#3
All I know is David Gilmour was a toothpick before and he could shred crazy already then.

So probably but it's not necessary?
#5
For bending and vibrato on heavy strings, it can help, but for the fine motor control and muscle memory required there's nothing better than just practising.
#6
No, not at all. The best way to build guitar-playing stamina is to, well, play guitar.
Quote by blackflag49
Condoms, for all the copious amounts of pussy with which you will be inevitably bombarded from this moment onward.


#7
Quote by C_Sleezy
Does working my arms out help with playing longer?


Practicing more often will help more than weightlifting. The best way to get better at guitar is by playing the thing. There's no way around that.
There's tonnes of really thin musicians like Paul Gilbert or Guthrie Govan who could shred for days.
#8
Quote by Eddy~
All I know is David Gilmour was a toothpick before and he could shred crazy already then.

I think that describing Gilmour as a shredder is fairly inaccurate... even compared to contemporaries such as Page, Hendrix and Clapton, he wasn't a particularly fast player. I think he was the most emotive of the lot, but that's not the point. Compared to today's lot, he's just an old man! But a living legend nonetheless. Pink Floyd.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#9
So, it's okay to get tired from playing guitar? That builds stamina and endurance?
#10
Quote by C_Sleezy
So, it's okay to get tired from playing guitar? That builds stamina and endurance?

Yeah man. You're supposed to. It's like anything else in life. When you first run, how tired do you get? But if you run every day, soon you will get faster and less tired and fitter and so forth. It's all a matter of practice and repetition, and you will build up odd muscles that you've probably never really used before.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#11
Quote by seemeel
Yeah man. You're supposed to. It's like anything else in life. When you first run, how tired do you get? But if you run every day, soon you will get faster and less tired and fitter and so forth. It's all a matter of practice and repetition, and you will build up odd muscles that you've probably never really used before.



Okay awesome man.
#12
One example that I can think of now is Dream Theater's Stream of Consciousness - on of the early riffs calls for a stretch from 3rd fret second string to 8th fret third string. Now at first this was so difficult, I almost had to use my picking hand to position my fingers because I couldn't make them go to the right places on the fretboard. But, with practice, I got there and now I can play it okay.

Another example of stretching of the fretting hand is Message in a Bottle.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#13
I read an article were George Lynch said he had to cut back on the body building because it was slowing his hands down. I don't remember the exact quote but it was in a Guitar World mag.
Imagination is more important than knowledge...
It is a miracle that curiosity survives formal education.
- Albert Einstein -
#14
Quote by Bertallica
I read an article were George Lynch said he had to cut back on the body building because it was slowing his hands down. I don't remember the exact quote but it was in a Guitar World mag.

I don't see how that's possible; take a look at John Petrucci.
Though, trying to play right after you workout may prove difficult because the muscles are still stiff.

In short, it's beneficial to vibrato/bending/endurance/standing up playing (if you do ab, back, shoulder, leg exercises, etc).
I see no disadvantages. Plus you get bigger in the process.
#15
"working out" properly can't hurt anything; it will improve your overall health general fitness.
If you sing it can't but help your lung capacity and breath control.
Just generally good for you...
However, the bane of guitar players is overuse injuries. Carpal tunnel and similar conditions.
Has ruined more than a few careers and caused long layoffs on others.
Use good form, and it's not necessary to "play until your fingers bleed" to make progress.