#1
I have gone through many strings lately, specifically on my acoustic. But I keep having a lack of satisfaction with strings. Either not enough tightness and bass or maybe even muddy and lacking overall tone.

Basically I'm looking for any recommendations on acoustic strings. I'm looking for strings that are tight with a nice low end to them at around the medium gauge.

Thanks.
#3
I don't think it is tbh.

It's the Ibanez EW on my profile, and I love it.

I'm gonna pick up some Ernie Ball 2154 Medium's for the first time on monday, anyone have experience with those?

Thanks.
#4
I like me some DR's, give them a shot. Also what are ther tone woods of your Acoustic?
#5
Ive recently changed from Martin's to D'Addario Phospher Bronze's, they have a very nice tone.
#7
I have been using Elixr medium-light phosphor bronze. They sound great on my guitar, I use them mainly because I have really sweaty hands and most guitar strings don't last longer than 2-3 days, while the Elixr's will last 3-4 months. They do have a bit of a twangy sound, the next set I will try is going to be Elixr Bronze (not phosphor bronze...they were recommended to me by a friend).

D'addario Phosphor Bronze are also good, I have used them a few times.
#8
@mikegurnham I too have a similar problem with my hands.

Yeah I have been an Elixir users up until now and I have to say they do very good for anti-rust and corrosion. I guess they just have a little too much twang to them even after being broken in.

Has anyone had any experience with the Ernie Ball 2154 Medium Coated Strings?
#9
Quote by Funk Monk
It's the Ibanez EW on my profile, and I love it.


Then it very well could be your guitar. Sorry, but those things really don't have the greatest sound to them.
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#10
Quote by IronFeliks
...Also what are ther tone woods of your Acoustic?


Japanese Ply.
Quote by Cal UK

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#11
they surely don't. eventually people who play a lot outgrow the sound of their entry level or budget guitars. i'd think it's very possible that's what's happening to the op.

Quote by i_don't_know
Then it very well could be your guitar. Sorry, but those things really don't have the greatest sound to them.
#12
Quote by patticake
they surely don't. eventually people who play a lot outgrow the sound of their entry level or budget guitars. i'd think it's very possible that's what's happening to the op.


This is what I have found.

Mine isn't even as good as the OP's, but now that I can string a few chords together, I am finding the limitations of what I have, especially as I can now play those chords on better guitars, the difference is very apparent.

Everything just sounds a bit "crashy" on a Ply guitar.
Quote by Cal UK

...that's what Skeet always says anyway and he's a sex god.


Member of the official GB&C "Who to Listen to" list


I support Shay van Fani
I can supply WD Music, ABM and AllParts products to UK builders at DISCOUNTED prices!
#13
D'addario strings are the best you can get for tone and life, remember to wipe off your strings after you finish playing it does make a difference.
For accoustic nylon get high tension
for accoustic steel get medium or high tension

in general high tension strings have a longer life span, the decay on a note is also longer.
#15
It could very well be the guitar, or rather a specific part of it. Ibanez lists their saddle and nut material on the EW series as being made of Ivorex II. Man made ivory in other words. To date, I have yet to find a man made substance that can transfer the strings vibrational energies to the bridge and soundboard as efficiently as true bone or ivory. There's something about the cellular structure of bone and ivory that makes it about the most ideal material for this task. There are air pockets in it I know, but it's the makeup of it that allows for excellent tone. Bone and ivory also have low mass to weight ratio, which is another benefit. More towards volume, but still a bene just the same. Before going off on your string choice, perhaps you would be better served by replacing the saddle with bone or ivory and go from there. And for the record, in terms of bang for your buck on upgrades from man made materials to true bone/ivory, they are as follows, with the most noticeable to least: saddle, nut then bridge pins. The saddle upgrade will have the biggest effect, the pins the least.
#16
Although one constantly hears that deluxe bridge pins make a big sound effect... It's hard to imagine how this might be.
The string's vibrating length is from saddle to nut (or fretted note). The bridge pin merely secures the string. The pin does not actually do anything but hold the string in position against the bridge plate, which is what actually takes the tension of the string.

So, the only conceivable difference would be in the mass of the pin which might in some hardly-discernable manner affect the vibrational characteristics of the top.
Since the difference in mass between say, a plastic pin and a bone pin is in terms of only a few grains.... I don't imagine human ears could hear the difference.
They do look nice, however.
#17
Bridge pins do make a small diffrence in tone. But it is not nearly as great as replacing the saddle or nut. I have a set of ebony pins on my Yamaha and they do make a small change in sound. But soon after getting bridge pins I got a bone nut and saddle and they added a good amount of clarity to the sound of the guitar. Another thing one has to consider is string gauge. The thread starter may want to try a heavier gauge and more brands and materials. I always seem to get a good bassy sound with John Pearse Pure Nickels 13-57 if that is any help to the thread starter.

Or like people have stated before, he may be outgrowing his guitar.
#18
Yeah dude I'm usually somewhat of a "Ibanez Supporter" on this board in response to all the bad reviews others give them, but that guitar is a clear case of paying for aesthetics.

It's going to get pretty hard to get the tone your looking for without a solid top at least, but I guess trying a bone nut and saddle might help.

My advice is to throw it on ebay or craiglist for $250 (309 euro) and see if you get any buyers..then take that money and buy a real high quality, low budget guitar. (oxymoron weeee)
Fender Stratocaster USA Deluxe 2005
MIJ Fender Contemporary Stratocaster '85-'86 HSS System I DiMarzio SD Bridge
Epiphone 2010 Les Paul Tribute
Ibanez AW30ECE Acoustic
Line 6 IV 75w (lol)
#19
My dad has a low range(ish) spruce top washburn with martin light gauge strings, and I have a cheapo $99 steel string with D'addario phosphor bronze extra light (I used to have standard light gauge but it was too hard to play). Both the martins and the LIGHT addarios sound good to me, but unless your guitar is impossible to play I wouldn't go with the extra light gauge strings, since (especially with my cheap guitar) you will end up with very little body to your sound.
Gear:
Admira Artista classical guitar
$99 Steel string (actually quite good!)
COMING SOON... FREAK MAHOGANY TELE!
#21
I have a low-end Fender acoustic. I find that the selection of strings can make a BIG difference in the quality of sound (or at least, the perceived quality). I bought some better quality bridge pins, but the difference in sound was negligible. One day, I might replace the saddle and nut, which I'm pretty sure are made of some kind of cheap material.

Admittedly, my Fender has a solid top which probably helps a lot. But I'd definitely experiment with plenty of different types of strings before discarding the guitar. FWIW, I use D'Addario 80/20 Lights these days.