#1
I'm buying my first turntable and my stereo already has a built in preamp. Therefore, I want a turntable with a preamp I can turn off because I want to use my stereo's. Anyways, I found a decent looking turntable and it says it has a "switchable preamp". I'm not sure if this means I can turn it on and off or not. Help me out?

TL;DR - Can I turn this turntable's preamp off?

http://www.audio-technica.com/cms/turntables/9a7f42b88ee1e14b/index.html
#2
That's what it means.
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#3
Quote by Jackal58
That's what it means.


If you look at the PDF manual on there, it says something about switching between a phono preamp and a line level preamp. It doesn't mention just cutting off the preamp in general. Are you sure?
#4
Quote by Born Headless
If you look at the PDF manual on there, it says something about switching between a phono preamp and a line level preamp. It doesn't mention just cutting off the preamp in general. Are you sure?

Yep. The phono preamp output is a high impedance out that will match your amps phono input. The line level out put is for amps that don't have a phono input. It matches it to a cd, tape, dvd level input.
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#5
So you're saying, if I use the phono input, then I will be using my amp's preamp, not the record player's?

EDIT: I'm just trying to avoid A.) Using a sucky built-in preamp or B.) Having the signal go through 2 preamps and become distorted and start clipping... I just want to use my stereo's preamp, I could care less about the turntables preamp.
Last edited by Born Headless at Jun 19, 2010,
#6
Quote by Born Headless
So you're saying, if I use the phono input, then I will be using my amp's preamp, not the record player's?

EDIT: I'm just trying to avoid A.) Using a sucky built-in preamp or B.) Having the signal go through 2 preamps and become distorted and start clipping... I just want to use my stereo's preamp, I could care less about the turntables preamp.

The amp in the turntable is for impedance matching only. A lot of stereo amps no longer have phono level inputs. You'll be ok.
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#7
Oh man, this brings back memories.

In high school, I was DJ ScratchMasta Phat.
#8
Quote by Jackal58
The amp in the turntable is for impedance matching only. A lot of stereo amps no longer have phono level inputs. You'll be ok.


/bump... Can someone explain this to me?
#9
Bottom line the built in pre-amp is probably sonically superior to the turntable so I doubt it's going to make a huge difference which phono - pre you use. If you're lookng for audiophile sound you'd be better of with an older used table with an adjustable tone arm and a nice moving magnet cartridge.
#10
Quote by Born Headless
/bump... Can someone explain this to me?

Quote by wiki
A "phono input" is a set of RCA input jacks, usually behind a stereo receiver, to which a phonograph or turntable is attached. Modern phonograph needles (styli) and phono cartridges output a very low level signal, which is input to the receiver then amplified and equalized.

Phonograph recordings are made with high frequencies boosted. This reduces background noise, including clicks or pops, and also conserves the amount of physical space needed for each groove, by reducing the size of the larger low-frequency undulations. During playback the high frequencies are rescaled to their original level. This is accomplished in the amplifier with a phono input that incorporates standardized RIAA equalization circuitry.

While in the 1980s even some larger boombox radios had phono inputs, by 2006 mostly only very sophisticated and expensive stereo receivers retained the phono input, since most users were expected to use digital music formats such as CD or satellite radio. Some newer low-cost turntables include built-in amplifiers to produce line-level outputs; devices are available that perform this conversion for use with computers; and used amplifiers and receivers are often inexpensive. All DJ mixers have phono inputs as well.

Your typical rca line level out from a cd or tape is about 3vrms @ 50 ohms. A phonograph output is usually around 50mvrms @ around 10k ohms.
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