#1
these are usually done with Drop tunings, I see bands like Killswitch Engage do these quite often, but I never thought to ask.

Heres an example:

|-------------------------|
|-------------------------|
|-------------------------|
|---5--7-----------------|
|---3--5-----------------|
|---5--7-----------------|
#2
They're Minor 7 chords. Not power chords btw.

EDIT: Just realised it's a drop tuning. In that case, they are inverted power chords, because the 5th is in the bass.
Last edited by Declan87 at Jun 16, 2010,
#4
I assume that your example is in a drop tuning.

Putting it in a standard tuning:

|-------------------------|
|-------------------------|
|-------------------------|
|---5--7-----------------|
|---3--5-----------------|
|---3--5-----------------|

They are inverted power chords. Instead of having the tonic at the root, you have the fifth as the root. And you also doubled the fifth.

You would write those two as: C5/G, D5/A
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#6
id call them perfect forth intervals to be honest
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#7
It all depends on context. It's just that I've always encountered them as inverted power chords.
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