#1
I'm trying to write a solo guitar piece, but I'm kinda stuck and getting really frustrated I'm not entirely (sp?) new to writing pieces, but I really want this one to be really good. I have melodies floating around in my brain and they sound pretty cool to me, but I'm having a hard time turning them into something that's intricate, but still beautiful.
Is there anything, like steps to take or something, that might help me get organized? I'm open to any and all suggestions. thanks
#2
Hate to say it, but 'practice makes perfect'.

... and you spelt 'entirely' correctly.

I had trouble writing before earlier this year, when I suddenly started to write like a bastart on steroids; it just needs practice.
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Last edited by sfaune92 at Jun 18, 2010,
#3
Train your ear to recognize intervals. So when your trying to write something, you will have an idea of where the next note will be on the guitar.
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#4
Quote by emily92
I'm trying to write a solo guitar piece, but I'm kinda stuck and getting really frustrated I'm not entirely (sp?) new to writing pieces, but I really want this one to be really good. I have melodies floating around in my brain and they sound pretty cool to me, but I'm having a hard time turning them into something that's intricate, but still beautiful.
Is there anything, like steps to take or something, that might help me get organized? I'm open to any and all suggestions. thanks



Play until something moves you, start with the melody. It may be simple. Some of the best loved pieces are actually very simple at the basics. Then decide how to harmonize it. Do you want it bare and simple or melodic, like using 7ths 9ths etc.
#5
okay thanks guys. I guess I'll just have to mess around with it a little bit. Usually I can play a little bit of what I want it to sound like on the guitar, and then I can pretty much hear the rest of how I want it to sound in my head, but I start to lose it if I hear other music playing somewhere. so I guess it might also be a lack of focus
#6
Quote by emily92
okay thanks guys. I guess I'll just have to mess around with it a little bit. Usually I can play a little bit of what I want it to sound like on the guitar, and then I can pretty much hear the rest of how I want it to sound in my head, but I start to lose it if I hear other music playing somewhere. so I guess it might also be a lack of focus


it's possible, but i'd bet that it's probably that you haven't trained your ear.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#7
Have you learned any theory, like major scale intervals, chord construction, etc.?

Learning those basics can really help eliminate the guess and check or aimless noodling of translating the melodies from your head to the guitar.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#8
Quote by hockeyplayer168
Have you learned any theory, like major scale intervals, chord construction, etc.?

Learning those basics can really help eliminate the guess and check or aimless noodling of translating the melodies from your head to the guitar.


yeah I've taken two years of theory in high school, plus my guitar teacher goes over lots of theory in my lessons, but I am lacking as far as ear training goes
#9
Quote by emily92
yeah I've taken two years of theory in high school, plus my guitar teacher goes over lots of theory in my lessons, but I am lacking as far as ear training goes

Cool, well do you record yourself when you play? In my opinion, the easiest way to write a solo is to write it piece by piece. I always forget licks that I just played so that is a way to force yourself to follow one direction.

Just focus on playing simple ideas in your head. If you find it hard to translate complicated melodies to the guitar, slow down and simplify or it kind of defeats the purpose of "playing music."

But yes, it comes down to ear training, like you said. Practice will pay off if you diligently stick to playing what is in your head.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#10
Quote by hockeyplayer168
Cool, well do you record yourself when you play? In my opinion, the easiest way to write a solo is to write it piece by piece. I always forget licks that I just played so that is a way to force yourself to follow one direction.

Just focus on playing simple ideas in your head. If you find it hard to translate complicated melodies to the guitar, slow down and simplify or it kind of defeats the purpose of "playing music."

But yes, it comes down to ear training, like you said. Practice will pay off if you diligently stick to playing what is in your head.

ok thanks
#11
Write it down the instant you play it.

I write everything down in tab then change it to notation. Tab is faster and it allows you to get the idea down before it wanders away. Also remember to not try and force a peice together.

Sounds like a strange way to describe it but if you know where you want to start and end and a basic theme to have (riff) you can make a peice happen by just feeling through it.

Don't forget to write it down while it's fresh, maybe carry a notepad of Tab around with you it's often when you stop trying/thinking about something that it will just happen.