#1
I was just wondering how much professional music has parts copy and pasted when there is repetition?
As in, do they just like record a chorus once?
In my band we record everything seperately and I think the variation makes it more interesting, but thats just my opinion.

EDIT: Typing fail
#2
Yeah, in the studio, it saves much time and much money to do this. Somtimes its not possible, but most of the time its really all it takes. The bands wrote the music from the beggining anyways and continue to play the entire songs while at a live event, I don't see any problem with it really.
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#3
a lot of times, just part of the chorus gets pasted. It's easier, if there are any layered harmonies, to just paste the vocals so the singer doesn't have to sing every line and every harmony 4+ times each.
#5
I agree. I'm a fan of separate recording. It gives a more raw natural sound rather than being the same every time but if you listen to just about any recorded song, you can hear that some parts will sound the exact same because they were just pasted elsewhere. It can make things much easier, like someone mentioned about harmonys.
It's really up to you if you want to copy something or record it again.
#7
My teacher for music tech told me to always play it over, not to copy and paste it. I guess it has more feeling to it, and bit of variation. Keeps the listener interested if it's a bit different.
#8
It depends on the engineer, the artist, and the style of music.

Alot of pop pretty much requires for the base of the chorus to be the same throughout the song, except they usually build on it with harmonies, doubles, reverbs, delays, and all sorts of goodies as the song progresses.
And this is actually a good thing to notice because pop artists also have the most money to make an album with, my mentor was once telling me how he got vocals for one song done in eight hours because of how relaxed the artist was about the takes, they don't care about studio time, yet the choruses are often pasted.

Doesn't happen as often in other styles of music, but mostly Pop, Hiphop and R&B that's what can happen, pop's where I feel it being the most prominent.
Last edited by Rakoro at Jun 22, 2010,
#9
Quote by Rakoro
It depends on the engineer, the artist, and the style of music.

Alot of pop pretty much requires for the base of the chorus to be the same throughout the song, except they usually build on it with harmonies, doubles, reverbs, delays, and all sorts of goodies as the song progresses.
And this is actually a good thing to notice because pop artists also have the most money to make an album with, my mentor was once telling me how he got vocals for one song done in eight hours because of how relaxed the artist was about the takes, they don't care about studio time, yet the choruses are often pasted.

Doesn't happen as often in other styles of music, but mostly Pop, Hiphop and R&B that's what can happen, pop's where I feel it being the most prominent.


What would be the downside to doing it with bass?
#10
Quote by sambot12
What would be the downside to doing it with bass?


Well a good bass take is constantly responding to whatever the drums and the rest of the song is doing, if its any sort of rock song it's going to be noticeable to someone who knows what to listen for, and will sound 'just weird for some reason' to people who don't.

If you're doing any sort of rock I would recommend against pasting parts.
#11
I disagree. I don't think the bassline changes so much from chorus to chorus that it would sound weird if it was the same, but to each his own.
#12
Like he basically said, it depends if you have a crappy bass player or not.
Treble>Epiphone Prophecy EX - MXR micro Amp - MXR Blue Box - MXR Fullbore - MXR Noise Clamp - Vox AD30VT
Bass>Ibanez BTB505 - MXR Blowtorch - MXR D.I. - Peavey MaxBass 700 - Peavey TVX410
#13
Well what I meant is that a good bass take is constantly changing very subtly, responding to whatever the song is doing, growing louder and with more attitude with certain parts, and softer in others.
#14
Quote by Rakoro
Well what I meant is that a good bass take is constantly changing very subtly, responding to whatever the song is doing, growing louder and with more attitude with certain parts, and softer in others.

Definitely, but I don't think it would sound that weird if it didn't change between 2 choruses.