
so it would be nice if you could help it out a bit
#8
i'm at level 0 on theory i only know 1 scale like the major , but
i dont know how to harmonize,look at notes etc etc...
so it would be nice if you could help it out a bit


Ok man, no problem.
So you do know the major scale pattern, right? Now, playing in a minor key (with a minor scale) can be done with the same set of notes, but with a different tonal center (the pitch or chord that the music resolves to). For example, C major contains the notes C, D, E, F, G, A, and B, whereas A minor contains A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.

As I'm sure you know, the major scale has a pattern of whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step (a whole step being two frets and a half step being one; play a major scale on guitar, you'll see what I mean). However, the minor scale pattern is the same set of intervals, but it starts from the sixth note in the major scale: it has a pattern of whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step.

Determining the key of a song ultimately comes down to where the song resolves; that is, what chord seems to "complete" the progression at the end of the song (there's a really nice sticky at the top of this forum that was written by people who can explain music theory over the internet many times as well as I can if you want to read more about those specifics).

Now it may seem like I just complicated everything a lot with that wall of text, intervals are obviously important to understand harmonizing. Back to what you were saying about your riffs (which I'm diggin' btw), all of them seem to fall into C minor, which has the notes C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, and Bb. Whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step. These notes can be found by playing open, second, third, fifth, seventh, eighth, and tenth frets on your D string (which you have tuned to C), along with a host of other places.

Now, harmonization can occur in many different ways, but a method that hardcore/metalcore bands really seem to like is to harmonize in thirds. That is, playing the first note of the scale along with the third note, playing the second note with the fourth note, the third with the fifth, etc. If you look at the example that Alpha_Wolf posted, he paired the 8 on the A string (which you've tuned to G, just saying that to not get confused) with 7 on the D string (which you've tuned to C). The 8th fret on the fifth string that you've played is an Eb, and he's paired it with the 7th fret on the fourth string, which is a G.

I suggest you read the theory sticky (I think it's still there anyway), or any other reputable source for scale and interval theory, then conventions for harmonizing will become pretty clear pretty quickly. Apologies if I did a bad job explaining things, I'm not the best theory teacher in the world, haha.
#9
Quote by NathanielLost
Ok man, no problem.
So you do know the major scale pattern, right? Now, playing in a minor key (with a minor scale) can be done with the same set of notes, but with a different tonal center (the pitch or chord that the music resolves to). For example, C major contains the notes C, D, E, F, G, A, and B, whereas A minor contains A, B, C, D, E, F, and G.

As I'm sure you know, the major scale has a pattern of whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, whole step, half step (a whole step being two frets and a half step being one; play a major scale on guitar, you'll see what I mean). However, the minor scale pattern is the same set of intervals, but it starts from the sixth note in the major scale: it has a pattern of whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step.

Determining the key of a song ultimately comes down to where the song resolves; that is, what chord seems to "complete" the progression at the end of the song (there's a really nice sticky at the top of this forum that was written by people who can explain music theory over the internet many times as well as I can if you want to read more about those specifics).

Now it may seem like I just complicated everything a lot with that wall of text, intervals are obviously important to understand harmonizing. Back to what you were saying about your riffs (which I'm diggin' btw), all of them seem to fall into C minor, which has the notes C, D, Eb, F, G, Ab, and Bb. Whole step, half step, whole step, whole step, half step, whole step, whole step. These notes can be found by playing open, second, third, fifth, seventh, eighth, and tenth frets on your D string (which you have tuned to C), along with a host of other places.

Now, harmonization can occur in many different ways, but a method that hardcore/metalcore bands really seem to like is to harmonize in thirds. That is, playing the first note of the scale along with the third note, playing the second note with the fourth note, the third with the fifth, etc. If you look at the example that Alpha_Wolf posted, he paired the 8 on the A string (which you've tuned to G, just saying that to not get confused) with 7 on the D string (which you've tuned to C). The 8th fret on the fifth string that you've played is an Eb, and he's paired it with the 7th fret on the fourth string, which is a G.

I suggest you read the theory sticky (I think it's still there anyway), or any other reputable source for scale and interval theory, then conventions for harmonizing will become pretty clear pretty quickly. Apologies if I did a bad job explaining things, I'm not the best theory teacher in the world, haha.



i only knew like the scale, with tabs like
--x--I----I----I--x--I----
--x--I----I----I--x--I----
--x--I----I--x--I----I----
--x--I----I--x--I----I----
--x--I----I--x--I----I----
--x--I----I----I--x--I----

i can't or don't understand somthing diffrent
so the letters you say like C etc is it like ?
--x--I----I----I--x--I----
--x--I----I----I--x--I----
--B--I----I--x--I----I----
--G--I----I--A--I----I----
--E--I----I--F--I----I----
--C--I----I----I--D--I----
#12
Quote by againstcore
i only knew like the scale, with tabs like
--x--I----I----I--x--I----
--x--I----I----I--x--I----
--x--I----I--x--I----I----
--x--I----I--x--I----I----
--x--I----I--x--I----I----
--x--I----I----I--x--I----

i can't or don't understand somthing diffrent
so the letters you say like C etc is it like ?
--x--I----I----I--x--I----
--x--I----I----I--x--I----
--B--I----I--x--I----I----
--G--I----I--A--I----I----
--E--I----I--F--I----I----
--C--I----I----I--D--I----


That looks like the C minor pentatonic scale, not the major scale, so it would be more like this;
--C--|----|----|--Eb-|----
--G--|----|----|--Bb-|----
--Eb-|----|--F--|----|----
--Bb-|----|--C--|----|----
--F--|----|--G--|----|----
--C--|----|----|--Eb-|----

If you want the rest of the notes in the C minor scale, it would look like this;
--C--|----|--D--|--Eb-|----
--G--|----|--A--|--Bb-|----
--Eb-|----|--F--|----|----
--Bb-|----|--C--|----|--D--
--F--|----|--G--|----|--A--
--C--|----|--D--|--Eb-|----

And C Major scale would look like this;
--C--|----|--D--|----|--E--
-----|----|--A--|----|--B--
----|--E--|--F--|----|--G--
----|--B--|--C--|----|--D--
--F--|----|--G--|----|--A--
--C--|----|--D--|----|--E--

If this is confusing you, and you don't get anything just ask...

Edit: (this is all just in normal E tuning)
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"
#14
Quote by dIRV
What isthe tuning that you are using on the guitar aswell.


i got my ltd, on drop c and the micheal kelly on standard E
but the tab is in drop c
Fails are daily message's
#15
In all honesty you're not in a position to be "helped" here - if you really don't know any theory nobody can help you understand harmony save for doing it for you.

In the meantime you need to stick to writing material that's within your capabilities. If you want to write something more complex then you're going to have to take the time to learn how to do it yourself, as it stands you're basically asking people to write your song for you.
Actually called Mark!

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#16
Quote by steven seagull
In all honesty you're not in a position to be "helped" here - if you really don't know any theory nobody can help you understand harmony save for doing it for you.

In the meantime you need to stick to writing material that's within your capabilities. If you want to write something more complex then you're going to have to take the time to learn how to do it yourself, as it stands you're basically asking people to write your song for you.



yeah i know i will need to stick to it and i'm going to need to learn it, but i don't realy know where to start i could start learning scales but i can't place them in section i need them ? but the harmony i need to understand it but i will try if i wanna be a decent player, i will need to do get my hands on it
Fails are daily message's
#17
I found a really good theory learning site, it's called musictheory.net, just click on lessons, and start from the begining, it pretty much covers all the basics, and really good for begingers.
Quote by leg end

"Roses are red,
Violets are bitchin'
Goddammit woman,
get back in the kitchen"