#1
Hi, I was wondering if any of you guys knew anything aboot how to come up with solos like from some of the early thrash albums, I would mainly like to learn how to do stuff like from Megadeth's first album (Killing Is My Business...) on songs like Mechanix and Looking Down the Cross. If any of you guys have any advice or good links to lessons or anything, could you please share some?
Quote by Kensai
Don't dig up the past, TS. You're not gonna like what you find.
#3
or you could throw a Slayer off, and play random notes. no sereiosuly, just learn your pentatonic scale and just noodle on that
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#4
First off, I hate Slayer (Please don't burn my house down OR eat my dog, please) and second, I dont really think i want to go the whole Randy Rhoads-Classical route, because I've never learned any of that theory stuff. I head Dave Mustaine never learned anything aboot music until he broke his nerve, but how did he still kick so much ass?
Quote by Kensai
Don't dig up the past, TS. You're not gonna like what you find.
#5
Quote by TheHammer
First off, I hate Slayer (Please don't burn my house down OR eat my dog, please) and second, I dont really think i want to go the whole Randy Rhoads-Classical route, because I've never learned any of that theory stuff. I head Dave Mustaine never learned anything aboot music until he broke his nerve, but how did he still kick so much ass?

He just used his ears and found out what sounded good. Then later when he learned theory he could put a name to the things he was doing. And ultimately, it's generally easier to write things if you know theory. You don't have to learn it, but if you do it will help a lot.
Quote by Geldin
Junior's usually at least a little terse, but he knows his stuff. I've always read his posts in a grouchy grandfather voice, a grouchy grandfather with a huge stiffy for alternate picking.
Besides that, he's right this time. As usual.
#6
Quote by TheHammer
First off, I hate Slayer (Please don't burn my house down OR eat my dog, please) and second, I dont really think i want to go the whole Randy Rhoads-Classical route, because I've never learned any of that theory stuff. I head Dave Mustaine never learned anything aboot music until he broke his nerve, but how did he still kick so much ass?


He had a ridiculous amount of experience with songwriting and playing, and probably practised obsessively. You can get there faster by learning some theory. Theory is an absolute gift when it comes to writing and playing music, not some unnecessary system of rules.
Also, there's no need to learn anything to do with classical music. Just start of with some pentatonics if you're determined on just getting into writing some solos quickly. Expand that after you've played around for a while.
If you're focused on writing solos in that style make sure you really look at what you like and break down what kind of phrasing is being used.
It really isn't that much work or as tedious as it sounds, and definitely worth it in the end.
#7
Killing is my Business (the entire album) has lots of fast pentatonic and harmonic minor runs in its solos. Dave's more prone to fast pentatonic rock licks/soloing whilst Chris has a more jazz influenced route where he takes into consideration what notes are going over what chord and how his phrasing comes off. Chris definitely know his theory. Great taste btw, probably my favourite record of all time.
#8
Quote by ApeWeevil
Theory is an absolute gift when it comes to writing and playing music, not some unnecessary system of rules.


+∞.

if you want to sound like dave mustaine, just noodle on the pentatonic scale. i like dave, but his leads are very predictable at times. peerless rhythm guitar player, though.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#9
Yeah, I would like to learn some theory some day, but I can't really find many great places on the web that speak in normal words. Its like trying to figure out what theyre saying in Guitar Worlds 'Betcha Cant Play This' articles
Quote by Kensai
Don't dig up the past, TS. You're not gonna like what you find.
#10
megadeths solos r really fast. I was play with a metronome a lot and drill scale shapes to the metronome to get ur speed up
#11
Basic pentatonic and blues scales with lots of hammers slides and tremolo picking
e---------------------------1----4
b------------------1---4----------
g-----1---3---4-------------------
single octave blues scale, also the blues equivalent to major scale
d--------------------------1---3
a-------------1---2---3---------
e-----1---4---------------------
blues equivalent to relavent minor

e----------------------1---4
b-------------1---4---------
g-----1---3-----------------
single octave pentatonic scale equivalent of major
d---------------------1---4
a-------------1---4--------
e----1---3-----------------
pentatonic equivalent of relevant minor

play these scales in any position, you now have all the pentatonic and blues scales for single octaves, these scales can even be played on single strings like so
e
b
g----1---3---4---5----8----10

e
b
g---1---3---5---8----10
and looke at that you are now in a nice place for soloing
Last edited by dIRV at Jun 20, 2010,
#12
Quote by The_Toki
Killing is my Business (the entire album) has lots of fast pentatonic and harmonic minor runs in its solos. Dave's more prone to fast pentatonic rock licks/soloing whilst Chris has a more jazz influenced route where he takes into consideration what notes are going over what chord and how his phrasing comes off. Chris definitely know his theory. Great taste btw, probably my favourite record of all time.

Yeah, Megadeth have been through a number of lead guitarists for one reason or another. Poland and Friedman are the fellas who play the properly hectic stuff.

I always maintain that Jazz is the hardest style of music to master, followed by Thrash. It's a whole load of theory, practise and creativity.
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#13
Be sure to practice some sequences too once you learn those pentatonic scales... Zakk Wylde likes to use double pentatonic scales, meaning he combines two positions together. This will give your pentatonics more of a hard rock vibe than a classic rock vibe.
#14
Quote by STONESHAKER
Be sure to practice some sequences too once you learn those pentatonic scales... Zakk Wylde likes to use double pentatonic scales, meaning he combines two positions together. This will give your pentatonics more of a hard rock vibe than a classic rock vibe.


There's no such thing as "double pentatonic scales" a pentatonic scale is a pentatonic scale, regardless of where it's played. The pentatonic minor, which will be the scale you'd want to be using for Megadeth, would be the natural minor, with the second and sixth notes omitted. In A minor, the key Looking Down the Cross is in, that would be A, C, D, E, G ... not counting the octave... five notes. Add the b5, or blues note, Eb in this case, and you have the blues scale. Play these notes anywhere on the fret board and you have the pentatonic scale. Don't waste your time learning rubbish "positions".
Last edited by The_Toki at Jun 21, 2010,
#15
Quote by The_Toki
There's no such thing as "double pentatonic scales" a pentatonic scale is a pentatonic scale, regardless of where it's played. The pentatonic minor, which will be the scale you'd want to be using for Megadeth, would be the natural minor, with the second and sixth notes omitted. In A minor, the key Looking Down the Cross is in, that would be A, C, D, E, G ... not counting the octave... five notes. Add the b5, or blues note, Eb in this case, and you have the blues scale. Play these notes anywhere on the fret board and you have the pentatonic scale. Don't waste your time learning rubbish "positions".



The "double pentatonic scale" he is referring to is combining the minor pentatonic and the major pentatonic of a particular key into the same scale, something that is very widely used in blues music. This is actually extremely useful for improvising, but for megadeth stuff, first off, just go for daves solos, they're all really easy and pentatonic based, just find the key and shred away. The speed comes with time. About a year to two years after you can play any of daves solos, you should go onto any of his other guitarist solos, and for those just be patient with them, theory will help for those.

Gaze long into the abyss, and the abyss gazes into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche
#16
Quote by RIotdenied58
The "double pentatonic scale" he is referring to is combining the minor pentatonic and the major pentatonic of a particular key into the same scale, something that is very widely used in blues music.


so what you're saying is that over a 12 bar blues progression in A, you'd use both the A minor pentatonic and A major pentatonic scales? that's not a "double pentatonic" scale, you're just using accidentals.

that's not to say that it sounds bad, though.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#17
Try to remember that the guitar is a musical instrument

A lot of people forget that and just go down the tabs / play as fast as i can route

If you want to write good solos, chances are you're gonna need some basic musical knowledge or some aural training in the very least
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


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#18
Quote by AeolianWolf
so what you're saying is that over a 12 bar blues progression in A, you'd use both the A minor pentatonic and A major pentatonic scales? that's not a "double pentatonic" scale, you're just using accidentals.

that's not to say that it sounds bad, though.



Yeah I mean I don't call it a double pentatonic and had never heard that term, I just think thats what he was talking about when he called it that.

Gaze long into the abyss, and the abyss gazes into you.
Friedrich Nietzsche
#19
Quote by RIotdenied58
Yeah I mean I don't call it a double pentatonic and had never heard that term, I just think thats what he was talking about when he called it that.


i understand what you're talking about, though. personally, i think using both in a bluesy context sounds great.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.