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#1
Picking Accuracy Part 1: Even Attack, Warming Up, Due Diligence, Training Fido

(Disclaimer: these are videos I made a few years ago to get better at video editing, so they are as-is/one-shot live lessons, I never did get better at editing, but I thought these could definitely help someone...hence why I am posting them)

OBJECTIVE Using Even Attack Using Alternate Picking While Changing Fretboard Positions

PLAY THIS TO A METRONOME!!!

What I see with a lot of students is when I give them information on a scale and show them a few different position, they play each position differently when it comes to right and left hand control.

There's nothing wrong with this, except that they do it without knowing it...since they don't know, they can't control it. I always try to make students aware when they are connecting the listening and playing together. This lessons helps not only make them aware of it but also allows them to hear it.

This exercise will show you one scale (a plain old G Major) played in three forms. I call it "3 G Scales".

The exercise challenges you to play each position the same in each position to where if someone heard a recording of you playing it, they wouldn't know you were changing positions at all.

This helps immensely with not only pick control but also to help you control how you attack the string with your pick. IOW, to be able to play a scales individual notes at the same volume and with the same touch whether the scale uses open string notes or fretted notes, regardless of the physical pattern.

Tab and notation are included in the video for you to get the exercise correct.

This is not meant to be a speed exercise but you can make what you want out of it. But it's not taught with speed in mind but picking control.

It is meant for you to completely control what you are going to play and play it accurately, smoothly, and to be honest with yourself regarding the goal (due diligence).

The first three videos lessons take you through a lesson on each individual position of the three scales, with the last video showing to the objective of playing all three together to complete the exercise.

Work through each one individually until you can do it in your sleep, as once we tie them together you'll realize you need to get to where you can do each one in your sleep

Hope it helps someone!

Introduction: Shows you the objective of the exercise
Introduction: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JP8QoITRhbY



Exercise 1: Shows the "open position" G scale
Exercise 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkW9fogXxBw



Exercise 2: Shows the "one finger per fret" G scale
Exercise 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MweukKjt5W8



Exercise 3: Shows the "three note per string" G scale
Exercise 3: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ISnwWYLvUQ



Exercise 4: Shows all three positions played from one to the other and then back down to start over again.
Exercise 4: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GLgcbNCF-M8

#2
Picking Accuracy Part 2: Crosspicking, managing exercises


PLAY THIS TO A METRONOME!!!

This is to help you with crosspicking non-linear lines.


Exercise 1:

E------------------|------------------|--------------------|---------------------|
B------------------|------------------|--------------------|---------------------|
G--------------6-6-|--------------8-8-|--------------11-11-|---------------13-13-|
D----------4-4-----|----------6-6-----|----------9-9-------|---------11-11-------|
A------2-2---------|------4-4---------|------7-7-----------|-----9-9-------------|
E--0-0-------------|--0-0-------------|--0-0---------------|-0-0-----------------|


The biggest huddle you might run into is getting from the G string back down to the low E string in time to start the next form. There's no reason the other notes should suffer speed wise. To help you through it, you can play a single note in the G string to give yourself a little extra time getting your pick from the G string down to the low string:


Exercise 2:

E----------------|----------------|-----------------|------------------|
B----------------|----------------|-----------------|------------------|
G--------------6-|--------------8-|--------------11-|---------------13-|
D----------4-4---|----------6-6---|----------9-9----|---------11-11----|
A------2-2-------|------4-4-------|------7-7--------|-----9-9----------|
E--0-0-----------|--0-0-----------|--0-0------------|-0-0--------------|


The lesson may also serve as an exercise in keeping your fretting hand stretched out for long periods of time also.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nmkQhTJcr8U
#3
Picking Accuracy Part 3: String Skipping, and waking up the picking hand

PLAY THIS TO A METRONOME!!!

This is a very simple exercise that's guaranteed to kick your butt.

Hold an open G chord and pick nothing but the G notes using strict alternate picking (Down Up Down Up...).

DO NOT MUTE ANY STRING as it will keep your playing honest...if you miss one of the G notes you'll hear the other open strings ringing helping you know you need to slow it down more and work on your accuracy.

Exercise 1 (playing four 16th notes per string):

E--[3]-------------------3-3-3-3----------
B--[0]------------------------------------
G--[0]-----------0-0-0-0---------0-0-0-0--
D--[0]------------------------------------
A--[2]------------------------------------
E--[3]--3-3-3-3--------------------------- repeat

Exercise 2 (playing two 16th notes per string):

E--[3]-----------3-3------
B--[0]--------------------
G--[0]------0-0------0-0--
D--[0]--------------------
A--[2]--------------------
E--[3]--3-3--------------- repeat

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F-j1lViRA9I
#4
Picking Accuracy Part 4: Pick Control and Skating on the Fretboard

This is a faster lick but takes a ton of accuracy with both hands before you get any speed behind it.

PLAY THIS TO A METRONOME!!!

This uses strict alternate picking. It doesn't really have a picking pattern as far as groups of notes you play on a string except that everything is kind of a group two. You play two notes, move the left hand either along a string or across to the next string, then play two more notes. From the tab you'll see that there really no rhyhm or reason as far as a pattern goes...except to use a solid and light picking touch through out (don't dig too deep into the string with the pick, it'll hang you up).

This is the first lesson where your fretting hand needs to wake up. You need a nice light touch but still need the notes to sound full and last for their full duration.

This is a great way to exploit all the stock and complex fingerings/patterns/positions you learn for the scales within the Major Scale.

This breaks up some of the patterns of an A Major scale out across the fretboard by chopping everything up into two note group.

A Major scale

E---7--9--5--7--4--5--2--4-----------------------------------------------------------------------
B---------------------------7--5--3--5--2--3-----------------------------------------------------
G---------------------------------------------4--6--2--4--1--2-----------------------------------
D---------------------------------------------------------------4--6--2--4-----------------------
A---------------------------------------------------------------------------5--7--4--5--2--4--0--
E------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


It's played in straight 16th notes with strict alternate picking. It's very easy at a slow pace but can take A LOT of practice to get it up to a decent speed.

You can use it as an exercise, as a new way to look at an old scale, as a practice routine if you play Celtic Music, and also to keep you up to speed for different Middle-Eastern runs.

Sorry I had to cut out at the end, had to take a call, and didn't feel like editing it out (told you my editing never got better)

http://youtube.com/watch?v=dtOke7NqO7I

#5
Picking Accuracy Part 5: Al Di Meola's Golden Suite Dawn, palm muting

PLAY THIS TO A METRONOME!!!

This is still my favorite Di Meola line on electric guitar.

It's a combination of open funk strumming and tight right and left hand muting. Again, the riff is strict alternate picking (after the pickup note at the beginning).

This one will force you to slow down, I'm SURE of it. It'll show you how accurate you are, and aren't.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a64QiMb1Vcc




(I notice I say "OK..." a lot in this vid...mmmkay)
#6
Only the last exercise was musical, why practise something that isn't musical when you can achieve the same result from something that is?
#8
Quote by griffRG7321
Only the last exercise was musical, why practise something that isn't musical when you can achieve the same result from something that is?


You said it...achieve.

You can think how you do but through manipulative practice you can teach your hands to over come almost anything. These will teach control. Control is VERY important when it comes to music.

And, through using a metronome you can learn how to bring things to full speed.
#10
Quote by MikeDodge
You said it...achieve.

You can think how you do but through manipulative practice you can teach your hands to over come almost anything. These will teach control. Control is VERY important when it comes to music.

And, through using a metronome you can learn how to bring things to full speed.


You can gain control by doing musical exercises too.

Seems pretty pointless to me.
#12
Quote by MikeDodge
Yeah, whatever.


I'm not trying to be disrespectful, kudos for actually taking the time to do a lesson and being willing to teach others, i just think there are better methods.
#14
The problem with online teaching today is that the "market" is completely flooded with lessons, with each one simply putting a new twist on the already overused concepts and exercises.

It's good that you've gone one step further than most by putting up videos, having a good tone and involving a song excerpt; but to make any sort of impact you need something more in my opinion.


And I apologise for picking apart your otherwise well presented lesson, which you have obviously spent time on.
#15
I'd say part of the problem is trying to teach a room full of experts.

Everybody here already knows everything, so the more detailed you make your lesson..... the more it will get picked apart.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 18, 2010,
#16
Quote by MapOfYourHead
The problem with online teaching today is that the "market" is completely flooded with lessons, with each one simply putting a new twist on the already overused concepts and exercises.

And I apologise for picking apart your otherwise well presented lesson, which you have obviously spent time on.



Nah, that's only for the basic stuff, and while I agree with Griff I think these type of patterns still have their place, especially at the beginning. They're tailored to specific techniques, easy to figure out so you can focus on the technique, and you don't have to rummage through pop tunes to find a specific bar that kinda works on it. Not that many people that play, especially on the bass for example, get to more technically demanding music so these help those people build their technique without really having to commit themselves to the more complex stuff.

After this step though, the "market" goes bare because it's really up to you to transcribe and figure your way into progress. That's where Griff's point comes in, learning a Charlie Parker tune like Donna Lee, analyzing each and every note and being able to properly solo on it will improve your playing tenfold.
#17
To recap:

#1 - The objective to develop the awareness and the control in your technique that allows you to play each line same the same regardless of position or whether it's a fretted note or a open string.

#2 - Takes you through a series of 6/9 chords helping you to play non-linear lines by crosspicking. Once you get this, loop it as this is directly out of E Lydian and makes a GREAT bed for practicing and recognizing Lydian. This is Steve Vai stuff.

#3 - I came up with this lesson by way of a Tal Farlow solo where he was doing large string skips. This is WAY harder than it looks and it VERY worth your time to if you're up for the challenge.

#4 - This is straight out of a Ravi Shankar tune.

#5 - You'll never get to this level without practicing the other stuff, and things like it.

To say these aren't musical means someone has been listening. Most of them are from tunes, or derived from them.

All in all you're not alone if you need to work on your accuracy. I've been play seriously for over 30 years now and still challenge myself to do new things each day, and grow as a player and musician. I always kills me how people can even mention Coltrane and not direct people to work out mechanics and kinks that's beyond a song is naive...or they forget how much time they spent on it. They also forget how much Coltrane did it.

There are few great players that didn't spent time putting themselves in challenging positions through exercises that developed them into the players they are today...I guess some just complete forget that aspect...or they never did their due diligence and called it good.
#18
Nice one on taking the timeout to do this Mike... I'm sure there will be others who can get something out of it... Perhaps ask freetheirishpower if he would move it to the techniques section for you.

Picking is a landmine for some... so decent exercises man

PS: Griff is just miffed out cos you didn't include a Malmsteen/Vinnie Moore thing... I know... Give him a Frank Gambale lick...

One day we can get someone brave enough to do a Jeff Beck lesson... string dynamics control/bar control for multiple melodies on one note/awesome rhythm/bitchiness of the english way/mastering the volume knob without being a knob

Nice one though mike... forget the haters... hehehehe
#19
Quote by evolucian
Nice one on taking the timeout to do this Mike... I'm sure there will be others who can get something out of it... Perhaps ask freetheirishpower if he would move it to the techniques section for you.

Picking is a landmine for some... so decent exercises man

PS: Griff is just miffed out cos you didn't include a Malmsteen/Vinnie Moore thing... I know... Give him a Frank Gambale lick...

One day we can get someone brave enough to do a Jeff Beck lesson... string dynamics control/bar control for multiple melodies on one note/awesome rhythm/bitchiness of the english way/mastering the volume knob without being a knob

Nice one though mike... forget the haters... hehehehe


+ 1

maybe you could make an official UG lesson/article?

Im sure plenty of people would appreciate it.
shred is gaudy music
#20
Quote by griffRG7321
You can gain control by doing musical exercises too.

Seems pretty pointless to me.



WTF is a 'musical exercise' anyways. An Etude, a song, etc...or an exercise? I have PLENTY of music stuff shown at http://youtube.com/gennation or even heavier here: http://mikedodge.freeforums.org/one-off-lessons-and-concepts-f2.html?sid=3133633c426835f8a14af59c948ebfb0 or even more organized here: http://lessons.mikedodge.com/

Have at it, you have your choice of in depth looks at anything as basic as Nirvana to as extreme as John Mclaughlin. Transcriptions of Mclauaghlin, Tal Farlow, Pete Anderson, Miles Davis, and more I can't remember, in depth looks a Footprints, Softly as a Morning Sunrise, Autumn Leaves. Dude, really.

This series is on a SPECIFIC topic, Picking Accuracy. And it delivers. With these exercises you will definitely gain some serious mind over matter control on your hands as far as accuracy is concerned. Try it before you harp it.

I teach pro's, advanced, and intermediate ONLY. Trust me, even if you fall in these levels...this stuff helps.

The only basic thing I showed (from an advanced players view) is the G scale thing, but I clearly pointed out the objective of being aware of how your body normally function...without knowing it. The is nothing beginner about this exercise, except the patterns, the objective the end point...and people will have to work at it, and in the end it WILL make their picking and touch more accurate...

the position shouldn't rule you, YOU should rule the position.

By all means play these to a metronome!!!!

Gain control.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Jun 18, 2010,
#21
Quote by evolucian
Nice one on taking the timeout to do this Mike... I'm sure there will be others who can get something out of it... Perhaps ask freetheirishpower if he would move it to the techniques section for you.

Picking is a landmine for some... so decent exercises man

PS: Griff is just miffed out cos you didn't include a Malmsteen/Vinnie Moore thing... I know... Give him a Frank Gambale lick...

One day we can get someone brave enough to do a Jeff Beck lesson... string dynamics control/bar control for multiple melodies on one note/awesome rhythm/bitchiness of the english way/mastering the volume knob without being a knob

Nice one though mike... forget the haters... hehehehe


I was playing Malmsteen, MAB, and Vinnie Moore in the 80's when they were popular :P

I don't even remember the cats name in Guitar Player mag who first turned us onto all of those guys through his spotlight column. You couldn't even find records for those guys back in the day. They would send the GP mags with those flimsy plastic records for everyone to check out the next greatest thing. Now with the Internet and stuff like Transcribe, that stuff is a piece of cake.

Ahhhh, wait,,,,THAT'S what he means by "musical exercise'!!!!! I got it now. Holy shite, LOL!!!!

Backthem we knew they were ripping off classical exercises/songs back then but they sounded SWEET with distortion and stuff. But, they grew as old as the classical licks they were pulled from pretty quickly.

I still dig a Yngwie tune though, mainly off the first two major releases. As far as Vinnie, it seemed as though his hands were getting sore after a couple songs into an album so he never resonated with me except for more than a tune or two per album back then.
#22
Quote by MikeDodge
I was playing Malmsteen, MAB, and Vinnie Moore in the 80's when they were popular :P

I don't even remember the cats name in Guitar Player mag who first turned us onto all of those guys through his spotlight column. You couldn't even find records for those guys back in the day. They would send the GP mags with those flimsy plastic records for everyone to check out the next greatest thing. Now with the Internet and stuff like Transcribe, that stuff is a piece of cake.

Ahhhh, wait,,,,THAT'S what he means by "musical exercise'!!!!! I got it now. Holy shite, LOL!!!!

Backthem we knew they were ripping off classical exercises/songs back then but they sounded SWEET with distortion and stuff. But, they grew as old as the classical licks they were pulled from pretty quickly.

I still dig a Yngwie tune though, mainly off the first two major releases. As far as Vinnie, it seemed as though his hands were getting sore after a couple songs into an album so he never resonated with me except for more than a tune or two per album back then.

Lol... I remember them... they were called soundpages... hehe... even the lp crackle on such a flimsy vinyl. And of course they scratched real easy... not to mention getting bent rather quickly. I think it was Mike Varney himself or something who did the spotlight (I'll have a look later when i feel like getting dusty). I have the mag where Vinnie Moore was an upstart and being given a nice crit on his playing on the "tape" they had to send thru. And those were the days it was cool to say your influences were "van halen, beethoven and paganini". MAB is a tool though... its blasphemy to recall his name... you will be stoned for that at midday... prepare!

I'd say musical exercises could pertain to melody intensive exercises... combined with picking techs and others. But Munky had a good suggestion... perhaps you could follow up with something like that?
#23
Quote by evolucian
Lol... I remember them... they were called soundpages... hehe... even the lp crackle on such a flimsy vinyl. And of course they scratched real easy... not to mention getting bent rather quickly. I think it was Mike Varney himself or something who did the spotlight (I'll have a look later when i feel like getting dusty). I have the mag where Vinnie Moore was an upstart and being given a nice crit on his playing on the "tape" they had to send thru. And those were the days it was cool to say your influences were "van halen, beethoven and paganini". MAB is a tool though... its blasphemy to recall his name... you will be stoned for that at midday... prepare!

I'd say musical exercises could pertain to melody intensive exercises... combined with picking techs and others. But Munky had a good suggestion... perhaps you could follow up with something like that?


^ yeah I remember Mike Varneys spotlight and those soundpages records. I still have one somewhere. Its with Steve Morse demonstrating some speakers. Honestly I hated that stuff though and what came out of it.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 19, 2010,
#24
Yes, Mike Varney....Shrapnel Records.

He started the Spotlight column in GP again a couple of years ago. With the Internet now there's hardly any good players that go unnoticed.

Griif, sorry if my responses back were harsh. I didn't mean any disrespect. I was just feeling a little cocky I guess.
#25
Quote by MikeDodge


Griif, sorry if my responses back were harsh. I didn't mean any disrespect. I was just feeling a little cocky I guess.


It's all good man, looking back my comments were harsh too.
#26
aww sweet... now u guys can hold hands and stuff... its so nice to see people in love and making up after a fight... good for you two
#27
You're just angry still because i said MAB was better than Ritchie kotzen

..which he like totally is...
Last edited by griffRG7321 at Jun 21, 2010,
#28
For that you will be shot... a lot... and two more fore for insolence and 8 extra for blasphemy
#30
I need hair like that... I'll be a killer guitarist too with no taste in soloing... thats it... 2moro i get my mullet
#31
Quote by griffRG7321
You can kill me, but you'll never kill THE METAL



yeah, he can do that for himself.

Quote by griffRG7321
You're just angry still because i said MAB was better than Ritchie kotzen

..which he like totally is...

both of those guys are cheezers IMO.

Sorry that was wrong of me. a kneejerk reaction to cheeze. Those guys certainly are fast n stuff.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 21, 2010,
#33
Quote by evolucian
*carves a bullet for munky too*


LOL

Sorry. I really hate that era. It's so damn generic. The guitars, the hairstyles, the licks..... I dunno. IMO they define "lack of taste"/"cheezyness". I mean their metal/rock soloing chops are formidable, but I guess that alone doesn't do it for me.

Anyway, I usually try to keep that in, but I let it slip. Sorry.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 21, 2010,
#34
Quote by GuitarMunky
LOL

Sorry. I really hate that era. It's so damn generic. The guitars, the hairstyles, the licks..... I dunno. IMO they define "lack of taste"/"cheezyness". I mean their metal/rock soloing chops are formidable, but I guess that alone doesn't do it for me.

Anyway, I usually try to keep that in, but I let it slip. Sorry.


I love the 80s guitar sound, vinnie moore, early malmsteen and early satch etc.

MAB and all those neoclassical throw backs i cant stand though.
#35
But Kotzen doesn't even have that vibe... lol... i no understand... no englais
#36
Quote by griffRG7321
I love the 80s guitar sound, vinnie moore, early malmsteen and early satch etc.

MAB and all those neoclassical throw backs i cant stand though.


Well I do dig Vinnie moores tone and playing as well as Malmsteen and Satch. When you look at the whole lot of that movement though you realize that most of these guys have only 1 thing to say....... "check me out, I'm the next guitar god". Thats what their selling. Im more into hearing a person express "im a human being .... this comes from ME".

Quote by evolucian
But Kotzen doesn't even have that vibe... lol... i no understand... no englais


LOL he's like the epitome of it.



more of the late 80's "im really awesome" gang...






But you know I the real reason I hate this stuff is cause Im jealous. (to pre-empt the obvious rebuttal from shred fans)


LOL anyway, I hate poseurs regardless of their soloing abilities.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 21, 2010,
#37
Quote by GuitarMunky
Well I do dig Vinnie moores tone and playing as well as Malmsteen and Satch. When you look at the whole lot of that movement though you realize that most of these guys have only 1 thing to say....... "check me out, I'm the next guitar god". Thats what their selling. Im more into hearing a person express "im a human being .... this come from ME".


Wait, you just blew my mind

I didn't know guitards could be illuminated with reason and feeling

I guess it's time to hide now huh? hahaha
#38
He was 19... lol... 19!!! thats griff's age... he aint 19 anymore... and his music is awesome now. Wasn't bad then either... just he has awesome grooves... still carving that bullet... no escaping it dude, hehehe

I bet you griff has a mullet... (he's english and they think stuff is cool... like shoulder pads)

pillo... u a bassist... hush now... the grown ups are speaking... hehehehe
Last edited by evolucian at Jun 21, 2010,
#40
average length = mullet ... shame man... no wonder u like mab so much... but then again... all three of us like beck and he's mullet king... dammit
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