happyguy155
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
23 IQ
#1
I took my Ibanez pf15 acoustic to a guitar center to have the action adjusted (20 bucks...) when I first started playing a few years ago. Well the action has been way too low for years and I'd like to start playing on this guitar again. However, the truss rod is stuck. I'm pretty sure that the guy knew next to nothing and just turned the truss rod all the way, decided not to wait for it to adjust, and turned it some more. I needs a lot more force than my mexican strat does and I'm afraid to push it further.

What can I do? The guitar can't be worth more than 300 bucks so I don't want to get it professionally fixed.
Jesus_Dean
Jumpin´ Jiminy Jeezus!
Join date: Dec 2008
2,367 IQ
#2
Have you tried removing the strings and then adjusting the truss rod?
Arguing on the Internet is a lot like being in the Special Olympics. Even if you win you're still retarded
Dmt8jr
Registered User
Join date: May 2010
238 IQ
#3
Adjusting your truss rod has nothing to do with the action of the guitar, it straightens the neck out pushing the strings down a tab. Lts face the facts, its an acoustic guitar, the action will not be good no-matter how great the guitar is.


But yeah try removing the strings like jesus dean said and give your truss rod a quarter turn then wait 10 minutes, see if it helps.
Dmt8jr
Registered User
Join date: May 2010
238 IQ
#4
oh sorry i didnt think about this, if u dont have a new set of strings to put on it dont take yours off, just lossen them
happyguy155
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
23 IQ
#5
Quote by Dmt8jr
Adjusting your truss rod has nothing to do with the action of the guitar, it straightens the neck out pushing the strings down a tab. Lts face the facts, its an acoustic guitar, the action will not be good no-matter how great the guitar is.


But yeah try removing the strings like jesus dean said and give your truss rod a quarter turn then wait 10 minutes, see if it helps.


Unfortunately I didn't know this when I started playing. And the action is too low, the strings buzz on the first five frets very loudly. I don't think cutting the strings will have much of an effect on this.
captivate
d[-.-]b Asian Audiophile.
Join date: Apr 2007
1,602 IQ
#6
Ask any experienced guitar tech... You do not need to wait for the truss rod to "adjust". Any adjustments made are pretty much instant. In any case, you need the pitch of the neck to be assessed by someone who knows what they're doing. I know a setup is expensive, but if you want it done right...

Explaining things in text over the internet is a really poor way of conveying helpful information in these cases.
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patticake
Acoustic Goddess
Join date: Jun 2009
2,886 IQ
#7
you don't use a truss rod to adjust a guitar's action, although lots of people do this. you raise and lower the action by adjusting the nut and saddle - you either file them very slightly, put in new ones that are taller, or shim them up. the truss rod is for adjusting the neck relief.

i can't even imagine why you would think a truss rod or a guitar's action could be waited for it to adjust. that doesn't actually make any sense.

btw, most likely the truss rod is stuck. it happens.

why don't you just take your guitar to a luthier?
happyguy155
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
23 IQ
#8
Like I said, I don't think the guitar is worth a professional set up. If I'm going to spend that money, it would go toward my strat. However, I like to set up my strat truss rod by having a tiny space at the 12th fret when pressing down on the first and last fret. On the acoustic, the string is pressing down at the 12th fret so it obviously needs some adjustment.

I don't mind if the action ends up being too high I can adjust the bridge another time. Is it possible for a novice to fix this kind of truss rod problem?
patticake
Acoustic Goddess
Join date: Jun 2009
2,886 IQ
#9
a set up isn't that expensive but it's also easy enough to do yourself if you have very very fine sandpaper and patience.

it depends on what the truss rod problem is. it could have needed lubrication or it could be broken. you can buy something for the second problem at stew-mac.com but whether a novice could use it, i couldn't say.

i suggest you take your guitar to a luthier so they can tell you what the problem is. you don't have to have them fix it, but that way you'll know. btw, if you use your truss rod to "fix" the action, you'll have spots up and down the neck where the action is higher or lower.
GC Shred Off
is into you.
Join date: Jan 2008
884 IQ
#10
Quote by Dmt8jr
Adjusting your truss rod has nothing to do with the action of the guitar, it straightens the neck out pushing the strings down a tab. Lts face the facts, its an acoustic guitar, the action will not be good no-matter how great the guitar is.


But yeah try removing the strings like jesus dean said and give your truss rod a quarter turn then wait 10 minutes, see if it helps.

All sorts of things wrong here.

1) The truss rod absolutely affects the action, it just isn't always the solution. Checking to make sure the neck is straight should always be the first step.

2) Acoustic guitars can have great action. Not sure why you'd call the contrary a fact.

3) Taking off the strings will be a waste of time, as is waiting in between adjustments.


If the bolt is really seized on there (which is common), try to carefully sneak a dab of penetrating lubricant onto it. After that, try to give it a good crank in the loosening direction. You don't need to be a maniac about it, but don't be gentle either. Truss rods can be stubborn, but they're usually pretty beefy as well.

There are about 50 threads on here explaining other things that could be the root of the issue. Search around a bit.
Last edited by GC Shred Off at Jun 22, 2010,