#2
i didnt listen to the song, but if the melody resolves to B, it doesnt mean B is the tonic of the key.
the B sounds good because G is the first chord, (if you dont know this learn music theory) and B is the major third of G.


EDIT: i listened to the song, and i was correct.
the B sounds good because it is in the G major chord.

its actually a cool song too
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Last edited by musicTHEORYnerd at Jun 22, 2010,
#3
I agree with my above friend. See, the G chord is broken down as G (the root), B (the natural 3rd, flatting this causes a Gminor chord), and D (the 5th). Therefore, resolving a vocal harmony with B fits over a G chord. Some of the better examples, imho, are where the chord progression includes weird chords.
#5
my computer won't let me listen to the file. either way, i can tell you:

Quote by illmatic2594
But is it still locrian?


no, it's impossible for this to be locrian. it's either G mixolydian or G major with a borrowed Fmaj chord. i'd have to listen to it to be sure, but after playing it on the piano, i'd say it's probably G mixolydian.
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#6
Quote by illmatic2594
http://www.zshare.net/audio/77491783f6c1c68b/

A friend of mine wrote this song.

The progression is G-F-Am-G7.

The vocal melody is using the notes of C major, and it sounds like it's resolving to B.

Does this mean it's locrian?

I thought diminished chords were necessary for locrian composition.


It's not locrian.


Quote by AeolianWolf
it's either G mixolydian or G major with a borrowed Fmaj chord. i'd have to listen to it to be sure, but after playing it on the piano, i'd say it's probably G mixolydian.

+1

Quote by musicTHEORYnerd
if the melody resolves to B, it doesnt mean B is the tonic of the key.


This is a good point as well.
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 22, 2010,
#7
If a melody doesn't always resolve to the tonic of a key, then how is it possible to find the tonic of the key?
#8
Quote by illmatic2594
If a melody doesn't always resolve to the tonic of a key, then how is it possible to find the tonic of the key?



You have to understand harmony. You should know how to construct chords. You should be able to recognize chord progressions. You should understand the idea of tension and resolution.

There is alot to it. Not teachable in a thread.

I would recommend.....

Lessons &/or books + time
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Last edited by GuitarMunky at Jun 22, 2010,
#9
I do have some degree of understanding of those things.

But if it's G mixolydian, I thought that meant it had to resolve to G.

This resolves to B. Or does it only involve the harmony? Meaning it resolves to a G chord and therefore it's in G mixolydian?
#10
It's in G major. Actually it could be modal (mixolydian, not locrian and I'll explain why later), but it didn't immediately sound modal to me.

The reason the B sounds resolved is because it's a chord tone. That doesn't mean it's the root. That just means it occurs in the tonic chord.

You can't really write something in the locrian mode by accident. Because of the b5 and other "unstable" intervals, it's difficult to make it resolve, it'll almost always want to resolve somewhere else (most likely to ionian/major).
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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Last edited by food1010 at Jun 22, 2010,
#11
So, it's not resolving to B, it just SOUNDS like it is, because it's a chord tone?

That makes alot more sense.

Thank you very much.
#12
Quote by illmatic2594
So, it's not resolving to B, it just SOUNDS like it is, because it's a chord tone?

That makes alot more sense.

Thank you very much.
Well, sort of. It's resolving to G major, the tonic; but the note B is a chord tone of that tonic, so a melody will sound resolved on that note.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#13
Also, an important point is to note that chords dictate tonality, melody does not necessarily. In order for a progression to be in a certain key or use a certain mode, it must resolve on the tonic of that key or mode. For example, try playing that progression, then ending it with a Bm(b5) or Bm7b5 chord (the tonic of the locrian mode). Now try playing it and ending it with Gmaj. Nice?