#1
I've been playing guitar for like 3 years now, but im a total noob when it comes to Heads and cabs. All i know is that if the OHMS match, than it will work, but im not even 100% on if that is true. is it? And also is there like an output in the head that u plug into the cabinet to "connect" them or what? Again, sorry for the noob question. But yeah can someone answer my questions?
Last edited by AC/DCfan1616 at Jun 18, 2010,
#2
normally on a head you will have 3 out puts 4,8 and 16 ohms, on some amps it is operated by a switch whilst most of the time it is 3 jacks which are conected to the cab. when getting a cab it needs to be rated for a level of resistance that is the same as the output of your amp, and also the speakers need to be rated to take more watts than you amp produces
#3
1. Output. You need a cab whose power handling exceeds the power output of the amplifier. For example, if the amp is 50 W, then you would want a 100 W cabinet.

2. Every amplifier can output at a certain impedance, or range of impedances. This might be 4 ohms, 8 ohms or 16 ohms. You need to get a cabinet that has the same impedance as the amplifier can output.

3. There will be one or more outputs on the back of the head called something like 'External Speaker' - you get a speaker cable (not a guitar cable) and plug it into one of these outputs. Then, plug it into the matching impedance input on the cabinet.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#4
There will usually be several outputs depending on the head, or a switch to output at a certain ohm rating. Find out what ohms your cab is running at, which is usually pretty easy since most manufacturers list it by the inputs, choose the according output ohms on amp and hook up with a speaker cable.
#6
Quote by AC/DCfan1616
thanks guys this really helped

That's what we're here for.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#7
Quote by seemeel
That's what we're here for.

So as long as the OHMS match, no matter what brand, it will work.
#8
Quote by AC/DCfan1616
So as long as the OHMS match, no matter what brand, it will work.

yep and the speaker are rated more than the power rating of the head. most people just get the heads matching cab for the simplicity of it being compatible, and others for the look of it, you can mix and match your head and cab
#9
Ok so just to make sure would this head work with this cab?
head:http://www.guitarcenter.com/Blackheart-BH15H-Handsome-Devil-Series-15W-Tube-Head-483096-i1400399.gc

Cab: http://www.guitarcenter.com/Blackheart-BH412-Guitar-Extension-Cabinet-608006-i1445248.gc


I think it would since in both descriptions 16 OHMS are mentioned... :P just makin sure
Last edited by AC/DCfan1616 at Jun 18, 2010,
#10
Quote by AC/DCfan1616
I've been playing guitar for like 3 years now, but im a total noob when it comes to Heads and cabs. All i know is that if the OHMS match, than it will work, but im not even 100% on if that is true. is it? And also is there like an output in the head that u plug into the cabinet to "connect" them or what? Again, sorry for the noob question. But yeah can someone answer my questions?


the truth is impedance is variable by nature, the ratings for impedance have little to do with actual impedance curves and the math used to derive impedance ratings does not directly correlate to much of anything.

if you know about that stuff then you can get a bit trig with it and do your own calculations based on impedance response of a speaker. if you don't, then just match impedances.

there is an absolutely great answer to impedance mismatch on this FAQ, very technical though

http://www.webervst.com/sptalk.html

do a 'find' for 'impedance mismatch' to find it.
punk isn't dead, it's always smelled that way.

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