#1
How long did it take you to learn how to sight read fairly fluently? I am just now learning treble clef, and how do you think I'll be if I consistently do 1 hour every day this summer? Obviously it varies from person to person, but I am taking AP Music Theory in the fall. I already know a decent bit of theory, just not so much with actually reading sheet music.
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#2
It's really not that hard. Sight reading at a high level normally takes years for people to perfect, but if you just mean getting where you recognize the notes, it shouldn't take that long. For piano, I was able to learn treble clef pretty fluently in under a month. Now I wasn't great at sight reading on piano, cause I was starting the instrument at the same time I was learning the clef, but I could name all the notes on the staff and knew where to play if I saw the note.

What helps a lot is just going through and looking at a staff and naming the notes as quick as you can, especially helps for music theory since you need to know the notes well, not just where they are the instrument.
Last edited by Warrior47 at Jun 18, 2010,
#3
Quote by Warrior47
It's really not that hard. Sight reading at a high level normally takes years for people to perfect, but if you just mean getting where you recognize the notes, it shouldn't take that long. For piano, I was able to learn treble clef in under a month. Now I wasn't great at it, but I could name all the notes on the staff and knew where to play if I saw the note.

What helps a lot is just going through and looking at a staff and naming the notes as quick as you can, especially helps for music theory since you need to know the notes well, not just where they are the instrument.



Yeah I'm learning it as music, not just as guitar. Of course, as a guitarist, I'll be applying my sight reading to guitar. I can name the notes as of now, but by the end of summer, I wanna be able to see a note and know what it is, and play it, as if someone tells me to play the 7th fret on the A string. No thought required.
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#4
Definitely practice sight reading rhythms. There are only 12 notes in Western music, most people can recognize and play notes fairly easily, however rhythms are vary quite a bit.

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#5
Quote by gatechballer
How long did it take you to learn how to sight read fairly fluently? I am just now learning treble clef, and how do you think I'll be if I consistently do 1 hour every day this summer? Obviously it varies from person to person, but I am taking AP Music Theory in the fall. I already know a decent bit of theory, just not so much with actually reading sheet music.


You're doing the right thing by getting focusing on this now. Just keep at it. You should be in good shape by the fall. Plus you'll get even better in class by doing your theory assignments.


Quote by gatechballer
Yeah I'm learning it as music, not just as guitar. Of course, as a guitarist, I'll be applying my sight reading to guitar. I can name the notes as of now, but by the end of summer, I wanna be able to see a note and know what it is, and play it, as if someone tells me to play the 7th fret on the A string. No thought required.

Well reading at that level takes years. Developing the skills to proficiently sight read music in all positions of the guitar over a couple of months, is not a realistic goal.

You don't have to be on that level though for your theory class. Just keep at it, and don't worry about it.

on a side note.....some piano skills would also be helpful. Pianists have a huge advantage in theory class since the examples are mostly presented in a context they are familiar with.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 18, 2010,
#6
in order to sight-read, it's not enough to know what the notes are. you have to develop what's called tactile sensitivity - suffice it to say this means that you can play any note anywhere on your instrument without looking at it. for classical guitar, this is actually fairly easy to develop - for electric guitar, slightly harder, since there's a lot of playing done in the higher register where spacing between frets is minimal and easy to misjudge.

for piano, once you have tactile sensitivity, sight-reading just becomes a matter of having good rhythm and looking a bar or two ahead of what you're actually playing.
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#7
you'll be fine if you work on it as you say you will.
Id also buy a book called musical examples for sight singing by ottman and learn solfege and how to sight sing, as that will help immensly and is required in AP theory.