#1
Hey, i came across these chords a little while ago and im not too sure on there names but ive been using them alot. Can anyone help me out?

e--x
b--x
g--x
d--2
a--3
D--2

and

e--x
b--x
g--6
d--7
a--5
D--x
#2
The first one is a C major in 1st inversion missing the 5th, the second is a D5 with an added maj7.
Last edited by pwrmax at Jun 19, 2010,
#3
You could call the first one E+(no 3rd), though it's technically a #5 dyad. Calling it E+(no 3rd) kind of introduces and dismisses a 3rd that never was there, and makes assumptions about the function of the chord, so it could equally be Em(no 3rd, #5), among other inversions and slash chords.

The second one could be called Dmaj7(no 3rd), though as with the first one, the lack of a 3 or b3 means it could equally be Dm/maj7(no 3rd); though for concision I'd be inclined to use the former.
#4
Quote by blue_strat
The second one could be called Dmaj7(no 3rd), though as with the first one, the lack of a 3 or b3 means it could equally be Dm/maj7(no 3rd); though for concision I'd be inclined to use the former.

I have to disagree with that. It is neither major nor minor and calling it either would be incorrect. That's why I called it D5maj7. It's just a power chord with an extra note.
#5
Quote by pwrmax
I have to disagree with that. It is neither major nor minor and calling it either would be incorrect. That's why I called it D5maj7. It's just a power chord with an extra note.

I was just pondering on whether the maj7 tag just prescribes an added 7, or whether it entails the whole 1 3 5 7 - like "Dmaj7" vs "D" + "maj7".

I think I'd go with you on that one.