#1
I play predominantly metal (not much else, actually) but I want to be able to play cleaner, acoustic stuff (when I actually get an acoustic).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ddn4MGaS3N4

That's the sort of thing I want to be able to play, but without the wrong way round hand and less tapping.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsD6uEZsIsU

That too.


I want any suggestions at all that can start me off in learning this sort of thing.

Bear in mind I don't have a capo, and I have never played much of this style before.

Thanks!

(Any questions, just ask)
You're = You are
Your = Belongs to you

There = Not here
Their = Belongs to them
They're = They are
Thx.

Quote by Tim the Rocker
Good grammar is like sex. It feels good.
#3
I don't want to play just those songs. I want to begin learning stuff that will help me play stuff that are similar to those songs, in sound or genre in general. Any idea where to begin? Easy songs? Obviously not too easy - I've been playing for nearly 2 years. I'm not sure how to show how good I am because I play completely different stuff to what I want to learn, but I can play a lot of trivium songs and master of puppets all the way through with ease.

Thanks.
You're = You are
Your = Belongs to you

There = Not here
Their = Belongs to them
They're = They are
Thx.

Quote by Tim the Rocker
Good grammar is like sex. It feels good.
#4
Theory is universal, but technique-wise, electric and acoustic are in many ways two completely different instruments. "Master of Puppets" is not going to help you here.

If all you've ever played is metal, I'd say the best thing you can do to learn acoustic is go right back to the beginning. Start with "Horse With No Name" and work your way up. Learn the open chords, practice your rhythm, work on fingerpicking, etc. A bit of jazz or blues never hurts, and will give you a lot of practice with technique (and not just that sweeping and tapping nonsense).

How will all this help you learn that whole percussive style? Frankly, I don't have the slightest clue, since I've never gone in for all that flashy stuff. I'd imagine it just takes a lot of practice and experimentation, and a great deal of familiarity with your particular instrument. You'll almost certainly need the acoustic before you get to that level, since I don't imagine you can do percussive body tapping very well on a wooden slab.