#1
Hey Everyone,

As some of you may know, I'm a huge fan of weird and wonderful instruments, and tonight, I think I've ordered a great addition to my collection- a tenor guitar.

http://www.highlystrung.co.uk/acatalog/oz-3372.jpg <<<My new arrival

If you've never heard of them, they were invented to replace the tenor banjo in jazz bands, as more and more bands turned to using guitars. The "standard tuning" is the same as a tenor banjo (CGda), so that the players could introduce a guitar sound to the band without having to learn a new instrument.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenor_guitar <<<For more comprehensive reading

The reason I bought it is because although it still holds a place in jazz, it is somewhat of a jack of all trades, as it seems to take on the guise of almost any 4 stringed instrument.

A simple search on youtube concluded a vast array of tunings to experiment with, as you can just fit string gauges to taste, to take on the role of a mandolin (gdae, gdad or even gdgd), a ukulele (gcea or dgbe), the first 4 strings on a guitar (eadg, not to mention access to simplified open tunings as well.

So, if anyone has any stories or expirience with tenor guitars, it'd be great to share knowledge with more expirienced players, for example, favourite songs, artists or tunings would be a great start.

Happy Pickin'

Bryn

xx
#2
That's awesome. I've heard of them, but didn't know anyone still played them.

Is it a new model or vintage?
#3
Quote by obeythepenguin
That's awesome. I've heard of them, but didn't know anyone still played them.

Is it a new model or vintage?



as far as i know, its a standard production model by ozark. but the majority of players i've seen are using real vintage pieces, by gibson, selmar, harmony etc.

another thing i forgot to add, they can be used for either accompaniament chord work (by such artists as seth lakeman) and also, for single note, lead work (stemming from mandolin/fiddle tuning).

i really can't wait to have a play around with mine, when it gets here...
#4
We cigar-box guitar builders make a lot of instruments that qualify as tenor guitars. 4-string builds are very popular, and a tenor-length neck goes well with the smaller box-bodies of these instruments.
We have a tenor group on CigarBoxNation.
#5
Quote by Bikewer
We cigar-box guitar builders make a lot of instruments that qualify as tenor guitars. 4-string builds are very popular, and a tenor-length neck goes well with the smaller box-bodies of these instruments.
We have a tenor group on CigarBoxNation.


Oh wow, what tunings do you favour with those, then?

i found out that the tenor that i should be receiving either this week or next, is set up for open G, which i don't particularly want to use right away, so i'm hopefully getting a set of elixir nano's (my favourite strings) to find some nice, sensible gauges for GDAE (a tuning im familiar with), which i think will be .012, .020, .030and .040 so about the same as an octave mandolin, to set me off.
#6
Here's the informative Wiki article on the tenor:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tenor_guitar

As you can see, there's a wide variety of tunings in use. Easiest would simply be to tune to the top four strings of standard guitar tuning... But plenty of experimentation is possible.
#7
I started hankering for a tenor guitar after playing around with a ukulele. I found that a four-stringed instrument allows for some interesting/fun/easy open chord shapes. Unfortunately, they are pretty hard to find. There was a beautiful vintage gibson tenor for sale in one of the local second hand shops, but it was pretty pricey and I couldn't justify spending the money. In retrospect, I was an idiot and should have bought it...

Anyway, the only new tenor in my local area is a blueridge model...

http://acousticcentre.com.au/uploadedFiles/1256165178156-1797.jpg

No idea whether they are any good.