#1
I've been playing guitar for almost 3 years and I still don't know how to adjust my guitar. I can adjust the bridge on my Ibanez S guitar but that's only because it has that knob thing on the back to make it easier, lol. But I can't setup my guitar for crap, I have tried once and I just failed miserably. Thing is: my ears can't judge if the buzzing is getting better or not: it always sounds the same until it gets to the point that it's like ridiculous.

If I were just playing guitar for the hell of it, it wouldn't matter cause i could just keep getting my guitar store to fix it. But I do want to be in a band, and sooner or later I'm bound to have bridge/truss rod issues on the road, and there's always a chance of my local guitar store closing down(or moving somewhere without a guitar store).

So I assume that everyone suggests I just learn to do it. And I know how to setup a guitar's bridge and adjust the truss rod(I'm scared as hell to fix a truss rod since apparently it can ruin a guitar if not done properly) but my ears just don't pick up if buzzing is getting worse or better unless it changes dramatically Did anyone else have these issues when they began setting up their guitars by themselves?
#3
Most people have a hard time learning to set up a guitar or bass properly. This is because (a.) we have heard so many bogus horror stories about some unknown guy who destroyed his instrument with a simple turn of an Allen wrench, and (b.) properly setting up your guitar or bass is almost as much art as it is science.

If you don't trust your ears, then get a good guitar repair and setup book that lists the proper clearances and trust your eyes instead. This will eliminate the art and focus on the science, which works out almost as well. Get a few simple setup tools like a proper metal string height adjustment ruler and a set of fingerboard radius gauges from Stewart MacDonald or some such place. They aren't expensive, and you will be able to make precise adjustments to specifications and know you've hit the mark.

Don't worry about adjusting a truss rod. Yes, if you turn it a half-dozen times you might strip it or even break it, but you aren't going to do that. Rarely does a truss rod adjustment entail more than a 1/4 to 1/2 turn in either direction. A lot of times a 1/8 turn is enough.

You can do it.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
Last edited by FatalGear41 at Jun 19, 2010,
#4
Quote by FatalGear41
Most people have a hard time learning to set up a guitar or bass properly. This is because (a.) we have heard so many bogus horror stories about some unknown guy who destroyed his instrument with a simple turn of an Allen wrench, and (b.) properly setting up your guitar or bass is almost as much art as it is science.

If you don't trust your ears, then get a good guitar repair and setup book that lists the proper clearances and trust your eyes instead. This will eliminate the art and focus on the science, which works out almost as well. Get a few simple setup tools like a proper metal string height adjustment ruler and a set of fingerboard radius gauges from Stewart MacDonald or some such place. They aren't expensive, and you will be able to make precise adjustments to specifications and know you've hit the mark.

Don't worry about adjusting a truss rod. Yes, if you turn it a half-dozen times you might strip it or even break it, but you aren't going to do that. Rarely does a truss rod adjustment entail more than a 1/4 to 1/2 turn in either direction. A lot of times a 1/8 turn is enough.

You can do it.


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