#1
I know alot of the singing basics, but punk rock seems to break alot of the rules of singing. Alot of the singers are very nasally and alot of the singers don't sound like just regular kind of voices, but they still sound very good. How do you get this? I dont mean like rancid or hardcore punk, Im talking more like Greenday, nofx, broadway calls, The Influents, Screeching Weesle bands like that.
#2
smoke lots of things its just attitude nothing else
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#4
i dont necessarily the too much smoking kinda voice, im talking about that like nasally kinda voice thing, like anti flag and stuff like that. How do they make that sound right
#5
hmmm lots of punk bands sing at the very top of their range and use chorus to bolster the strength of it. Don't know who anti flag is but are you talking about what Davey Havok from AFI does as well?

If so its not hard to accomplish you just need to sing in your upper range and use more of your nose while singing it. If you attempt to mimic one of those guys you will probably get it rather quickly.
#6
There really isn't much to it.

All you need is the energy of a show and attitude. Keep in mind that while everyone can sing, not everyone can sing in every style. For example, I can typically sing jazz and showtunes, but give me a rock song and i'll sound terrible.

Another thing is that punk singers usually sing with a very thick accent, after checking your profile I see that you are from Maryland while most of the bands you posted are from California. The accent does effect it.
#7
Quote by JacobTheMe
Keep in mind that while everyone can sing, not everyone can sing in every style. For example, I can typically sing jazz and showtunes, but give me a rock song and i'll sound terrible.


This comment is full of fallacy to be blunt. Yes, most folks that sing have natural talents that lend themselves to certain genres but to say you cannot sing in a different style is preposterous. I understand what you are trying to say but it is a misleading statement (unintended I'm sure) that can cause a new singer to give up.

Technique/style can be learned. To counter his example, I have an extremely decent country/songwriter voice, but I didn't want to be in that genre. As such I picked up some classical training and now front a melodic death metal group. If you want it, you have to be prepared to work for it