#3
generally accepted way of sounding good. Like to some people a g and Ab played together wouldn't sound great to most people, but to a couple it would sound great. Or like the I-IV-V chord progression. That always sounds nice.
#4
Well a key change means you change from one key to another, so there is really no way to sound "better" or "worse". Some are EASIER to change into or present less of a radical change, but a key change means the key signature itself changes and a whole new key is established while the previous key is basically removed tonally from your memory.
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#5
Typically, the more natural sounding key changes are between keys with at least one commonality. It could be something like a similar root note (changing from D major to D minor, for example) or adding/removing just one sharp/flat (changing from G major to D major, or from G minor to D minor). However, there are obviously a lot of natural sounding key changes that don't follow this method, but it's just one way of going at it.
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#6
a change from any key to any other key can be made to sound good. it's just more difficult to modulate to a key further away from the original.
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#7
Quote by guitarsftw
Typically, the more natural sounding key changes are between keys with at least one commonality. It could be something like a similar root note (changing from D major to D minor, for example) or adding/removing just one sharp/flat (changing from G major to D major, or from G minor to D minor). However, there are obviously a lot of natural sounding key changes that don't follow this method, but it's just one way of going at it.


If you want "generally accepted" key changes then these are the ones you would start with as they are closest (key-change-wise).
#8
Depends on the application. Everyone above has been correct, but you need to think of how it is being applied. If you are doing and instrumental piece, then guitarsftw gave you the best advice. If you have vocals, try and find out what key's he/sher can naturally transition to with their voice. This will give you clearner key changes with a singer.
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#9
You can change to any Key. All you need to do it play the V7 of the new Key JUST BEFORE moving to the new Key.

Say you're playing in G, like ||: G | D | G | D....etc...

and I'll just pick Eb as our new Key...you would just play Bb7 right before you move to Eb, like so...

| G | D | G | D Bb7 | Eb | Bb | Eb | Bb.....

or let say we wanted to change to the Key of A, we'd play E7 just bbefore moving to A, like


| G | D | G | D A7 | E | B | E | B.....

Since it DOES NOT matter what Key you move to as long as you throw that V7 in there, let's string those examples together to create a progression that continues to change Keys.

| G | D | G | D Bb7 | Eb | Bb | Eb | Bb A7 | E | B | E | B.....

That V7 will always resolve to a new I chord. So in theory you could continue changing Keys as long as you want, you can even grab a V7 chord at random as long as you resolve it to the new I chord.

To make your V7 longer you could proceed the new Key with both a IIm-V7 resolving to the new I chord. This is like 'back pedaling through Circle of 5ths", so in theory you could do a III7-V7-IIm-I to the new Key or a VII7-III7-V7-IIm-I. The further out you start you are going to have to really 'sell it' though. And sometimes the chords will have to go by so quick that it's easier to still 'think' IIm-V7 but imply those other chords a extensions and alterations to a IIm-V7 progression.
Last edited by MikeDodge at Jun 21, 2010,
#10
Quote by kh2xiii
How can you figure out what key changes sound good together?


You learn alot of music and develop opinions. What you don't want to do is blindly follow someone's theoretical prescription that you read online. That's a disconnected approach. You need to experience and understand the music for yourself.

Listen - appreciate - learn about - play - enjoy:
Do this with LOTS of music, then you wont have to ask subjective questions like this because you'll have your own opinion.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 21, 2010,