#1
so i got this spalted maple for 40$ with free shipping but i have some questions about preparing it to be routed and leveled. notice the centerline, both blanks have zero spalting there at all so i was wondering, tomorrow i am picking up a bench top sander and i am wondering can i level them with that? i believe i can because there is no spalting to worry about. but after i level the center on both pieces and glue it up, i plan on using a high gloss polyurethane to harden the spalting so its easier to sand and level. i plan on doing this with a step by step process of wiping the top down with alcohol, and then applying the gloss thinly on the top and then rubbing it with steel wool. i will be repeating this about 3 or 4 times until i feel satisfied with the results.

after i do all that, will it be fine to work with? can i then level it and glue it to my basswood blank and then cut out the body shape and then route the neck pocket, pickups, etc?


pic of the top im using, unstained, unsanded
#3
Quote by scorpio2billion
I'd flip both pieces over and glue the opposite edges!


This and everything u said to finnsih it
#5
Quote by dachristmasfish
That looks like really crude stuff. Are you sure it's not going to fall apart or anything?


It's meant to look like that.

I'm fairly sure you're going to want to do all the work on it before you apply the finish. Just be careful when sanding, since the dust from spalted maple can be really bad for you.
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#6
Quote by Steve Holt
It's meant to look like that.

I'm fairly sure you're going to want to do all the work on it before you apply the finish. Just be careful when sanding, since the dust from spalted maple can be really bad for you.
so leveling, gluing the top and routing should all be done before i apply finish? i read that you should put multiple layers of finish on because it hardens the wood so there isnt any tear out. do you have a source that says otherwise steve holt? it would be helpful. i will only be routing the control cavity where there is spalting. any tips?

also the reason im not aligning the spalting together is because its not a bookmatched piece. its more asymmetrical. its looks sloppy with the spalting side by side. its more uniform this way. and also it will show off a majority of the spalting.
Last edited by necroscience13 at Jun 22, 2010,
#7
How bad is the spalt? Is it decayed extensively? Or is it still semi stable?
Putting multiple layers of clear on before routing and such does seem like a wise choice, though i've never heard of it. Simple concept though, clear builds it up, fill's small cracks, and makes it slightly more stable.
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#8
its not too bad compared to other spalted tops ive seen. its a thick piece too with no spalting in the center. all the cutting i will be doing misses a lot of the spalted parts. the only problems i could see is it not being level, which is why im thinking about using stain on the top unless someone can tell me otherwise. should i be worried about bandsawing it at all? also i will be routing through mostly just the basswood for the control cavity. for the body, the basswood will be 1 1/16" thick and the top will be 7/16" thick making it 1.5" thick.
Last edited by necroscience13 at Jun 22, 2010,