#1
Hello,

I just finished recording guitar and piano for a song, and while the piano sounds great the guitar sounds pretty raw, and lacks the tightness generally associated with studio recording. I'm using a pretty good guitar simulation VST with a pretty low-end First Act guitar-to-USB cable, and I can't replace or upgrade my equipment for the time being. Is there any way to take a Reaper track and clean up the imperfections in the sound? Thanks.
#2
theres tons of ways to clean up tracks to get them to sound better. i guess the first question i have is, whats wrong? if you don't know whats wrong we can't work on fixing it. you say it doesn't have tightness? are you sure thats the right word as tightness is generally considered a playing issue (ie a timing issue) and not a recording issue.
#3
Yeah that's probably not the right word. I guess what I'm trying to say is that it adds these imperfections to the notes that make the playing sound kind of sloppy, but you can't hear them when playing through an amp. Plus, my equipment isn't the best so there is some feedback and buzzing that becomes noticeable throughout the track. I've never tried to record anything myself before, so I am pretty lost when it comes to the clean-up process.
#4
You have to really clear these things up at the source I'm afraid, there are editing techniques but this can only be applied to looseness or tiny specific instances, any continual or systematic problems need treated in a more direct manner.
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#5
Alright thanks. I guess I'll either rerecord or just learn to live with it. Do you think the fact that I'm using a USB-to-guitar cable might be a factor?
#6
Quote by Beefmo
You have to really clear these things up at the source I'm afraid, there are editing techniques but this can only be applied to looseness or tiny specific instances, any continual or systematic problems need treated in a more direct manner.

this is the correct answer, im not sure what exactly its "adding" but if its stuff like "i can hear the strings scraping" or something to that effect then its all in the technique. im of the avid belief that a good clean up requires very little tweaking.

i'm currently educating myself in the recording/mixing/mastering arts and the 1 universal truth that any recording engineer will tell you is SISO - sound in/sound out which basically means that whatever you want your final tone to be, thats what it needs to be going in. the clean up process usually is something along the lines of cutting off really low or high frequencies for that instrument and slight boosting or decreases to eq ranges.

for the buzzing you might try a noise gate (though those will kill dynamics if you use them too heavily) or you might want to figure out why its buzzing? is your guitar not grounded well? are there some loose wires? is it your guitar cable or the amp?
Last edited by z4twenny at Jun 17, 2010,
#7
Quote by iro-bot31
Alright thanks. I guess I'll either rerecord or just learn to live with it. Do you think the fact that I'm using a USB-to-guitar cable might be a factor?


Yes. They produce awful quality recordings if you're looking at getting a good studio sound. Wouldn't use them for anything more than messing around on Youtube.

They're noisy, and they compress your playing. It kills off the dynamics and even the tone of your instrument. That's likely why it sounds lackluster.
#8
Quote by Ziphoblat
Yes. They produce awful quality recordings if you're looking at getting a good studio sound. Wouldn't use them for anything more than messing around on Youtube.

They're noisy, and they compress your playing. It kills off the dynamics and even the tone of your instrument. That's likely why it sounds lackluster.

I can definitely attest to that. Messes up the sound really bad.