#1
So basically ive been getting stuck in a rutt lately with my song writing and thought that a change of scenery would be nice. I usually try and add to my lead playing but i think this time i need to learn some new chords. Ive been using power chords all be it very helpful and work well with the music im writing but maybe the added few clean chords thrown in for an intro or chorus might spice things up a bit
#2
Major seventh, minor seventh, dominant 7, diminished, other extended chords like 9ths or 11ths can sound nice, 6 chords and 2 chords. Extensions often sound the smoothest with other extended chords.

Start off with the 7th chords (assuming you know major/minor already. If not learn those)

(Honestly I just make up chords half the time and figure out what they are later )

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Jun 19, 2010,
#3
I like doing stuff like this:
Note the tunings otherwise it'll sound like shit.

e-5-|
B-6-|
G-5-|
D-7-|
A-5-|
D-8-|


Or this:

e-3-3-3-|
C-0-0-0-|
G-4-4-4-|
D-3-5---|
A-----0-|
F-------|



e-13-|
B-13-|
G-9--|
D-10-|
A-8--|
D-8--|
#4
I like Major 7ths... like Cmaj7... or even a minor/major 7, like the second chord of Stairway to Heaven. Or Em9.

|-0--0--0
|-0--1--0
|-0--1--0
|-2--2--4
|-3--0--2
|-3--x--0
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#5
I really like sus chords. Try throwing in a sus2 in place of a power chord at the end of a progression.
#6
Quote by Disturbed_EMG
I like doing stuff like this:
Note the tunings otherwise it'll sound like shit.

e-5-|
B-6-|
G-5-|
D-7-|
A-5-|
D-8-|


Or this:

e-3-3-3-|
C-0-0-0-|
G-4-4-4-|
D-3-5---|
A-----0-|
F-------|



e-13-|
B-13-|
G-9--|
D-10-|
A-8--|
D-8--|



Those are cool, especially if you want to learn to play in a new tuning. But kind of a pain. Try to figure out those chords in a standard tuning.

And note pad >/ guitar pro. Finale is however.
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#7
Quote by Disturbed_EMG
I like doing stuff like this:
Note the tunings otherwise it'll sound like shit.

e-5-|
B-6-|
G-5-|
D-7-|
A-5-|
D-8-|


Or this:

e-3-3-3-|
C-0-0-0-|
G-4-4-4-|
D-3-5---|
A-----0-|
F-------|



e-13-|
B-13-|
G-9--|
D-10-|
A-8--|
D-8--|


These are really nice chords, i tend to use Drop D 99% of the time so this was really Helpful
#8
Quote by FacetOfChaos
Major seventh, minor seventh, dominant 7, diminished, other extended chords like 9ths or 11ths can sound nice, 6 chords and 2 chords. Extensions often sound the smoothest with other extended chords.

Start off with the 7th chords (assuming you know major/minor already. If not learn those)

(Honestly I just make up chords half the time and figure out what they are later )

http://www.all-guitar-chords.com/


Haha ill give them a try I take it by Minor 7th its your basic Minor chord but you add the seventh note of the scale yes?
#9
Quote by alphablade7
Haha ill give them a try I take it by Minor 7th its your basic Minor chord but you add the seventh note of the scale yes?

Here's how they work:

Maj7 - 1,3,5,7
Min7 - 1,b3,5,b7
7 - 1,3,5,b7 (also called dominant 7th)
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#10
Quote by alphablade7
Haha ill give them a try I take it by Minor 7th its your basic Minor chord but you add the seventh note of the scale yes?

Well, 7th note from the root of the chord really.

So D minor 7, which is diatonically in the key of C, would go

D F A C

1 b3 5 b7

Where as D major 7 is

D F# A C#

1 3 5 7

The b3 and b7 in minor 7 refer to the key of D major, which has F and C sharps.

Chord construction is based on intervals and if you have the motivation you should learn about how it's done.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
Who's going to stop you? The music police?
Last edited by FacetOfChaos at Jun 19, 2010,
#11
Quote by hockeyplayer168
Here's how they work:

Maj7 - 1,3,5,7
Min7 - 1,b3,5,b7
7 - 1,3,5,b7 (also called dominant 7th)


NO, the dominant is the 5th degree of the root - If you're playing in C, the dominant is G. What you have called a 'dominant 7th' is in fact just called a '7th', neither major nor minor.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#12
Quote by seemeel
NO, the dominant is the 5th degree of the root - If you're playing in C, the dominant is G. What you have called a 'dominant 7th' is in fact just called a '7th', neither major nor minor.


Unless I'm mistaken, hockeyplayer is right. A dominant 7th chord is a minor seventh interval put on top of a major triad, which is "spelled" as 1 3 5 b7. It is also often just called a 7th chord as hockeyplayer said, and it is technically a major chord, as the interval between the 1st and 3rd is a major third.

Although, you're right in the fact that the dominant degree of a scale is the fifth. However, we're talking about chords here, not the names of degrees of scales.
#13
Quote by seemeel
NO, the dominant is the 5th degree of the root - If you're playing in C, the dominant is G. What you have called a 'dominant 7th' is in fact just called a '7th', neither major nor minor.

YES. It is a seventh chord built off the dominant tone of the major scale.
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#14
Quote by seemeel
NO, the dominant is the 5th degree of the root - If you're playing in C, the dominant is G. What you have called a 'dominant 7th' is in fact just called a '7th', neither major nor minor.


The chord's general name is ''major minor seventh chord''. This term serves the best because it eliminates any doubts about what it is. It has a disadvantage of being long though.

Also, it is often referred to as dominant seventh chord since it's the seventh chord that naturally occurs on the dominant of the major scale. But some theoreticians oppose to this term when applied to a major minor seventh chord occurring elsewhere (in chromatic harmony). But it's widely used and doesn't cause much troubles.

Another vernacular I've noticed is the one you mention - ''seventh chord''. But technically any chord that contains some seventh is a seventh chord, so for many people, including me, it would come naturally to ask ''what seventh chord?''. In C, they would include C7M, Cm7, Cm7M, Cm7/5-, Cdim7, C7M/5-, Cm7M/5-, C7/5-, C7M/5+, Cm7M/5+, C7/5+, Cm7/5+....
#15
Quote by Slayertplsko
The chord's general name is ''major minor seventh chord''. This term serves the best because it eliminates any doubts about what it is. It has a disadvantage of being long though.

Also, it is often referred to as dominant seventh chord since it's the seventh chord that naturally occurs on the dominant of the major scale. But some theoreticians oppose to this term when applied to a major minor seventh chord occurring elsewhere (in chromatic harmony). But it's widely used and doesn't cause much troubles.

Another vernacular I've noticed is the one you mention - ''seventh chord''. But technically any chord that contains some seventh is a seventh chord, so for many people, including me, it would come naturally to ask ''what seventh chord?''. In C, they would include C7M, Cm7, Cm7M, Cm7/5-, Cdim7, C7M/5-, Cm7M/5-, C7/5-, C7M/5+, Cm7M/5+, C7/5+, Cm7/5+....

way way way too picky
Oh yeah.

Quote by hildesaw
A minor is the saddest of all keys.

EDIT: D minor is the saddest of all keys.
#16
Quote by Slayertplsko
Another vernacular I've noticed is the one you mention - ''seventh chord''. But technically any chord that contains some seventh is a seventh chord, so for many people, including me, it would come naturally to ask ''what seventh chord?''. In C, they would include C7M, Cm7, Cm7M, Cm7/5-, Cdim7, C7M/5-, Cm7M/5-, C7/5-, C7M/5+, Cm7M/5+, C7/5+, Cm7/5+....
But if I were to say "D seven" would you have any doubt what type of seventh chord I am talking about? I think that's the point he was making, that you can pronounce "D7" as the characters appear in the name. I don't think he meant to say that "a seventh chord" is specific enough to describe "a dominant seventh chord."
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#17
If you want it to sound REALLY interesting, take those 7th chords mentioned above and add in some tensions. For example, a Maj7(#11) sounds very nice - but keep the #11 at the top of the chord.

Also, try altering the chords or finding inversions so that you have some min2 and tritone intervals, as these create the most tension. And then... don't resolve them!
#18
Here are some interesting voicings/chords I like to use to spice up my playing (in standard tuning).

maj7: x5463x

m7(11): 5x553x

m7(b6): x5856x

M6/5: 5544xx

maj7/3 : 2406xx

M(#4): 3404xx

M(9): 32023x