#1
me and my band were thinking of putting an instrumental in our set but need some help finding a starting point. we tried diminished but they sounded too comicly scary. any ideas? btw we were looking for a ktulu kind of feel. catchy but scary
this signature has my gear in it. nothing more, nothing less

Gear
Ibanez S770PB
Jackson Rhoads
Custom Strat
Agile Al 3100
Rainbow Music Shop Custom Les Paul
Dunlop Crybaby Wah
Bugera 6260 212
Line 6 Spider III
#2
Try this, starting from low E 002240
Gear:
American Strat (Modded with Kinman Pickups and more )
PRS Paul Allender (Don't like Cradle of Filth though )
Line 6 Spider Valve 212 (Broken )
Blackstar HT-5 Combo Amp


DR.ZOIDBERG!!!!! (Very inspirational)
#4
I find its not so much the chords but the effects used. If you have the pedals, and amps to do it try adding reverbs and echoes to open chords.
Plucking a simple AM open chord with echo on it comes out really freaky and haunting.
#5
Try adding 2nds between notes for some rub

Also check out quartal harmonies
Alvarez dreadnought
Gibson SG
EC-1000
Homemade Strat (seymour duncan classic stack p/ups)
Vox Tonelab (original desktop model) with full board footswitch
Vox AD50
Avatar V30 4x12 cab
#7
start with a major triad... 1-3-5... then you can mess around changing a note from that triad 1-3-5b...1-4-5... 1-3-5#.... etc... you can come up with some exotic chords that way... just never changed the 1 in the chord because then you change the root note of a chord...after you found a traid sound you like, then convert it into a chord... and bam...
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Ok can we stop sucking this dudes dick and deal with my question?
#8
It's not about chords directly, it's about the progression you use.
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#9
Quote by Jasonbts
It's not about chords directly, it's about the progression you use.


+1. precisely.
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#10
I think that 024000 sounds pretty cool o_o
Could use that in a progression somehow perhaps.
Quote by DiminishedFifth
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#11
I think you'd like to see this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGeDXzPd7zc

Dave Mustaine had this article in Guitar World a while back where he explained how he would create lots of "spooky" chords and strums them "upside-down" so the higher notes "don't get eaten up by the bass notes" has he puts it. A lot of what he plays in the video aren't really "chords" but two-note dyads. In the Looking Down the Cross, for example, he plays something like XX2550 and XX2540 alternating between the two. Another thing to add spooky dissonance is to make those horror movie cliche chords where you take two or three chromatic tones and play them together. An example of this would be playing A, A#, and B at once, to get this really dissonant sort of chord that sort of sounds like it came out of the shower scene from psycho. This might be a bit of a stretch for you, but here's and example using the notes E, Eb, and D

E-12
B-16
G-19
D-
A-
E-

or simply

E-12
B-16
G-
D-
A-
E-

seems to do the trick too
Last edited by The_Toki at Jun 21, 2010,
#13
Quote by tenfold
Try a sus2/b6 or a susb6 (any better names for these?).
Despite probably the wrong names, try Asus2/F or A5addb6.


It's better if you considered the b6 as a #5 for an augmented chord and with that sus2 or 9th you could probably get a nice and ambiguous whole tone scale lick so that could be cool actually.

Also for the TS, try harmonizing the melodic minor. The other thread about the MinMaj7 chord might give you some tips. That MinMaj7 chord is the hitchcock one I think and all the others in the melodic minor blend together well and are dark and creepy if you tinker around with them.
#14
It's less about the chords you use and more about the "effects" and such. With 3 chords I made, what I consider, something very haunting. I did it because it feels hollowed out and... different. Lots of reverb, echo/delay, "thin" timbre, stuff like that.

As for actual techniques, chromatic movement, atonality, close (or the opposite extreme) intervals, slow and drury... the like.
Last edited by DiminishedFifth at Jun 21, 2010,
#15
Quote by Jasonbts
It's not about chords directly, it's about the progression you use.


This. But the choice of chords definitly helps, at least the sound of things might get you into the 'zone' and inspire writing.

Annyhow, I'm not sure what the OP means with haunting.. that's a bit too vague.
Haunting as in evil and scary? Spooky and mysterious? Something else?

There's some I can think of that might classify as 'haunting' though..


e-----------8-
B--------8--x-
G-----7--x--5-
D--7--x--5----
A--x--5-------
E--5----------


Technically not an chord but an interval, it has even less resons to be called a chord then a powerchord. Basicly it's just a root + octave. Or a powerchord without the fifth. Whatever you want to call it, it has a kind of mysterious / ethereal sound.


e--------------5--
B-----------6--7--
G--------5--7-----
D-----5--7--------
A--5--7-----------
E--7--------------


Just a minor third interval. Can be mysterious or sad sounding, depending what you do with it. The shape is like a powerchord but inverted. Very popular with black metal, for some reason.

Hmm, cant realy think of any more unfortunatly. But if you know the notes which go in chords and where you can find those on the fretboard, try making your own chords with a few notes on an open string.
For example:

e--10----0--
B--12----8--
G---0----9--
D---9----7--
A--10----0--
E---0----8--


By the way, the first one is a Eminor7th and the second one is a Aminor7th inversion with a C in the bass
#16
As DiminishedFifth said; effects, tone, timbre etc are generally more important in this case. But saying that, minor second intervals ringing out help...

Pay attention to the drums as well, they are very important for this type of stuff in my experience.
#17
Check out "Diary of a Madman" for a good example of chords giving a haunted feeling.

Also check out Neapolitan chords. Go to this website and look under lessons and look at the three lessons about Neapolitan chords. (They're at the bottom).
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#18
Here is a chord, ITS IN DROP D!

0
6
7
7
5
0


I think its d minor diminished 9 with a drop d base or something, not really sure the name but yeah, cool chord, single strum sounds creepy, played kinda slow.

Can also be played like this:

0
6
9
0
0
0

Enjoy
#19
PS ^^ Three Days Grace uses that chord a bit just thought I'd throw that out there lol.
#20
Quote by Zach101
Here is a chord, ITS IN DROP D!

0
6
7
7
5
0


I think its d minor diminished 9 with a drop d base or something, not really sure the name but yeah, cool chord, single strum sounds creepy, played kinda slow.

Can also be played like this:

0
6
9
0
0
0

Enjoy


It's just a DminAdd9
#21
Quote by The_Toki
It's just a DminAdd9


Oh ok thanks, I knew it was something along those lines..
#22
Quote by meow1992
me and my band were thinking of putting an instrumental in our set but need some help finding a starting point. we tried diminished but they sounded too comicly scary. any ideas? btw we were looking for a ktulu kind of feel. catchy but scary


Well Minor Chords seem to have not so bright tone...
Idk if thats the answer you were looking for.
#23
Mix up dimished/augmented with some minor and 7th chords. Maybe even 9ths. Minor Seconds tend to be dissonant. Harmonise in dissonant intervals. Heavy toms to accentuate tension. The occasional non-standard time signature does wonders. And rather than filling up the entire spectrum have lots of contrats between the lows and the highs.

As for effects, lots of reverb, perhaps a deep phaser.

Might get you underway a bit.
#24
Quote by rockingamer2
Check out "Diary of a Madman" for a good example of chords giving a haunted feeling.

Also check out Neapolitan chords. Go to this website and look under lessons and look at the three lessons about Neapolitan chords. (They're at the bottom).


I wouldn't say Neapolitan 6ths sound haunting, rather add a more expressive effect.
#25
I find a good way to create tension is to chromatically (one fret at a time) move up one note in an arpeggio with each playthrough of it. See: Hangar 18 intro chords (which are similar, if not identical to Call of Ktulu if I remember right).