#2
There's adavntages and disadvantages to both. I personally don't know a ton about reacording, but I can help a little.

Direct Input
Pros: Easiest setup, Can change settings/effects even after it is recorded using software like ProTools (which is great I use it).

Cons: Limited number of inputs, and depending on software, interface, and computer, there may be a delay when playback is on during recording.

Micing the Amp
Pros: More natural or "live" sound. get the tone of your specific amp, not modeled software versions. Record full band playing together, without limit on number of instruments.

Cons: When recording, whatever sound you have is it (no changes to specific instruments), need mics + interface so it may be more expensive for good quality, and you must test out different mic positions/setups. Harder to master.
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#4
No problam

and if you are looking to get an interface, I highly recommend the M-Box Mini 2. It is very good quality, comes with Pro Tools LE 8 and is only about $280. It has 2 line-in inputs, a condenser mic input, and outputs for stereo speaker systems. It's incredible. I would get that, and you always have the option of either going direct in, or buying a condenser mic for the amp.
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#5
Here is my general rule of thumb:

Its always better to record a real amp if the amp is a quality amp. If you're recording a Marshall Full Stack or something like that, there isn't an amp sim that touches it. If you're recording with a typical starter amp (Line 6 Spiders, Vox Valvetronix, Basically anything solid state), you're way better going direct with an amp sim.
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#6
Quote by gatechballer
No problam

and if you are looking to get an interface, I highly recommend the M-Box Mini 2. It is very good quality, comes with Pro Tools LE 8 and is only about $280. It has 2 line-in inputs, a condenser mic input, and outputs for stereo speaker systems. It's incredible. I would get that, and you always have the option of either going direct in, or buying a condenser mic for the amp.

Mine just crashed my Macbook for the umpteenth time since I bought it. I do NOT recommend it, you can do better for the money. ProTools is overrated at the LE/MP level. This is coming from someone with lots of experience with HD and LE.

But to answer the original question- record DI then you can reamp it through a real amplifier with a speaker later if you want. Reamping is awesome, but not totally easy for a beginner.
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#7
Quote by Sid McCall
Mine just crashed my Macbook for the umpteenth time since I bought it.


You must have a really shitty Mac since I'm running my Pro Tools on Vista just fine with no problems whatsoever.
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#8
Quote by lockwolf
Here is my general rule of thumb:

Its always better to record a real amp if the amp is a quality amp. If you're recording a Marshall Full Stack or something like that, there isn't an amp sim that touches it. If you're recording with a typical starter amp (Line 6 Spiders, Vox Valvetronix, Basically anything solid state), you're way better going direct with an amp sim.


That's a crock. There's so many producers that use DI. John Mayer has before.
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