#1
hey guys i'm trying to learn as much about music as possible it seems anymore and and i was looking back at what i know and i know nothing about rythm and timing. so i was just came here to post asking what are the music terms for these such things? like i'm not exactly sure what i want to read up on when it comes to this stuff. also, what exactly is a triplet? i looked up a quick definition and it said " Music A group of three notes having the time value of two notes of the same kind. Also called tercet."
can some one explain this in maybe a simpler way?
#2
it would be like a triplet of crochets being equal in time to a minim (2 crochets)
#3
usually used with eight notes... they are three in one group and little threes are written over them, you pick three notes in one beat...

one-trip-let two-trip-let three-trip-let four-trip-let

hope, that this helps
#4
Quote by schism8
hey guys i'm trying to learn as much about music as possible it seems anymore and and i was looking back at what i know and i know nothing about rythm and timing. so i was just came here to post asking what are the music terms for these such things? like i'm not exactly sure what i want to read up on when it comes to this stuff. also, what exactly is a triplet? i looked up a quick definition and it said " Music A group of three notes having the time value of two notes of the same kind. Also called tercet."
can some one explain this in maybe a simpler way?


That's a pretty good definition of a triplet. Basically, you divide one beat into three notes. The cadence is "one and a two and a three and a four" in 4/4 time. Iron Maiden is a great band to listen to for an example of triplets, particularly in main riff of "The Trooper" or in the bass intro to "Stranger in a Strange Land". Triplets have a galloping kind of feel or sound to them.
Last edited by stoic at Jun 18, 2010,
#5
That looks like a good definition of a triplet, I simply recommend learning to read music though.

triplets

O----O Lets say those are 2 eight notes in 4/4

O-O-O that is an eighth note triplet, playing 3 equally time-spaced notes in the time it took to play those 2
Tick tock and waiting for the meteor
This clock is opening another door
#6
Quote by rorywal
it would be like a triplet of crochets being equal in time to a minim (2 crochets)


this.

unless you're from america, in which case it's like a triplet of quarter notes being equal in time to a half note.

if you're still confused, look up what's called borrowed rhythms.

Quote by stoic
Iron Maiden is a great band to listen to for an example of triplets, particularly in main riff of "The Trooper" or in the bass intro to "Stranger in a Strange Land". Triplets have a galloping kind of feel or sound to them.


you're thinking of gallops. a gallop is two sixteenth notes and an eighth note.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
Last edited by AeolianWolf at Jun 18, 2010,
#8
Quote by stoic
That's a pretty good definition of a triplet. Basically, you divide one beat into three notes. The cadence is "one and a two and a three and a four" in 4/4 time. Iron Maiden is a great band to listen to for an example of triplets, particularly in main riff of "The Trooper" or in the bass intro to "Stranger in a Strange Land". Triplets have a galloping kind of feel or sound to them.


Those are gallops, not triplets, as Aeolian said.

A better example would be Battery by Metallica. When the thrash part comes in, those are triplets.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#9
Quote by rockingamer2
Those are gallops, not triplets, as Aeolian said.

A better example would be Battery by Metallica. When the thrash part comes in, those are triplets.


...those are also gallops.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#10
Quote by AeolianWolf
...those are also gallops.


at me.

I listened to it and realized they were gallops. My bad.
^^The above is a Cryptic Metaphor^^


"To know the truth of history is to realize its ultimate myth and its inevitable ambiguity." Everything is made up and the facts don't matter.


MUSIC THEORY LINK
#11
Your beginning questions are very vague so I'll just answer your question about triplets (with a bit of an introduction to rhythms and what not):

Say you have a song in 4/4 (common time signature, four beats).

Outlining it will look a bit like this:
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a

Each number is a down-beat (hence the four beats), each + is an upbeat, and the "e"s and "a"s are just a further subdivision (sixteenth notes to be specific).

A quarter note (in 4/4) takes up one beat. Four quarter notes will look a bit like this:
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x       x       x       x
Eight eighth notes will look like this:
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x   x   x   x   x   x   x   x
Finally, sixteen sixteenth notes will look like this:
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
I hope this makes sense.

Ok, now to explain what triplets are:

You have two basic subdivisions of beats, dividing them in multiples of twos (duplets) and in multiples of three (triplets). The term "duplets" isn't used as often as the term "triplets" because usually when duplets are used they aren't tuplets, in other words, they are the standard subdivision of the beats, rather than an "artificial" division. That Wikipedia link explains some stuff pretty well.

Basically, time signatures like 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 5/4, and some other more complex ones use duplets as their natural subdivision, whereas 6/8, 9/8, 12/8 and some others (usually) use triplets as their natural subdivision. I won't really explain why at the moment but you should start to understand once I start to explain other things.

I don't know if you know how time signatures work, so I'll explain those real quick. Basically the first number represents the number of beats in a measure and the second number represents what type of note is one beat. 4/4 contains four quarter notes, 3/4 contains three quarter notes, 7/8 contains seven eighth notes, etc. Pretty basic concept once you are introduced to it.

So, to explain how triplets work as tuplets (in other words, in a duplet time signature like 4/4), I'll use a bit of an analogy:

Take a piece of paper. This piece of paper will represent one beat (we'll consider it a quarter note as in a /4 time signature such as 4/4). To create two eighth notes, we'll fold this paper in half (then unfold it so the crease represents the division). This is a "natural" or "rational" subdivision because of the key signature.
So, now that it's divided into a natural subdivision, unfold it (if it wasn't already) and fold it into three equal parts (like a brochure). Unfold it and examine the creases. See how they don't line up with the eighth notes? This is because they are tuplets, or irrational subdivisions (more specifically, eighth note triplets).

Lining those up against "regular" eighth notes, it looks like this:
1  e  +  a  2  e  +  a  3  e  +  a  4  e  +  a
x     x     x     x     x     x     x     x
x   x   x   x   x   x   x   x   x   x   x   x
I think that's it. I hope that makes a bit of sense now. If you have any further questions, feel free to PM me, but I'm sure they'll get answered here if you post them, so it's whatever.

Edit: Wow, a lot of responses while I was typing that
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 18, 2010,
#12
Quote by food1010

Basically, time signatures like 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 5/4, and some other more complex ones use duplets as their natural subdivision, whereas 6/8, 9/8, 12/8 and some others (usually) use triplets as their natural subdivision. I won't really explain why at the moment but you should start to understand once I start to explain other things.

I'm not sure if I've misunderstood you or not but...

6/8 and 9/8 etc often sound like they're made up of triplets, but are actually made up of quavers/8th notes. In 9/8 for example, if you had a rhythm that went like 1 & a 2 & a 3 & a 1... those aren't triplets.
#13
Quote by Declan87
6/8 and 9/8 etc often sound like they're made up of triplets, but are actually made up of quavers/8th notes. In 9/8 for example, if you had a rhythm that went like 1 & a 2 & a 3 & a 1... those aren't triplets.


well, that's because they ARE made of up triplets. only they're not called triplets, because they're not borrowed. basically, you're right, they're not triplets, because they're not notated like triplets. but when you put triplets in a duple/quadruple meter setting (i.e. 4/4), that's where the notes are taken from - a time signature like 6/8 or 9/8, where there are three eighth notes/quavers per beat.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#14
Quote by AeolianWolf
well, that's because they ARE made of up triplets. only they're not called triplets, because they're not borrowed. basically, you're right, they're not triplets, because they're not notated like triplets. but when you put triplets in a duple/quadruple meter setting (i.e. 4/4), that's where the notes are taken from - a time signature like 6/8 or 9/8, where there are three eighth notes/quavers per beat.
Exactly.



This image is from Wikipedia, it shows an example of triplets in 6/8 where they are not notated as tuplets because they are natural divisions rather than artificial/irregular. It also shows how duplets/quadruplets would be considered/notated as tuplets because they are irregular to the time signature.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
Last edited by food1010 at Jun 18, 2010,