#1
I've been writing stuff that start slow and build up later. Now I just want to rip it off and go as loud as possible.

I'm not a bluesy-rock fan, but more of a modern sounding guy. I've noticed how stuff like Linkin Park tear everything apart cause their music is built on heavy, big riffs.

So, I just want some advice on what to use and emphasize on in order to write pure, loud, aggressive songs like One Step Closer and Don't Stay, albeit quite more complex.

Thanks.
#5
1. Be loud

2. Crushing overdrive

3. Power chords
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#6
I immediately thought of fat girls when I read the title.
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#7
How to make a huge, chunky sounding riff (by Linkin Park standards...):

Turn on some thick distortion, lots of mids, decent amount of lows, not much treble.
Detune guitar to at least Drop C.
Use powerchords with an added note above like so:
D|-
A|-
F|-
C|5
G|3
C|3
Then, double that track in the studio (One panned left, one panned right)
Have the bass follow the guitar line, one octave down. Also, the bass should be slightly distorted.

You have a huge sounding riff, by Linkin Park standards.
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#8
Ummm, couldn't make out what you were saying, but if you want big heavy Black Sabbath style riffs, heavy power chords and minors are necessary. If you're looking for newer sounding heavy riffs, I would use octaves, minor power chord slides and not many open chords (obviously)
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#9
Quote by Jsteele1408
How to make a huge, chunky sounding riff (by Linkin Park standards...):

Turn on some thick distortion, lots of mids, decent amount of lows, not much treble.
Detune guitar to at least Drop C.
Use powerchords with an added note above like so:
D|-
A|-
F|-
C|5
G|3
C|3
Then, double that track in the studio (One panned left, one panned right)
Have the bass follow the guitar line, one octave down. Also, the bass should be slightly distorted.

You have a huge sounding riff, by Linkin Park standards.


Thanks, but this is what I already know. I'm talking about actually creating the ostinatos.
eg which scales use, which notes to emphasize, rythms, anything more advanced that "just play powr chrdz lol".

And IMO, detuning is a retarded way of making a song heavier.
#11
Quote by ingames
Thanks, but this is what I already know. I'm talking about actually creating the ostinatos.
eg which scales use, which notes to emphasize, rythms, anything more advanced that "just play powr chrdz lol".

And IMO, detuning is a retarded way of making a song heavier.


Lmao. I guess you don't understand sarcasm when you see it.

Here's a thought: Maybe in the future, actually describe what you want people to tell you from the beginning. Not just saying "how do I make a huge sounding riff?" because... that's apparently not what you want to know at all.

Making a "huge sounding riff" has little to do with scales and rhythms. You could make Yankee Doodle Dandy sound huge with the right dynamics.

Also, being less of a dick helps.
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#12
Quote by ingames
Thanks, but this is what I already know. I'm talking about actually creating the ostinatos.
eg which scales use, which notes to emphasize, rythms, anything more advanced that "just play powr chrdz lol".

And IMO, detuning is a retarded way of making a song heavier.


No offence, but if you want LP big riffs, you're gunna be "just playing powr chrdz lol" and detuning.

Scales to use? Anything minor, to be honest
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#13
Really, all the advice you're gonna get is to play power chords. And you're going to get eaten alive for being a LP fan. In my opinion, heavy = slow. I couldn't agree more with the downtuning thing though, it's very stupid.
#14
Well Linkin Park uses a lot of power chords with a lot of distortion to get their heavy sound. If you want for complex stuff with that, I suggest laying down a base (not bass) track or the power chords you want, then play something more complicated on top. Also, a lot of their sound comes from the drums being so driving. Get a good drummer who knows how to add to and push what your trying to do with his drumming.
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#15
Quote by ingames
Thanks, but this is what I already know. I'm talking about actually creating the ostinatos.
eg which scales use, which notes to emphasize, rythms, anything more advanced that "just play powr chrdz lol".

And IMO, detuning is a retarded way of making a song heavier.


Study their songs, see what's going on, what they're doing.

Down tuning is perfectly legitimate way of getting heavier. Without that, the heaviest you'll be able to go is the low E on the guitar.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#16
Quote by rockingamer2
Study their songs, see what's going on, what they're doing.

Down tuning is perfectly legitimate way of getting heavier. Without that, the heaviest you'll be able to go is the low E on the guitar.



Yes, Study. Always study what you like.

Only tune down if you really need to. A lower not doesn't make anything more heavy...

Without that, the LOWEST you'll be able to go is the low E on the guitar.
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#17
Quote by Jasonbts
Yes, Study. Always study what you like.

Only tune down if you really need to. A lower not doesn't make anything more heavy...

Without that, the LOWEST you'll be able to go is the low E on the guitar.


Like it or not, a lower tuning will make things sound heavier. Play a heavey riff on the low e, then play the same on a 7 string's low B.

It sounds heavier. Unsurprisingly
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#18
Quote by pigeonmafia
Like it or not, a lower tuning will make things sound heavier. Play a heavey riff on the low e, then play the same on a 7 string's low B.

It sounds heavier. Unsurprisingly


No, it sounds lower. To get a heavier sound you add more distortion and set the pickups as much bridge as possible. "Heavy" here is being used to describe the crunch, and the feel, not how low or bass-y .
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#19
The lower the notes go, the more droning they are: giving a heavier feel.

If you define heavey as how it feels, lower tuning will make it heavier.
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#20
^ actually any tuning can be heavy, i could write something in G minor and make it sound heavy, a large part of the chunky metal sound is in the tone of the guitar/amp and in a final product sense a good equal mix of guitars and bass.

Quote by pigeonmafia
Like it or not, a lower tuning will make things sound heavier. Play a heavey riff on the low e, then play the same on a 7 string's low B.

It sounds heavier. Unsurprisingly

really it just makes it tonally lower. what makes music sound "heavy" is a combination of things including tone,timbre,dynamics and a decent mix. in fact, when you break it down thats what makes any song have any specific feel.

a good example is pantera's "f#cking hostile" which is in Ab. if you listen to professional recordings (like REALLY listen) you'll notice that while guitars aren't really lacking in the low end, theres not that much emphasized. theres a between mid low and mids that actually gives most guitars that punchy sound. good bass mixed in brings those mids, mid lows and basses together so that if everyones playing perfectly in time, it gives that big "chugga" or "kerchunk" sound.
Last edited by z4twenny at Jun 17, 2010,
#21
I didn't say it had to be low to be heavy.

Just that a lower tuning makes it heavier
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#22
Quote by pigeonmafia
Like it or not, a lower tuning will make things sound heavier. Play a heavey riff on the low e, then play the same on a 7 string's low B.

It sounds heavier. Unsurprisingly

I have made people think i was playing in drop c, while on a telecaster, tuning has very little to do with how heavy something is. It can give the illusion of heaviness, but its merely dynamic changes the player makes for the different pitch(thats my theory)
#23
Quote by pigeonmafia
I didn't say it had to be low to be heavy.

Just that a lower tuning makes it heavier



so playing the lowest end of a piano is brutal?

i think thats a poor misconception is all. theres far more to being heavy than a tuning
i edited my last post w/ a little more info, you might get something from it.

a personal example i have (and if you get a chance, try it at a music store) my 7 string diamond hellraiser sounds far less "heavy" than my les paul in standard tuning. the reason? the body wood, the neck and the pickups.
Last edited by z4twenny at Jun 17, 2010,
#24
*sigh*

of course not, but then playing any riff on a piano won't sound brutal.

And, yet again. I didn't say the best way to get a heavy riff is to tune lower: just that a lower tuning will make a riff heavier sounding than it currently is
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#25
Quote by pigeonmafia
*sigh*

of course not, but then playing any riff on a piano won't sound brutal.

And, yet again. I didn't say the best way to get a heavy riff is to tune lower: just that a lower tuning will make a riff heavier sounding than it currently is

oh ooook.... are you one of those "it has to be a guitar with a gallon of distortion to be heavy" folks?

edit : nm, alexi laiho addict nuff said.
#26
not a tonn of gain, no. Some would be nice.

What's wrong with Laiho? :P
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#27
Quote by pigeonmafia
*sigh*

of course not, but then playing any riff on a piano won't sound brutal.



I'm pretty sure "Apocalypse Please" by Muse could be considered "brutal" and heavy. That entire song is on a piano. Also, the opening notes of Beethoven's 5th would be considered "brutal" by some, and those notes are more in the midrange of a piano.
#28
Quote by TasianSensation
I'm pretty sure "Apocalypse Please" by Muse could be considered "brutal" and heavy. That entire song is on a piano. Also, the opening notes of Beethoven's 5th would be considered "brutal" by some, and those notes are more in the midrange of a piano.


I guess it all depends on what your definition of heavy is. I've always thought of heavy as being a term for more guitar driven music, with things like Apocalypse being moody or dramatic as opposed to heavy
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Last edited by pigeonmafia at Jun 17, 2010,
#29
Quote by pigeonmafia
I guess it all depends on what your definition of heavy is. I've always thought of heavy as being a term for more guitar driven music, with things like Apocalypse being moody or dramatic as opposed to heavy

indeed and nothing wrong with laiho man why does it have to be for guitar? i've heard some south american tribal stuff before thats more brutal than some of the european death metal.... it was mostly percussion of various forms mixed with people singing/whooping/yelling. i guess my question is why does it have to be a guitar thing? i mean when you think about it, its still moody and dramatic and sometimes uptempo, just instead of a piano its on a guitar with some distortion.

in the end is it just the distortion? i've heard tons of NIN and skinny puppy that was pretty friggin heavy and didn't have a single noticeable guitar in it.
#30
I guess, for me, heavy is a combination of tone (so yeah, bit of gain in there ) lower tunings alot of the time but not always, and tonality of the music.

So, I associate guitar driven stuff with that because that's where it's most often used. Though I agree, some of the weird effects people put on synths and keyboards can be damn heavy!
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#31
Id say to get the.....deep, crunchy, strong, powerful kinda sound that you are talking about. youll need a distortion that has a very strong punch, very sustained punch, one that when you hit it, it will last forever. then you can ( if in E) play a really good power type rhythym, maybe doubled for more "fullness" (its catchy in an effects kinda way) then using imagination, some creativity, and good rhythym, make a melodic riff using something like the C major. the lower c major would probably work better that it is lower in tone, so the riff and the rhythym will almost blend as one. so when you hear it it will simply sound HUGE.

second key is....effects effects effects. Linkin Park does a large amount of effects (which have a good "flowing" kinda sound)

youve just gotta think man.

Ive got some other things I could say, but I dont know that it would really help any. Hope I could help you a little bit, you may already know all that.
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---------------------------

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----------------------

when you just get tired of all the effects and riffs.

#33
Quote by rockingamer2
Skip to 3:35 in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9uMfXh4OOx8
That's pretty heavy, especially considering it debuted in 1913.


Yeah. That's the 1913 version of Djent.
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#34
Quote by Jsteele1408
Yeah. That's the 1913 version of Djent.

f#ck i hate that term

i play mostly kerchunk and chugga chugga but no djent