#1
New Bass Day is coming up! I'm still having some trouble deciding between the two so I came here I'm just wondering which one you prefer.

Just a few questions:
1. I intend to own both eventually, but I'm getting a Squier CV or a VM of this bass then later on when I have the money, I'll purchase a Fender of the other kind. Which one would you suggest getting the Fender in?

2. I like classic rock (Led Zep, Who, Yes, Cream, Pink Floyd, etc.), funk, jazz, and a bit of modern (RATM, RHCP). Which bass would better fit my musical taste? I heard that the Jazz has more tones possible, but that Precisions overall fit into really any music style.

Thanks!
#2
its a matter of preference. they sound and feel different. my preference is the Jazz, because i find the sound better. i'm a guitarist first but do play bass whenever given the chance. i find the feel of the instruments is a little different as well, but again, i give it to the jazz. its a little easier to play i think. plus i just think it looks sexier than a p bass.
#3
I'd get a squier p and mod it and then later get the fender jazz

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#4
I own a USA Precision and a USA Jazz, and the Jazz is definitely more versatile. For playing the more rock based stuff, I'd say that a Precision will do what you want better than a Jazz. I can get a fantastic tone for playing The Who stuff on my precision for example. The tone of a Precision is just more appropriate for that sort of stuff than that of a Jazz.

However, for playing stuff like RATM (Commerford plays a Jazz) or RHCP (Flea has used them) you're much better off with a Jazz bass. For all your funk or jazz related music, or most modern music, Jazz basses tend to fit better. I suppose it depends which type of music you play more regularly.

If I'm going anywhere for a practice or a jam, 9 times out of 10 I'll take my Jazz bass just because I know I'm more likely to be able to get the right sound of it, given the versatility. It also plays a bit faster than my P-bass because of the slimmer neck (this is preference). I can even get a Precision sort of sound out of the Jazz, but it's nowhere near as good as the real thing.

All in all, I'd say personally my Jazz bass is my main instrument, but I still love my P-bass and I wouldn't want to be without it. I wouldn't say either is better than the other - they're just different. It depends which suits you better.
#5
Your gonna get the "perfect" blues/rock tone out of a precision. But that all your gonna get. You can do a lot more with the jazz
#6
If you are like most bassists who love the Fenders, you will undoubtedly end up with both - probably more than one of each. So if you can't decide right now, just flip a coin. You really can't go wrong with either one.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#7
If I buy another bass, it will be a Precision -- nice and uncomplicated.

I like my basses to sound, you know, bassy. Unless maybe you're Chris Squire.
#8
Just get a Jazz. If you want the sound/tone of a P, just turn the volume of the bridge pickup all the way down and crank the neck pickup volume full. And of course adjust the tone know according to your preference.
#9
Both are extremely versatile. A Jazz can adapt to play anything, while a Precision has it's own sound that's never out of place.

When it comes down to it, its really a matter of comfort. Do you like the thinner neck of the Jazz, or the slightly chunkier neck of the Precision? Is the body of the P more comfortable for you, or do you prefer the offset body of the J?

Just play both to see which one you prefer.

EDIT: since you intend to eventually get both (a CV/VM and an MIM I assume), I suggest you compare the CV or VM Jazz to the MIM Jazz, and the CV or VM Precision to the MIM Precision. The MIM's use alder as body wood, while the CV's all are made of basswood, the VM Precision of agathis, and the VM Jazz of maple. The quality of the CV's and VM's are supposed to be close to that of the MIM's, but you may prefer a certain tonewood over another. Alder is relatively balanced tone-wise, maple is on the brighter side, and agathis and basswood are relatively transparent and lightweight.
/woodrant
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Last edited by Tostitos at Jun 21, 2010,
#10
Quote by RHCPFitz
Just get a Jazz. If you want the sound/tone of a P, just turn the volume of the bridge pickup all the way down and crank the neck pickup volume full. And of course adjust the tone know according to your preference.


No, just no. I wish I was Shiva, that's the only way I'd have hands enough to facepalm adequately. In nearly 20 years of playing bass, I've said no to this, approximately 4,093,746,529,746,592,387,459,384,759,834,759,283,284 times. 572 of them in here.
Just get a P. Almost the original, and in terms of just being bass, the best.
#11
^ So what seems to be the big problem with the neck pickup on a Jazz as compared to a P pickup? I play both and the difference isn't anything to write home about.
#13
Quote by RHCPFitz
^ So what seems to be the big problem with the neck pickup on a Jazz as compared to a P pickup? I play both and the difference isn't anything to write home about.


Honestly, you've probably got problems with your ears if you can't tell the difference between a precision bass and a jazz bass with the neck pup.
#14
Quote by Ziphoblat
Honestly, you've probably got problems with your ears if you can't tell the difference between a precision bass and a jazz bass with the neck pup.

Is that in person, with the two basses in front of you, or listening to a recording where you only have the sound to go by? Especially mixed in with the rest of the band, I'm sure a Jazz neck pickup at least gets close enough to pull it off. [/Devil's Advocate]

Anyway, it's not how many tones you have that makes you versatile, it's what you do with them. I could probably dial in all sorts of sounds on my Olympia, but I only ever use the one tone, and that works fine on everything from America to Yes. Or am I missing something here?
#15
Quote by obeythepenguin
Is that in person, with the two basses in front of you, or listening to a recording where you only have the sound to go by? Especially mixed in with the rest of the band, I'm sure a Jazz neck pickup at least gets close enough to pull it off. [/Devil's Advocate]

Anyway, it's not how many tones you have that makes you versatile, it's what you do with them. I could probably dial in all sorts of sounds on my Olympia, but I only ever use the one tone, and that works fine on everything from America to Yes. Or am I missing something here?


That's in person, yes. I own a USA P-bass, and a USA J-bass, and honestly there's worlds between the two, even with the Jazz on the neck pup.
#16
Quote by Ziphoblat
That's in person, yes. I own a USA P-bass, and a USA J-bass, and honestly there's worlds between the two, even with the Jazz on the neck pup.

I meant that rhetorically. My point was that what seems like an obvious difference when you're directly comparing the two basses, might not be as obvious in an actual band setting, especially if it's just a recording and you don't actually see the instrument.
#17
Quote by JacoVictorKing
I like classic rock (Led Zep, Who, Yes, Cream, Pink Floyd, etc.), funk, jazz, and a bit of modern (RATM, RHCP)


Led Zep - JPJ used a Jazz bass.
RATM - Tim Commerford uses Jazz basses.
RHCP - Flea often uses Jazz basses.

Play both, then decide.
#18
Since this topic is already about precision vs jazz, I'd might as well ask my question here:

I recently joined a band as the bassist, and am wondering which bass you guys think would suit our style more. Here's a couple of youtube videos from before I joined:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6qYzil-mFY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cjONscE2_o

So based on our sound, which one do you guys think would fit in with the rest of the band better? Thanks

edit:
Quote by Spaz91
Led Zep - JPJ used a Jazz bass.
RATM - Tim Commerford uses Jazz basses.
RHCP - Flea often uses Jazz basses.

Play both, then decide.


JPJ also uses a fretless precision on some zep stuff, I think the album led zeppelin 2 uses it a fair bit. And flea I think only started using Jazz basses starting from the "by the way" era until now but I'm not 100% sure about this.
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Last edited by ilikeguitar90 at Jun 21, 2010,
#19
Quote by obeythepenguin
I meant that rhetorically. My point was that what seems like an obvious difference when you're directly comparing the two basses, might not be as obvious in an actual band setting, especially if it's just a recording and you don't actually see the instrument.


Exactly. The difference is small enough that it will be hard to pick out, IMO.
#20
Quote by Spaz91
Led Zep - JPJ used a Jazz bass.
RATM - Tim Commerford uses Jazz basses.
RHCP - Flea often uses Jazz basses.

Play both, then decide.


JPJ used both precisions and jazzes about equally up until about '77, where he began to use almost exclusively Alembic basses

Timmy C uses lakelands, not fenders

Flea switched back and forth between Fender and Modulus depending on the era your looking at
Last edited by tubatom868686 at Jun 22, 2010,
#21
Another question:
About how much would it take to get a P-bass then add a single coil at the bridge?
#22
they have the Fender Pbass Deluxe which i think is awsome
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#23
Quote by JacoVictorKing
Another question:
About how much would it take to get a P-bass then add a single coil at the bridge?

You could get a Precision Deluxe as already mentioned, or you could mod an existing P bass.

If you take it to a professional it might get a tad expensive (labor + you'd have to provide the pickup). If you do it yourself, it will only cost you price of the pickup, but you need to know how to use a drill and a router, and you would then have to re-wire the bass yourself.
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#24
Just get a PJ bass instead of modding a P bass or a J bass.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#25
I'll second what everybody else has said.
The Jazz will give you a bigger range of sounds than the Precision (if you play through a good amp), but it is a single-coil (bass) guitar, so you won't get as "thick" a sound as you may get from a Precision.
[Although, Jimi Hendrix only ever played single-coil guitars, and he managed to rock out quite sufficiently!]

Although, as I said, the major factor in your sound is your amplifier, not your bass. If you have a good amp, you'll get a great sound from whichever you choose.
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#27
Quote by RHCPFitz
Exactly. The difference is small enough that it will be hard to pick out, IMO.


I still disagree. I've never heard a recording/band and thought "that sounds like a P-bass" when it was actually a Jazz. Yes, the Jazz is a little more ambiguous, and it might be able to fit into a setting where the P-bass would be ideal, but it won't do so as effectively, and it won't achieve that distinct sound of a P-bass. Honestly, you can spot the sound of a P-bass a mile off.
#28
Quote by Deliriumbassist
Only for the past 2 years. The bulk of his discography since the RATM self titled was indeed done with Fenders.


Interesting, I did not know this
#30
Quote by Bass First
^is it, thefitz in disguise?!


No, he's O'Brien from '1984'. Mostly because it's my 'Room 101' - the constant assertion that a J can in any way be a P. It just can't. Not any more than my Tele can be a Les Paul. Sure I can get some very meaty sounds out of the little ugmo, but it isn't, and never will be an LP.
It's the simple fact of the P's pup being a humbucker in everything but name, and the J toting a pair of single coils. The P's pup is in the middle of where the J's pups are, so they're not even working on the same vibrational nodes of the strings.
If you think there's no real difference, then you've got problems. Recordings can be deceptive; once the signal's been processed, massaged and mixed up with everything else, marginal differences can get lost.
30 years hence, I'll be sitting in a cafe, grizzled and broken, nursing a gin, when Jeff Beck at Ronnie Scott's will come on the telescreen. I'll think to myself 'maybe it wasn't so bad after all', then BANG!!...bullet in the back of the neck.
#31
save up the1grand then buy the Geddy Lee Signature fender Jbass. oh my god its the best bass ive ever played. i love it. but i agree with most of the people above, its a matter of preffernence. i prefer the sig jbass with like...no action at all. i shred on it. love it.
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#32
get the Pbass special or deluxe...whatever its called

P bass pick up and a J bass pick up in the bridge
#33
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It's pretty common knowledge i bassist circles that he took stock Fender Jazz basses, shoved on a precision neck and a BAII and rewound the pickup coils himself.


Were the stock coils not hot enough for him, or did he just like doing it himself?